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Grade: Elementary
Subject: other

#1472. Spider/Insect Unit

other, level: Elementary
Posted Thu Dec 30 17:40:49 PST 1999 by Susan Nixon (desertsky@arizonaone.com).
Cartwright School, Phoenix, USA
Materials Required: See lessons.
Activity Time: Minimum of 1 week theme.
Concepts Taught: See lessons.

Insects and Spiders/Using Eric Carle books

CONCEPTS

1. There are many kinds of insects. All insects have:
3 body parts
6 legs
3 or 4 life stages
Some insects have one or two pairs of wings.

2. Spiders are different from insects. Spiders have:
2 body parts
8 legs
3 life stages


OBJECTIVES DIRECTLY RELATED TO CONCEPTS

OBJECTIVE ONE: Students will investigate the characteristics of insects and generate a list of those characteristics.

ACTIVITIES: Students will make a K-W-L chart about insects.

Students will read or listen to The Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle.

Students will read or listen to The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle.

Students will list what they learned about insects from the words and the drawings in these books.

Students will work in cooperative learning groups with a set of books about insects. They will make a list in each group of what they find out about insects.

Coop. groups will compare lists and make a class lists of common characteristics for insects.

EVALUATION: Students will work in pairs to compile and illustrate a general fact book about in-sects, giving characteristics and citing examples.

OBJECTIVE TWO: Students will investigate the character-istics of spiders and generate a list of those characteristics.

ACTIVITIES: Students will make a K-W-L chart about spiders.

Students will read or listen to The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle.

Students will list what they learned about spiders from the words and the drawings in this book.

Students will work in cooperative learning groups with a set of books about spiders. They will make a list in each group of what they find out about spiders.

Coop. groups will compare lists and make a class lists of common characteristics for spiders.

EVALUATION: Students will work in pairs to compile and illustrate a general fact book about in-sects, giving characteristics and citing examples.

OBJECTIVE THREE: Students will compare and contrast insects and spiders.

ACTIVITIES: Students will make a t-chart showing the characteristics of spiders and insects. (Include life stages, body parts, legs, wings, etc.)

Students will make and label drawings of a variety of spiders and insects, using books available for reference. (Post on bulletin board)

EVALUATION: Students will categorize pictures (picture file, slides, drawings) of spiders and insects appropriately. (Bulletin board or game)


2ND GRADE LIFE SCIENCE OBJECTIVES
SOURCE: SCOPE AND SEQUENCE BOOK
CARTWRIGHT SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Student will demonstrate the ability to:

D. Identify animals and their importance.
1. Animal needs and ways to meet needs
2. Animal classification:
similarities & differences
(covered in concept objective #3)
3. Animal reproduction
4. Contrast/compare life cycles
5. Explain animal behavior
6. Adaptation to the environment
7. Determine animal importance to humans
a. Pets
b. Food
c. Other contributions


OBJECTIVES/SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

OBJECTIVE ONE: (Science) Students will analyze the needs that all living things have and apply that knowledge to discover the needs of insects and spiders. (Expanded skill)

ACTIVITIES: Students will brainstorm a list of needs of all living things. (studied previously)

Students will read spider and insect fact books.

Students will go on web hunts. They will observe webs for several days, without interfering with the spiders or the insects in them. Keep a journal of observations.

NOTE: Certain kinds of spiders may be kept in captivity, however, they generally die quickly. They do not always make webs once they are captive, and you must be careful to find insects for them if they are kept in an area where they cannot catch their own. When web hunting, WARN STUDENTS ABOUT POISONOUS SPIDERS. There are very few, but it is best if students are not studying black widow webs!

Students will create a ladybug environment in a jar. (Brainstorm what they think a ladybug environment needs - don't forget anything on the list!)

NOTE: Ladybugs may be caught (carefully!) about March each year in the desert. Remind children that you must let them go after a few days so that they don't die. They may also be ordered (M-F, 8-5 PST) from Insect Lore Products, 1-800-LIVEBUG (1-800-548-3284) Teach students the Ladybug, Ladybug, Fly Away Home chant and say it as you let the ladybugs go. (Students might make up their own verses to chant.)

Students will keep individual journals or a class journal of the observations they make of ladybugs. (See Appendix for class journal instructions.)


EVALUATION: Students will diagram an insect or spider environment, labeling the needs and how they are supplied. (Trio-ramas are good for this.)


