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Grade: Elementary
Subject: other

#3705. FolkTales Thematic Unit

other, level: Elementary
Posted Sat Mar 18 14:01:43 PST 2006 by Jacqueline Carter (luvmypiper@yahoo.com).
UCA, student teacher, Clinton, Ar, USA
Materials Required: provided on each lesson plan
Activity Time: 5 day thematic unit
Concepts Taught: reading, writing, math, science, social studies

Day 1: Lesson 1
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format


Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Choral Reading: “The Three Little Pigs” Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Today we are going to start learning about folk tales. We will be studying different folk tales all week. Friday we are going to have a folk tale party and get to view all of our work that we’ve done. So let’s work hard so we can show our parents how good we are doing. We are starting with reading “The Three Little Pigs”. Does anyone know that story? Of course you do, that’s because a folk tale is a story that has been around a long time and is usually told as oral stories that have been passed down from generation to generation. Let’s begin by reading out of my big book, make sure you can see. After I read a line, I will look at you and then you read the line back to me. Okay, ready?

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT participate in choral reading.
SWBAT participate in an informal discussion.
SWBAT answer comprehension questions about “The Three Little Pigs”.
SWBAT summarize the story to write a friendly letter.
SWBAT organize the sequence of the story in their letter.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
OV.1.2.9 Participate in formal and informal discussions about a variety of topics including school events.
W.4.2.4 Organize writing appropriately (i.e., sequence, main idea and detail, cause and effect, etc.)
W.5.2.1 Write for other people (i.e., parents, relatives, friends, teachers, and authors)
W.5.2.7 Write thank you notes, friendly letters (identifying the five parts), and invitations
R.9.2.12 Summarize major points of a text

Procedures:
1. I will first introduce the Folk Tales unit and that we will begin by reading “The Three Little Pigs”. I will have a big book made with colored pictures on each page.
2. The students will be asked to sit on the carpet for a close knit environment.
3. I will read a small section of text and have the students read it back aloud.
4. After reading the story I will ask comprehension questions.
5. As the question/answer session winds down I will direct my students back to their desks and have two students distribute the letter writing guide.
6. I will explain that we are going to pretend that we live in the three little pigs’ neighborhood. We are going to write a letter to a friend describing what has been going on in our neighborhood.
7. I will explain that as the form provides we start friendly letters with ‘Dear (friends name), and then we write the body of our letter that contains a hello and descriptions of what has been going on in the neighborhood. We always end in something like ‘Your Friend,’; space down and over and sign authors name.
8. As the students are writing I will monitor student writing and give guidance when needed.
9. Last, I will take volunteers to read their letter and review sequencing.

Materials required:
• Teacher made big book of “The Three Little Pigs” retold by Carrie Mapes and Judith Gold. (Pattern in appendix)
• Worksheet of letter writing format to guide students in writing a friendly letter. (See appendix)

Grouping for instruction:
I will use whole group, teacher guided/independent writing.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will use choral reading, question/answer, guided or independent writing are the strategies that will be used.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Reading: 15 minutes
Writing: 10 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
For any students with special needs I will pair them with a more advanced student to keep them on track. I will also assist more in the writing process for these students. For struggling readers I will have them seated in the front of the group so I can monitor their choral reading.

Evaluation:
I will rate the student written letter using the 1-4 scale as used on the Benchmarks.
The letter will also be put in the students’ folktale portfolio.

Closure:
I will take volunteers to read their letters out loud. I will ask the class if their sequencing was the same as theirs. I will review the sequence in the story. I will ask the students if the sequence matters when we are telling a story and explain how important it is.


