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Grade: 1-2
Subject: Computer

#3015. Instructional Unit Integrating Technology

Computer, level: 1-2
Posted Mon Dec 15 16:35:32 PST 2008 by Lauren Checkeroski (Lauren Checkeroski).
Wayne State University, United States
Materials Required: Kidspiration, others (please see unit)
Activity Time: 1 week
Concepts Taught: Language Arts, technology

Instructional Unit Integrating Technology – Day 1


Content
With the help of the instructional software application Kidspiration, students will be able to identify passages that indicate setting, characters, problem (events), and solution in a story. They will be able to see what makes up a story and why it is considered one by using technology.

Objectives (Michigan)
R.NT.02.EG03 Begin to identify simple story elements in narrative text, such as
- problem
- setting (time and place)
- events
- characters
- sense of story events (beginning, middle, and end).
R.NT.02.EG02 Begin to become familiar with a variety of narrative genre including
—stories
—nursery rhymes
—poetry
—songs.
Michigan Technology Standards/Benchmarks:
• Students understand that technology is a tool to help complete a task.
• Students understand that technology is a source of information, learning, and entertainment.

Materials Needed
1. The book, "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak.
2. Classroom computer with Kidspiration software that can be projected onto the wall for everyone to see
3. A monster shaped cutout for each student. Printed on each "When I feel ________, I ________and then ___________."

Introduction
As a group, with the students sitting on a carpet in a circle, introduce the book “Where the Wild Things Are” to the children. Read the author and title; show the cover and first few pages of the book. Ask the children what they think the story might be about.

Development of Lesson (Procedures)
1. Read the book, inviting those students who may know it well to read along whenever they want to.
2. Ask, or suggest, if this is a "good story," an "interesting story," a "well-written story." Explain that we will now look at the elements, or parts of what makes up a “good story”.
3. Using the Kidspiration software on the computer, create a diagram that includes all the components of a “good story”. Put the title and author of the book in the center and branch off from that "Setting". Explain that the setting is where and when the story takes place and branch off from setting where the story took place. For each response refer back to the book saying "how does it tell us that?" and help the students remember a passage or a phrase. Repeat the process for "Characters," "Problem," "Events" and "Solution."
4. Tell the students that you're going to leave the chart up on computer for now, that it helps for our reading and writing to know what makes up a good story.

Accommodations/ Adaptations
For the student having trouble understanding the book, teacher assistants, paraprofessionals, and/or parent volunteers can assist teachers with helping the student. They could be there to go through each page and describe every word, idea, and picture in full detail. The book could be provided on tape, video, and as a big book with larger words and pictures if it is available for any student. The ESL student would have a translator or be able to read/listen to the book in another language. Print outs of the chart could also be provided for any student needing it.

Evaluation/ Assessment
Remind the students that Max was feeling wild and that caused a problem and other events to happen in the story. Ask: what are some other ways we can feel? Single out a response. Say: Could we take that feeling and make up a story like Mr. Sendak did? Ask: What do we need for a good story? When responses have included Setting, Characters, Problem, Events and Solution, begin with a second diagram using Kidspiration with these titles, and brainstorm ideas for each.

Closure
Ask again when Max was feeling wild, what did he do (acted wild, yelled at his mother, wore his wolf suit, etc.)? Have the students fill out their own bulletin board cut-out, a picture or shape stating: "When I Feel (emotion), I (action) and then (this happens)." They are putting together in a very simple way, the beginning elements of an original story. Either now, or when the bulletin board is up, you can individually ask students to come up with an idea for a solution. A simpler activity would be to limit this to "when I feel wild, I ________".

Lesson Extensions
Students could take this idea home with them and ask family members the same question: “When I feel (emotion), I (action) and then (this happens).” Have students think of other individuals (superheroes, monsters, characters in their favorite stories) that act out when they feel a certain emotion. Do these individuals do the right thing? Students would be given the opportunity to use Kidspiration in the classroom or as an extra credit assignment at home to create their own web diagram on a story of their choosing.

