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Grade: 3-5
Subject: Geography

#1151. Map Skills

Geography, level: Elementary
Posted Fri Jul 2 08:00:39 PDT 1999 by Kristi Watson (watsonk@dike-newhartford.k12.ia.us).
New Hartford Elementary School, New Hartford, Iowa, USA
Materials Required: CD ROM computer,LCD projector,Neighborhood Map Machine computer program by Tom Snyder Productions
Activity Time: 3 Lessons, 7 - 10 days
Concepts Taught: Map Skills: Definition of a Map, Map Symbols, and Compass Rose

Lesson 1: How Does a Map Show Our World?
Map Skills - Third Grade
Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary
June 28, 1999

Objectives:
*Understand that a map shows how a place looks from above.
*Explain how to use a map key.

Overview:
Students learn that a map is a drawing that shows what a place looks like from above. They use a map key and symbols to create a map of the school and its neighborhood.

Resources Needed:
*Communities Around Us, Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997

Time: 1 -2 periods

Classroom Structure:
Large group instruction followed by small group activity.

Materials:
*Paper
*Colored pencils or crayons
*Text (Silver Burdett Ginn, Communities Around Us: Grade 3)

Introduction:
1. Discuss what is a bird’s-eye view.
2. Ask each student to collect 5 small objects in the classroom and place them on the floor. Have them look down on the objects and draw pictures of how they look from straight overhead.
3. Share and discuss.

Lesson:
1. Read pages M2 - M3 from text together. Discuss.

Activity: (Groups will complete this activity while waiting to use the computer in the Lesson 2 activity.)
Students will work in groups of 2 - 3 to create a map of the school and its neighborhood.
1. Give each group a piece of paper.
2. Tell the students to imagine that they are flying over our school and its neighborhood. If they took a photograph of what they saw below them, what would it look like?
3. Have them draw a map of the area using colored pencils or crayons that includes a map key and symbols for important features.
4. Share and compare. Comments.
5. Collect and place in conference folder.

Assessment:
*Teacher Observation
*Student product to be placed in portfolio


Lesson 2: Map Symbols
Map Skills - Third Grade
Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary
June 28, 1999

Objectives:
*Explain what is a map symbol.
*Use a map key to read a map.

Overview:
Students learn to recognize common map symbols. They work in small groups to plan a map of a community. They create and write about this community using the Neighborhood Map Machine software. Students will also create 3D maps of their plans.

Resources Needed:
*Communities Around Us , Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997
*Neighborhood Map Machine, Tom Snyder Productions, 1997
*Computer (Sytem 7.1 or higher, 2 megabytes of available RAM, 640 x 480 color monitor)
*LCD Projector

Time: 4 - 6 periods


Materials:
*Symbols from magazines and signs.
*Large Neighborhood Map Machine symbols printed from the Print Goodies menu (named Buildings #1, Building #2, Building #3) for each group.
*Blank Neighborhood Map Machine map grid printed in the 4x4 or 6x6 size. One for each group.
*Large floor grid for each group (4x4 or 6x6 size).
*Neighborhood Map Machine 3D cutouts.
*Text (Silver Burdett Ginn: Communities Around Us, Grade 3)

Introduction:
1. Review lesson: How Does a Map Show Our World (M2). Review: How are symbols like the real objects? How are they different? Why do we use symbols?
2. Collect a variety of symbols from magazines, signs, ect. Post copies of the symbols on the board/bulletin board. Ask students to cut pictures from magazines and post these next to the appropriate symbols. Discuss.

Lesson:
1. Read page M7 together. Discuss.
2. Introduce the program Neighborhood Map Machine - Create a Map using a LCD projector if possible.

Activity:
Students will work in the small groups from Lesson 1 to plan and create a map of a community.
1. Brainstorm (as a large group) what “places” you would find in a community. List these on chart paper. (Tie this in to use of symbols to represent these places.)
2. In small groups, students need to write a plan for their community that includes at least ten symbols and why they chose them. (Examples: buildings, roads, parks, parking lots, trees, and other small objects)
3. Groups will take their plan and recreate it using the computer program Neighborhood Map Machine. They will also enter in the Notebook a brief description of their community. Make sure groups save their maps for future use. (Saved maps can then be used in the Mystery Mode of the program and Slideshow.) Groups waiting to use the computer to create their map can work on the Bird’s-Eye View Map Activity from Lesson 1.
4. Each group needs to print a copy of the map and description for each group member and the teacher.

Enrichment Activity:
Students will create a 3D version of the map they created in Activity A.
1. Students print 3D models of their buildings and objects from their map (Print Goodies menu) and reproduce them on a heavy stock paper. Have the students then cut, fold, and paste to create their 3D objects.
2. Each group will recreate the roads, parks, lakes... on the large grid paper using the grids from their map as a guide.
3. Add buildings and other 3D objects to the grid.
4. Display

Assessments:
*Teacher observation
*Student projects
*Rubric



(Save 3D buildings and grids to use with Grid Coordinate lesson in Math.)


Lesson 3 - Compass Rose
Map Skills - Third Grade
Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary
June 28, 1999

Objectives:
*Recognize the four main directions of north, south, east, and west, and the intermediate directions of northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest.
*Use a compass rose to find directions on a map.

Overview:
Students identify compass directions in the classroom and on a map. They will use a compass rose to identify directions on a map, determine a route, give directions, and solve a mystery based on direction.

Resources Needed:
*Communities Around Us, Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997
*Neighborhood Map Machine, Tom Snyder Productions, 1997
*Computer (System 7.1 or higher, 2 megabytes of available RAM, 640 x 480 color monitor)
*LCD Projector

Time: 3 -4 periods

Materials:
*Copies for each student of compass rose ( found on page 90 of Neighborhood Map Machine guide book). Laminate if possible.
*Copies for each student of Directions-Mystery Map with text added by teacher.
*Copies for each group of Directions Extensions Map with text added by teacher.
*Text (Silver Burdett Ginn: Communities Around Us, Grade 3)
*Index cards for text activity

Introduction:
1. Introduce four main directions using activities in text.

Lesson:
1. Read pages M10 - M11 from text together. Discuss.
2. Hand out laminated copies of compass rose.
3. Play Simon Says with main directions, then add intermediate directions.

Activity:
Students will work in their small groups from Lesson One to complete a mystery using a compass rose.
1. Introduce Neighborhood Map Machine - Directions Mystery using a LCD projector is possible. Students need the Directions-Mystery Map activity sheet. Complete this together.
2. Using the Directions-Extension Map, each group will work to find the mystery location based on directional clues given in the program. Groups waiting to use the computer will work on the “What Direction Do I Go?” game explained on page M11 of the text.
3. Students will hand in their completed activity sheets.

Extension Activity:
Students use a map of their own to create a mystery using directional clues.

Assessments:
*Teacher Observation
*Student Product