Day 1: Lesson 2
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Math: Elapsed Time Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Learning Objectives:
SWBAT determine amount of time passed as related in word problems.
SWBAT use a number line to calculate elapsed time.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
M.13.2.3 Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time or end time
NO.3.2.1Develop strategies for basic addition facts
NO.2.2.6 Demonstrate various addition and subtraction relationships (property) to solve problems in contextual situations involving whole numbers
NO.2.2.1 Count on (forward) and back (backward) on a number line and a 100’s chart starting at any whole number up to 100

Procedures:
1. I will begin by reviewing telling time to the hour.
2. I will then introduce counting time that has passed or elapsed time. I will explain that the starting time or the ending time has no bearing on how much time has passed.
3. We will be using a “time number line” to count on or back from hour to hour.
4. Several examples will be modeled in class with the students. I will gauge their understanding as we work the problems together.
5. Once I know that they have an understanding I will hand out the practice word problems for the students to work with a partner.
6. We will focus on counting on and counting back. I will go desk to desk to answer as I read each question out loud to keep every student on track.
7. I will answer questions and guide student work.
8. Last, I will ask them how these word problems related to the “Three Little Pigs that we read earlier.

Materials required:
• Teacher made word problems involving elapsed time relating to the story of “The Three Little Pigs”. (See appendix)

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group instruction and partnered student work.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will modeling how to calculate elapsed time and read each word problem out loud as the students do the problems independently. I will scaffold as necessary. This should keep them on task and help avoid confusion as I can answer any questions as we go along as a class.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Whole group instruction: 15 minutes
Individual work: 12 minutes
Closure: 3 minutes

Special Consideration:
For any students with special needs I will pair them with a more advanced student to help them.

Evaluation:
I will grade the math story problems. I will use this exercise to gauge what area of elapsed time needs more explaining. We will practice calculating the passage of time and time telling throughout the folktale unit (in our morning journal) and/or until the skill is mastered.


Closure:
So does anyone know if it matters if there is a beginning or end time? So what elapsed time means is how long it took right? Do you see where I got the time questions out of the story of the “Three Little Pigs” that we read earlier? Are there anymore questions about how to calculate elapsed time? Is everyone done?


Day 1: Lesson 3
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Discovering a Food Chain Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
For science today we are going to learn about the food chain represented in “The Three Little Pigs”. Does anyone know what a food chain is? How about the word predator, consumer or producer? I am going to show you how we fit into a food chain and how everyone and everything needs each other in a food chain. Well let’s learn!

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT understand where humans fit in the food web.
SWBAT create a collage representing a common food chain.
Students will examine and discuss a landscape painting and identify the food chain elements.
SWBAT define the words predator, consumer, producer, food chain, and interdependence.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
LS.2.9. Students will define and describe a food chain.
A.3.1. Understand and relate how art is used to communicate ideas and feelings to others.
LS.2.10. Students will understand that organisms are interdependent.

Procedures:
1. I will begin by talking about the food chain represented in the story “The Three Little Pigs”. I will have the character patterns for puppets to show as a visual, then use the scientific terms of predator, consumer and producer to label the characters in the story.
2. Second I will ask the class: “are wolves’ predators, consumers, or producers”? I will remind them that in the book the big bad wolf ate the little pigs.
3. We will then discover the definitions of a food chain, predator, consumer, and producer.
4. I will give examples of common food chains such as an eagle, mouse, and grain. And explain that all the parts of a food chain depend on each other. We all depend on each other.
5. I will point out that we, as humans are part of the food chain. Our place would be something like human, cow, grass. Or human, lettuce. Because we eat both plants and animals.
6. I will have a couple of scenic pictures of animals in nature and have the students point out the roles of the food web being represented.
7. After the discussion students will return to their seats and be given a sheet of construction paper and magazines.
8. I will instruct them to cut out pictures of animals or people, plants, etc. to create a scene that includes a predator, consumer, and a producer. They should have each cutout labeled what role it is filling in their food chain.