Bibliography
Szabo, Deborah. St. Joseph College. Lessons Plan Page. Elements of a Story “Where the Wild Things Are”. http://www.lessonplanspage.com/LAWildThingsStoryElementsK2.htm

When I Feel
__________,
I__________
And then
___________.

Instructional Unit Integrating Technology – Day 2

Content
Students will learn to use picture clues as a valid and effective strategy in reading comprehension.

Objectives (Michigan)
R.NT.02.EG04 Begin to identify why authors write and how authors/illustrators use pictures and illustrations to support the understanding of settings and characters
R.NT.02.EG05 Begin to respond to multiple texts by discussing, drawing, and/or writing to reflect, make meaning, and make connections
Michigan Technology Standards/Benchmarks:
• Students understand that technology is a source of information, learning, and entertainment

Materials Needed
1. Cardboard/construction paper to make an accordian style book
2. Crayons and markers
3. The book, “Yo! Yes!” by Chris Raschka

Introduction
As a group, with the students sitting on a carpet in a circle, introduce the book “Yo! Yes!” to the children. Read the author and title; show the cover and first few pages of the book. Ask the children what they think the story might be about. Explain that the illustrations of a story are sometimes as important as the story itself, and that using the illustrations to improve comprehension is recognized as an effective and valid reading strategy.

Development of Lesson (Procedures)
1. Read the book to the class. Do not allow the students to see the pictures or the cover while you are reading the story. Use appropriate inflection while reading, but do not use different voices for the two characters.
2. When finished, ask the students to elaborate upon what they think the story was about. Highlight any differences in opinion amongst the students. Explain that “Yo! Yes!” is an excellent example of a story that actually needs pictures in order for its readers to fully comprehend. Explain that stories like this demonstrate how effective the use of visual clues can be in reading comprehension.
3. Re-read “Yo! Yes!” showing the pictures to the students as its being read. When finished, ask students to elaborate upon what they think the story was about. Highlight the similarities in opinions this time.
4. Have students create an accordion book by folding cardboard/construction paper in half lengthwise and crease. Then fold accordion style into equal parts. Ask students to write a quick, six-scene story that is dependent upon both words and pictures in the formation of meaning.
5. Share several stories with the class, highlighting the importance of the illustrations in determining meaning.
6. If there is time, ask students to share their stories with a partner

Accommodations/ Adaptations
For the student having trouble understanding the book, teacher assistants, paraprofessionals, and/or parent volunteers can assist teachers with helping the student. They could be there to go through each page and describe every word, idea, and picture in full detail. The book could be provided on tape, video, and as a big book with larger words and pictures if it is available for any student. The ESL student would have a translator or be able to read/listen to the book in another language. For the student having difficulty writing, he could dictate how he wants his picture drawn on paper to another student that likes to draw in order to document

Closure
Ask the students to look through the classroom library for a book in which illustrations could be used in determining meaning. Ask several students to share the book they have chosen with the class, explaining how the pictures might aid in comprehension. The teacher may have to model the first story. Ask students to share their choices with a partner while explaining how the illustration might aid in comprehension. After explaining the proper and fair use of the classroom computer, have it already open to http://www.liveandlearn.com/bigsml.html and have students watch and interact with this animated picture book.

Evaluation/ Assessment
Evaluate the students’ stories by determining if the illustrations serve as effective visual clues to the story's meaning. Using anecdotal notes, evaluate students’ use of visual clues while reading on a daily basis.

Lesson Extensions
For students who experience difficulty with the concept of visual clues, select several stories that include challenging vocabulary words that are identified through the story's illustrations. Ask the students to read these stories, either independently, in shared reading, or as part of a reading circle. As they read, ask them to use the illustrations to determine the meaning of the new vocabulary words. Allow the students to read through their classmates’ stories, looking for ways in which their illustrations help improve comprehension.

Bibliography
http://ericir.syr.edu/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Language_Arts/Reading/RDG0020.html
http://www.liveandlearn.com/bigsml.html

Instructional Unit Integrating Technology – Day 3

Content
Students discuss how passwords are like keys and why it is important to have a password that isn't easy to guess. Students discuss the concept of non-identifying information and basic ideas for what makes up a good password.