OBJECTIVE TWO: (Science) Students will illustrate and share information on the life cycles of insects and spiders. (Expanded skill)

ACTIVITIES: Students will work in pairs to read and research books and magazines available on insects and spiders.

Students may observe an insect in nature and record observations.

Students will create reports on an insect or spider's life cycle, individually or in pairs, and schedule a time to present their reports to students interested in their insect or spider.

Students will create something to add to the life cycle bulletin board or table. (Picture, report, display)

Students will take the opportunity to listen to the reports fellow students are sharing, at least 50% of the time.

EVALUATION: Monitor student contributions to the study.


OBJECTIVE THREE: (Grammar) Students will study the use of adjectives and adverbs as modifiers, then use them in writing sentences about insects and spiders. (Introduced skill)

ACTIVITIES: Students will discuss words which describe nouns. (previously studied)

Students will conclude that words which tell what kind of or how many tell more details about nouns.

Students will determine that words referring to the five senses tell more about nouns. (How does something smell, look, taste, feel, sound?)

Students will discover that words which tell how something moves are adverbs.

Given a list of nouns having to do with insects and spiders, students will brainstorm a list of adjectives that can be used to describe the nouns. (Post word banks around classroom.)

Given a list of verbs having to do with insects and spiders, students will brainstorm a list of adverbs that can be used with the verbs. (Post word banks around classroom.)

In journals, students will write sentences telling what they have learned about spiders and/or insects, using adjectives and adverbs to expand ideas.

EVALUATION: Monitor journaling.


OBJECTIVE FOUR: (Writing) Students will develop paragraphs about spiders and insects, expressing complete thoughts and using adjectives and adverbs. (Introduced skill)

ACTIVITIES: Students will brainstorm a list of adjectives which could be used to describe how insects smell, look, and sound.

Students will brainstorm a list of adjectives which could be used to describe how spiders smell, look, and sound.

Students will brainstorm a list of adverbs which describe the movements of insects.

Students will brainstorm a list of adverbs which describe the movements of spiders.

Students will write in their journals, describing spiders using their five senses and words from the brainstormed lists. (Post word banks around the classroom.)

Students will write in their journals, describing insects using their five senses and words from the brainstormed lists. (Post word banks around the classroom.)

EVALUATION: Monitor student journaling.


OBJECTIVE FIVE: (Math) Students will use addition (Expanded skill) and bar graphing skills (Introduced skill) while studying spiders and insects.

ACTIVITIES: Students will record observations of insects and spiders during the week using tally marks on a t-chart. (Limit to cockroaches, brown spiders, daddy long legs (not true spiders), flies, ladybugs, or any 5 insects and spiders which are prevalent during the season you do these lessons.)


Students will add the numbers of each type of insect or spider observed during the week.

Students will set up a graph for the 5 types of beastie and graph the numbers correctly.

EVALUATION: Monitor and adjust student observation and counting process.
Monitor and display student graphs.

BULLETIN BOARDS

1. TITLE - Insects and Spiders - What Can You Add?

A. Place cutouts of an insect or two and a spider on different corners of the bulletin board. Draw a thick line down the middle of the board. You might add some black yarn to look like spider webbing on the spider side.
B. Provide a supply of drawing paper and writing paper.
C. As students discover facts about insects or spiders, encourage them to draw or write about their new knowledge.
D. After being checked by you, a student may staple the new information on the correct side of the bulletin board.

2. TITLE - Buzzzzzz Into Our Poet-tree!

A. Supply several poetry books, especially ones with poems about insects. After the first year, student made books are great for this center and bulletin board.
B. Provide shape paper for students to copy poems they find about insects (for poetry notebooks) or to write original poems. Butterfly, lady-bug, and fat spiders all make good shapes. (You may leave patterns and paper in the center and let the students trace and cut their own shape paper.) [See Appendix for some shapes.)
C. Students get teacher approval of nicely copied original work (great handwriting practice, and grade!) and then post on the poetry bulletin board.
D. Bulletin board has light blue background, green grass bottom, a brown tree in the middle, maybe a bush or flowers, and a few clouds.


3. TITLE - Stayin' Alive!

A. As students find out about the life cycle of insects and spiders, post this bulletin board as a place to display new knowledge. (This works great on a 4-sided refrigerator box!)
B. Divide the display area into 4 sections.
C. Label each section: Egg, Larva, Pupa, Adult
D. Students illustrate the various stages for insects and spiders they study and post them in the appropriate section.
E. Remind students that some insects don't have the pupa stage and that some larva look the same as the adult stage.