Materials required:
• 1-3 Scenic pictures of animals in nature.
• Character patterns from “The Three Little Pigs”. (See appendix)
• Construction paper
• Magazines with animal, people and plant pictures.
• Glue
• Scissors

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group on carpet for close knit environment and instruction.
Students will be in small groups for collage making at desks.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will explain the roles of consumers and producers using the story “The Three Little Pigs” as read earlier to link and refresh their prior knowledge. A landscape scene will be shown to students and will point out and discuss the food chain roles depicted.
After instruction students will be sent to do a small group activity of making a collage of a scene of producers and consumers that they will label.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 15 minutes
Collage making: 15 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
For any students with visual difficulties I will seat them in the front so that they can view the visuals of the lesson.

Evaluation:
I will grade the collage based on the 1-4 benchmark scale. Each collage should have three subjects correctly labeled with their food chain role.

Closure:
Does anyone want to show us their collage? What can you tell me about a food chain? What is the favorite thing you learned today? So what is a predator? A consumer? A producer? What does interdependence mean? Okay, we are going to hang these up to display and we will also add them to your portfolio. These will be graded so make sure you have your name on the back.


Day 2: Lesson 1
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Reading: “Jack and the Beanstalk” Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Today in our reading group we are going to read “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Each one of us will take turns reading. Make sure you follow along.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT listen to peers read and follow along.
SWBAT read when called on.
SWBAT write a new version of a folk tale.
SWBAT summarize major points of a text.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
OV.2.2.4 Listen to literature and respond appropriately, including comparing/ contrasting and extending the text
W.4.2.4 Organize writing appropriately (i.e., sequence, main idea and detail, cause and effect, etc.)
W.5.2.8 Write retellings of fairy tales and folk tales
R.9.2.12 Summarize major points of a text

Procedures:
1. I will rotate my reading groups and each student will take a turn reading aloud parts of “Jack and the Beanstalk”.
2. I will ask some comprehension and sequencing questions for a short discussion
3. I will distribute the long green paper (beanstalks) and will direct students to write “Jack and the Beanstalk” by (their name).
4. I will explain that they need to start with the beginning, middle and then end. The only part of the story that will be changed is the end.
5. The beginning and middle will be summarized.
6. When the writing is done the students can add their new spelling words to their vocabulary boxes.
7. Students will be sent to their desk to work on the writing independently as I rotate reading groups. When they finish they will work in learning centers.
8. On each card the student will have one spelling word and on the back will be a sentence with the word or a picture of the word.
9. Spelling words: bean, cow, trade, magic, dawn, sprout, bird, brick, and bread. Challenge words: climb, and mother.

Materials required:
• Book: “Jack and the Beanstalk”.
• Light green paper cut into long (11-12”) skinny (3”)strips for students to write their version of “Jack and the Beanstalk” on a ‘beanstalk’.
• Vocabulary boxes.

Grouping for instruction:
I will use small group reading and instruction on writing assignment. Teacher explain the writing assignment to be done independently or with a partners help if needed. Vocabulary boxes will be done independently.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
The teacher will listen to small reading groups read aloud “Jack and the Beanstalk”. Each student will rewrite the story by summarization and change the ending of the story. If help is needed they may ask a classmate. As the students finish they will be directed to get out their vocabulary boxes and do them independently. When they finish the vocabulary they will go to learning centers.

Activities Planned:
Small reading groups: 40 minutes
Writing (independent/partner): 10 minutes
Vocabulary boxes (independent): 12 minutes
Learning Center: depends on student pace

Special Consideration:
Students with special needs will be guided during the writing assignment with an advanced student or teacher. The last reading group will do DEAR instead of writing and will do their writing assignment during the class DEAR time.

Evaluation:
I will assess the students writing sample using the 1-4 scale as used on the bench mark.

Closure:
After I am finished with the reading groups we will review our vocabulary words. I will then ask students to share their beanstalk stories. We will discuss the summarization and sequencing that had to be done.


Day 2: Lesson 2
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Magic Bean Sorting and Classification Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Today we are going to focus on sorting/classifying beans which are also a type of seed. We can classify according to size, color, touch, likes, dislikes, type and many other ways.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT sort and classify different types of dry beans from three or more different characteristics.
SWBAT follow teacher directions.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
A.4.2.1 Sort, classify, and label objects by three or more attributes in more than one way.