Objectives (Michigan)
Michigan Technology Standards/Benchmarks:
• Students discuss advantages and disadvantages of using technology
• Students recognize that using a password helps protect the privacy of information

Materials Needed
1. A classroom computer that can be projected onto a television monitor or projector
2. Password PowerPoint presentation
3. 2 locks and 2 key rings with lots of keys on each ring (the first key ring and lock should have no identifying marks on the keys and no external marks on the lock to identify which key unlocks it, the second lock should be a very distinct color, and there should be a key on the second key ring that obviously unlocks the lock)
4. Whiteboard and markers, or chalkboard and chalk

Introduction
Invite two students to come up to the front of the class and tell them they will be racing to see who can open the locks first. Discuss why the second lock was opened first. Using a subtle identifier that you haven't revealed to the class, find the key that opens the first lock. Explain that although one key was much easier to find, they both open their locks just as easily and they are both unique to their locks alone.

Development of Lesson (Procedures)
Use the Password PowerPoint Presentation to go through the lesson on passwords and why they are important to everyone and useful in the effective use of technology.

Accommodations/ Adaptations
The Password PowerPoint presentation can be printed onto paper for any student that would find it easier to read. The font and pictures on the presentation can be enhanced for the visually impaired student. A translator will be available to the ESL student should he need it.

Closure
Discuss with students that we use passwords for a variety of things. It is important to protect our things and ourselves.

Evaluation/ Assessment
Anecdotal notes will be documented to assure all students took part during the Password PowerPoint presentation.

Lesson Extensions
Have students discuss with parents what they use passwords for. Is there some things the students don’t want their brothers or sisters to see that they might want to protect with a password? What items at home need passwords?

Bibliography
http://ncmec.vo.llnwd.net/o15/downloads/print/34password1.pdf
http://ncmec.vo.llnwd.net/o15/downloads/print/34password2.pdf
http://www.netsmartzkids.org/tunes/index.htm
Instructional Unit Integrating Technology – Day 4

Content
Using a Web Quest, students will be able to see how useful technology is. They will be able to identify many Internet resources and see how helpful it can be to help them with school tasks. They will also be able to locate websites for books they may want to read in the future.

Objectives (Michigan)
R.NT.02.EG01 Begin to become familiar with classic and contemporary literature
—recognized for quality and literary merit
—reflecting our common heritage as well as cultures from around the world.
R.NT.02.EG02 Begin to become familiar with a variety of narrative genre including
—stories
—nursery rhymes
—poetry
—songs.
Michigan Technology Standards/Benchmarks:
• Students identify common uses of information and communication technologies
• Students discuss advantages and disadvantages of using technology
• Students understand that technology is a tool to help complete a task
• Students understand that technology is a source of information, learning, and entertainment

Materials Needed
1. Classroom computer
2. The Web quest, “BE A WEB SITE SLEUTH!”

Introduction
Discuss with the students what they use their home computer for. What do their parents use it for? Could they use their computer to help them with their homework? Could they use the Internet to find books they want to read? Are there books on the computer they could read instead of going out and buying a book?

Development of Lesson (Procedures)
1. Inform students about the proper use of the classroom computer. It is for all of us to share and we want to treat it with care so we are able to use it as often as we can.
2. Inform students about the Web Quest they will be working on. They will be working with a partner and discovering things that are located on the Internet. They will find sites that may help them with their homework and see books they may want to read in the future.
3. Each group will visit the web quest: http://www.yorkville.k12.il.us/webquests/webqwagner/webqswagner.html#Task
4. Every student will complete the tasks at the end of the Web Quest.

Accommodations/ Adaptations
The Web Quest will be provided in larger text format for the special needs learner with a visual impairment. There will be a translator available to assist the ESL student if anything is not understood. Extra time will be available for the special needs student that needs it. Extra help from others can also be provided to him.

Closure
As a large group discussion, the students will talk about what they thought was the most helpful when they explored this web quest. Did they discover information they never knew before? Was there something they want to know more about? Do they think the Internet is a useful tool? Did they have any problems when they used their web quest? And was there anything they didn’t like?

