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Grade: 3-5
Subject: Music

#279. Animusic 1

Music, level: 3-5
Posted Fri Aug 14 08:41:25 PDT 2009 by Jeff Garrard (Jeff Garrard).
Animusic Education page
Animusic, Austin TX USA
Materials Required: TV and DVD player
Activity Time: 30-40 minutes
Concepts Taught: Music, pitch, melody, rhythm

These examples, developed by music teachers, correlate with items 6, 7 and 8 of the National Standards for Music Education.

Show students one or more of the videos from the Animusic 1 DVD then proceed with discussion and exercises.

PITCH:
Recognition of high and low sounds. Discuss which instruments are creating high pitches and which are creating low pitches. Identify when the higher and/or lower sounds enter a piece.
Consider the instrumentation of each musical selection.
- Which instruments are “pitched” and which are “unpitched”?
- Which sounds can you reproduce with your voice?


RHYTHM
What is the pulse grouping of this piece? Can you identify which instrument or instruments help you locate this?
Metronome effect; backbeat vs. beat (hi-hat); can you play these rhythms on a drum set? Can you maintain the pulse in your foot while clapping one of the other rhythms in your hands?

- What are the challenges associated with this activity?

- Can you find the underlying pulse of this piece? Does the use of rests, or silence, in the music make it difficult to find the pulse?

- Can you tap or clap the pulse?


MELODY

Use "Aqua Harp" as the basis for these discussions:

Recognition of a single line of melody introduced by the harp. How many times is this single line of melody played before another sound and instrument is introduced?

- Ask students if they notice how all subsequent instruments that “join in” are attached to the harp; provides a simultaneous visual and aural representation of how the entire piece is built on, and relates back to, a single line of melody.