Procedures:
1. The students will be instructed on how people, animals, plants, and objects can be classified.
2. The teacher will show examples of sorting beans into different groups by showing index cards with an appropriate label and beans matching those labels glued to them.
3. Teacher created sorting form and beans will be distributed by volunteers.
4. The assignment will be explained and the first three sections will be gone through with the teacher.
5. The last three sections will be done independently without teacher help.
6. The teacher will walk around, answer questions and guide students through each square on their form until done.

Materials required:
• Six different types of dried beans, enough for students to have several of each.
• Index cards with examples of sorted pasta glued to them. Example: curly (label), glue curly pasta on card.
• Teacher created bean sorting form. (See Appendix)

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will model my index cards with category labels with the appropriate pasta glued to them. I will explain that they will do this with beans. I will use scaffolding in releasing students gradually to do sorting independently.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 5 minutes
Sorting/Gluing: 15 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students with motor difficulties can be paired with another student to help glue and handle small beans.

Evaluation:
Student bean glued sorting will be taken up and graded on a 0-100% scale.

Closure:
We will set sorting sheets aside to dry. The teacher will then discuss how everything can be sorted into categories. Laundry, rocks, dishes, money, t.v. shows, animals, humans are some examples to be given. How would laundry be sorted? According to color, type of fabric, or whose clothes it is? What about t.v. shows? We could sort them into educational, kids, cartoons, and adult shows. So we can sort just about anything can’t we. Later this week we will be sorting again.


Day 2: Lesson 3
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Planting a Bean Seed Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Remember how Jacks seed was planted in the “Jack and the Beanstalk”? Well that was a magic bean and it’s usually not that easy. Does anyone want to try to grow a bean? Well to grow a plant we have to know some things about them. Like how to plant them, what they need and what the parts of a plant are. Are you ready to learn so we can plant our beans?

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT follow directions to properly plant a bean.
SWBAT name the four basic plant parts.
SWBAT explain the needs of a plant; sunlight, water, and soil.
SWBAT explain that bean seeds produce bean seeds and so on.
In observing their plants, students will identify the seed, seed coat, stem, leaves, blooms, and beans.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
LS.2.10. Understand that organisms are interdependent.
LS.2.3. Identify and investigate the functions of body systems in organisms.
LS.2.7. Understand that offspring are similar to their parents.

Procedures:
1. Instruction on plants and their needs will be given. The three needs of a plant are soil, water, and sunlight.
2. The four parts are roots, stem, leaves, and flowers.
3. Each component will be elaborated on and explained.
4. As the instruction is given the teacher will draw pictures on a white board showing each component to help the visual learners.
5. At the end of the discussion the teacher drawn (done one step at a time as each part is explained) example of the art project should be left on the board to help students.
6. Students will be sent to their desk to complete a drawing of roots, stem, leaves, and a flower (fruit or vegetable) and label each part. Students will also draw and color a sun and water source. Students are to also color and label the soil.
7. While students are working on their artwork small groups of three will come to a planting station to plant their beans with me.
8. In small groups each student will be plant two beans in a cup with teacher assistance.
9. Each child will plant pinto beans. They will keep daily records of the plants' progress. (Ex: date planted, date sprouted, daily height of plant, etc.)
Materials required:
• Pictures of different types of seeds sprouting, growing, with parts of plant labeled. A few different types of plants should be shown.
• 1 Styrofoam cup for each student
• Potting soil
• 2 bean seeds for each student
• Water
• Sheet of drawing paper for each student

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group on the carpet for a close knit environment. Small groups will be used for each student to get to plant their seed. Individual artwork of a plant with its four basic parts and three need sources labeled.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will draw pictures of the plant parts and needs as I am instructing to help visual learners and with the assignment that follows. I will work with small groups instructing on how to plant so that each student gets direct attention and guidance for a better understanding of how plants work.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 15 minutes
Assignment/Planting: 20 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students with visual impairments will be sat close to the teacher to view pictures and drawings. Students with motor difficulties will be helped at planting station by the teacher.