Evaluation/ Assessment
Seeing if all charts are complete, if graphs are done properly, if proper use of the classroom computer was used, and if effective teamwork had taken place with partners will complete the students’ assessment.

Lesson Extensions
The websites visited during the web quest will be in a newsletter going home at the end of the week so parents can help students get onto them at home. They will be able to share the following week anything new they discovered, if anyone at home helped them, and if they struggled with anything.

Bibliography
http://www.yorkville.k12.il.us/webquests/webqwagner/webqswagner.html#Task



Instructional Unit Integrating Technology - Day 5

Content
This final day of activities brings all the ideas of the whole week together to complete the unit. Students will write their own book and will include a problem, middle, and end, characters, settings, time, places, title, author, illustrations, and important details. This story will be about themselves and any adventure they have been through. They will use technology to make this story look professional.

Objectives
R.NT.02.EG04 Begin to identify why authors write and how authors/illustrators use pictures and illustrations to support the understanding of settings and characters
R.NT.02.EG03 Begin to identify simple story elements in narrative text, such as
- problem
— setting (time and place)
- events
—characters
—sense of story events (beginning, middle, and end).
R.NT.02.EG05 Begin to respond to multiple texts by discussing, drawing, and/or writing to reflect, make meaning, and make connections
Michigan Technology Standards/Benchmarks:
• Students understand that technology is a tool to help complete a task
• Students understand that technology is a source of information, learning, and entertainment
• Students identify common uses of information and communication technologies

Materials Needed
1. Classroom Computer
2. Digital Camera
3. Paper
4. Binders

Introduction
As a group, re-inform students what they have learned throughout the week. They’ve learned what exactly forms a good story and how to create one. They’ve learned ways to create a good story and how to use technology to do just that.

Development of Lesson (Procedures)
1. Inform students that they will write a story about an event in their lives. Using a digital camera, the teacher will photograph them for the cover of their book.
2. Students will need to make a rough draft of their story. They will be able to use inventive spelling. The student will dictate the story later if writing is incomprehensible and the teacher will transcribe it.
3. The students will need to type their work on pre-made templates that include space for an illustration. Students will need to have 5-10 pages in their book.
4. Inform students to do their very best work. These books will be put on display in the classroom for their peers to learn more about them and will also later be put in their portfolios. The students will be given plenty of time in class to complete them but will be given the opportunity to finish them for homework as well.

Accommodations/ Adaptations
Students would be able to include photographs of themselves instead of having to draw pictures. The teacher, paraprofessional, older students, or teacher assistant will help any special needs learner type, write sentences, and draw pictures. More time will be given to any special needs learner to complete the assignment if needed. The computer screen can also be modified with larger text for the special needs learner with a visual impairment. The brightness of the screen can also be modified.

Closure
The students will orally present their books to the class. They will be able to learn something new about their peers and see that they are capable of making their own book about themselves.

Evaluation/ Assessment
Following the checklist provided, the books will be graded. They will need to meet a criteria and a set of important information must be included.

Lesson Extensions
Students will also be able to read their books to older students in the school. The older students could help them with this activity and guide them through making correct letters, sentences, and punctuations throughout their books. Students can also use the digital camera to record themselves reciting their story or putting on a play of their story. These can be watched during class and/or at parent teacher conferences.

A Story About Me Checklist

Criteria Yes or No?
Title
Author
Illustrations with color
Characters easily identifiable
Technology was used properly
The beginning letter of the sentences has a capital letter
There is a period at the end of sentences
Oral presentation given
Able to identify a beginning middle and end


9 Yes’s = EXCELLENT JOB!
8 Yes’s, 1 No = Good Job!
7 Yes’s, 2 No’s = Ok!
6 Yes’s, 3 No’s = Try harder next time!
5 Yes’s, 4 No’s = Is this your very best work?
4 Yes’s, 5 No’s = Ask for help next time you are having trouble.
3 or less Yes’s = A conference with the teacher may be needed.