Evaluation:
Artwork of the students will be graded on a 1-4 scale as used on the benchmarks based on drawing the four plant parts and labeling each one.
Student will also submit their journals of daily observations when the bean plants are done growing.

Closure:
I love the artwork you all have done. Would anyone like to share theirs, I will hold it up. Where is the water source in this picture? Is there soil? Can you see and name the plant parts. Good job class, I am so proud of the way you have followed directions and worked hard today. We will be having an awards presentation will be held with prizes given for tallest plant and the most productive plant when we decide we are through growing them. Now one at a time, as I call on you can you go hang your plant artwork around the class. I will have it down to put in your portfolio for Friday but we can enjoy them for a few days.

Day 3: Lesson 1
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Guided Reading: “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Does anyone know what folk tale we will be reading today? Can you think of what this story might be about by reading the title? What do think this magic pebble will do? Let’s read and find out. Follow along in your book as I read.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT read silently as teacher reads book.
SWBAT respond to comprehension questions from the story.
SWBAT make an itty bitty book about them and a magic pebble.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
OV.1.2.12 Ask and answer questions
OV.2.2.3 Follow oral directions with three or four steps
W.4.2.4 Organize writing appropriately (i.e., sequence, main idea and detail, cause and
effect, etc.)
W.4.2.17 Select pieces for a writing portfolio that demonstrate growth
W.7.2.1Develop a beginning, middle, and end to a story

Procedures:
1. The teacher will read aloud “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” to the class as they follow along in their own copy.
2. After reading comprehension questions will be asked.
3. Then students will be asked what they would do if they had a magic pebble. Volunteers will be taken to listen what they might wish for.
4. Students will then be asked to follow directions to make an itty bitty book. The students will then be told to write their story of what they would do with their magic pebble.
5. The cover should have their own title and name as the author.
6. On a sheet of notebook paper the students will write an outline that includes the beginning, middle, and end of their book. They will use this as a guide to write their book. The students will be guided through this. They should not use complete sentences, use a bulleted list.
7. They should write how they found it and what wishes they have made or will make with it.

Materials required:
• Steig, William. “ Sylvester and the Magic Pebble.” The Trumpet Club; New York, NY 1969.
• Notebook paper
• Paper for book making

Grouping for instruction:
• Whole group, guided reading
• Individual writing

Teaching methods/Strategies:
Whole group, guided reading, group book making, individual writing.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Reading: 15 minutes
Book Making: 15 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students unable to make an itty bitty book will be given a teacher made itty bitty book.

Evaluation:
The itty bitty book writing will be graded based on the 1-4 benchmark scale. This piece will be included in their year-long portfolio.

Closure:
Does anyone want to share their itty bitty book? What kind of wishes did you decide to make? If I had a magic pebble I would wish for all the children in the world to excel through school and graduate college. I would wish for world hunger to end, a cure for AIDS, and freedom around the world. Do you think you would have trouble like Sylvester? What could go wrong? Would you like to make more itty bitty books? Remember when you are in the reading center that you can make a itty bitty book for a book report. During our science lesson after lunch we will be learning about rocks, just like Sylvester liked to do.


Day 3: Lesson 2
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Discovering Rocks: Rock Hunt Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Sylvester liked to collect rocks. There are three types of rocks and we are going to learn about each type. After learning about the types of rocks we are going to discuss and try to see if we can discover the type of rock that Sylvester found. Does anyone know what kinds of rocks there are?

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT identify and compare local rocks and identify the type of rock it is.
SWBAT name the three types of rocks and their characteristics.
SWBAT communicate rock hunt results on a graph.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
PS 1.3. Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations (graphs, charts, and writings).
PS.1.1. Students can group objects according to the objects’ properties.
OV.2.2.3 Follow oral directions with three or four steps.

Procedures:
1. I will begin by showing them a picture of sedimentary rocks and explaining the basic characteristics.
2. Then I will do the same for igneous rocks. Rocks that are made by fire.
3. I will then show pictures of metamorphic rocks and explain those characteristics. Metamorphic rocks are rocks that have "morphed" into another kind of rock. These rocks were once igneous or sedimentary rocks.
4. I will then show the class local rocks from each category of rocks.
5. We will then line up and go outside to have a class rock hunt. Each student should try and find the three different types of rocks.
6. Once back inside we will make a chart of the rocks we found that will show how many of each type of rock we found as a class.
7. Each student will write down two facts about each type of rock that we learned about today.

Materials required:
• Pictures of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks.
• Examples of each type of rock.
• Graphic organizer worksheet

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group instruction, individual rock hunting, and writing exercise.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will use pictures and actual rocks for visual learners. I will also draw a graphic organizer and write down highlights of each type of rock on the board as I instruct. I am incorporating a rock hunt to get students active and excited about rock collecting and study.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 15 minutes
Rock hunt: 10 minutes
Assignment: 5 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
For students with mobility problems I will help them pick up and collect rocks on the hunt.

Evaluation:
I will grade the students’ graphic organizer of two facts for each type of rock. Assignment will be graded using the 1-4 benchmark scale.

Closure:
Can anyone tell me some facts you wrote on your paper about rocks? What did we find out about the rocks in our area? Do you think you can find different types at home? Now that you have learned about the types of rocks, sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic you might want to start collecting rocks. Is anyone going to be like Sylvester?

Day 3: Lesson 3
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Math: Elapsed Time Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Do you remember finding out the elapsed time using “The Three Little Pigs”? Do we need to review how to find out elapsed time? Well that’s what we are going to do today, review elapsed time.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT determine amount of time passed as related in word problems.
SWBAT use a number line to calculate elapsed time.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
M.13.2.3 Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time or end time
NO.3.2.1Develop strategies for basic addition facts
NO.2.2.6 Demonstrate various addition and subtraction relationships (property) to solve problems in contextual situations involving whole numbers

Procedures:
1. I will begin by reviewing telling time to the hour.
2. I will then review counting time that has passed or elapsed time. I will remind them that that the starting time or the ending time has no bearing on how much time has passed.
3. We will be using a moveable big clock to count on or back from hour to hour.
4. We will go over the problems from the previous lesson and the answers.
5. Several examples will be modeled in class with the students.
6. I will hand out the practice word problems for the students to work with their moveable clock.
7. We will focus on counting on and counting back. I will go desk to desk to answer as I read each question out loud to keep every student on track.
8. I will answer questions and guide student work.
9. Last, I will ask them how these word problems related to the “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” that we read earlier.

Materials required:
• Big clock for teacher use to model time passage.
• Class set of moveable clocks for use with assignment.
• Teacher made word problems involving the “Sylvester and the Magic Pebble” book.

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will use whole group instruction for reviewing elapsed time. I will use a big clock to model time passage. Students will also use moveable clocks to help with calculating elapsed time. Teacher guidance as needed through assignment.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Review: 10 minutes
Assignment: 10 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students struggling with elapsed time concept will be paired with a more fluent student.

Evaluation:
Student word problems will be graded on a 0-100% scale. Proficiency for this concept is 90%.
If there are only a couple students struggling with the concept I will tutor them independently. If there are a large amount of students not grasping the concept I will re-teach the lesson.

Closure:
Did working with the moveable clocks help today? Did you like the number line better? Does anyone have any questions? Do you see where I got the word problems out of the story of Sylvester? Remember that beginning and end time do not matter when we are figuring out elapsed time.

Day 4: Lesson 1
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Independent Reading: “Little Red Riding Hood.” Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Can I have two volunteers to pass out our reading books? Today we will read “Little Red Riding Hood” independently. I will walk around the classroom to monitor your reading. If you get stuck on a word raise your hand and I will help you.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT read independently.
SWBAT answer comprehension questions in a class discussion.
SWBAT describe the main characters by writing a diamante poem.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
OV.1.2.10 Tell and retell stories incorporating the use of descriptive language and elements of a story
W.5.2.9 Write simple quatrains and shape poetry
OV.2.2.3 Follow oral directions with three or four steps

Procedures:
1. Each student will read “Little Red Riding Hood” independently.
2. We will then have a class discussion about the text.
3. I will ask several comprehension questions.
4. Students will be instructed on how to describe characters and the two types of characters.
5. I will use examples of a student volunteer and a minor characters and describe them.
6. I will write all the descriptive words on the board and then organize them into a diamante poem.
7. Students will be given a diamond shaped piece of color paper to write their poem. They will describe a main character, either Little Red Riding Hood or the Wolf.
8. I will go around the room and help as needed.
9. After we are done, I will have another short discussion and student volunteers to share their work.

Materials required:
• Ziefert, Harriet. “Little Red Riding Hood.” Penguin Group: New York, NY 2000.
• Colored paper cut into medium diamond shapes.
• Pencil.

Grouping for instruction:
Whole Group.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will use modeling as I pick a volunteer student to describe. I will then do the same to describe minor characters in the story. As this is done I will write a diamante poem on the board.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Independent reading: 10 minutes
Discussion: 10 minutes
Main character poems: 10 minutes.
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
For struggling readers I will monitor reading closely and help when stuck.

Evaluation:
I will grade the main character poems on the 1-4 benchmark scale.

Closure:
So today we learned about what two kinds of characters? What is the difference in main and minor characters? What kind of poem did we write? If we read a Little Red Riding Hood poem and then a wolf poem what should they sound like? Opposite? The same? Turn these in so I can add them to your portfolio.

Day 4: Lesson 2
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Social Studies: Germany Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
The story we read earlier is from Germany. We are going to locate Germany on the globe. In the U.S. we have had many immigrants from Germany. They not only brought themselves but many stories and other things to our country.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT recognize the contributions that German-Americans have made to the U.S.
SWBAT recognize literature contributions from Germany.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
TCC.2.5. Use a variety of processes, such as thinking, reading, writing, listening, and speaking, to demonstrate continuity and change.
PPE.1.2. Compare and contrast similarities and differences cultures through a variety of experiences, such as reading, writing, drawing, role-playing, dance, music, and simulation.
PPE.1.3. Analyze the contributions of various groups to community, state, and nation.
PPE.2.4. Understand the various types of maps and their uses.
A.2.9. Collaborate to create through a variety of methods (small and whole groups, interdisciplinary, etc.

Procedures:
1. Introduce the story of Little Red Riding Hood as originating from Germany.
2. I will locate Germany on a map/globe to show the students its location.
3. We will discuss how the story and other stories have been shared with us from Germany.
4. We will discuss that Beethoven was from Germany and listen to one of his compositions.
5. I will introduce that Albert Einstein was an American born German who came up with the theory of gravity.
6. I will demonstrate gravity by dropping a pencil on the floor.
7. Students will be put in pairs to draw a picture of the contributions from Germany and label each contribution.

Materials required:
• Map/globe
• CD: Beethoven selection
• Picture of Einstein
• Any object to demonstrate gravity

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group for instruction. Students will be put in pairs for drawing.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will be using technology to bring the lesson to life. By using music I will reach auditory learners and spark interest in the subject.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 15 minutes
Drawing: 10 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students with auditory difficulties could be sat next to the CD player to feel the vibrations.

Evaluation:
I will assess the drawing based on the 1-4 benchmark scale. Three contributions must be drawn and labeled.

Closure:
Does anyone want to share their pictures? I personally love classical music and it would be a shame if Beethoven’s work was not known by Americans. Did you like that kind of music? When we study science in school we count on having contributions from scientist like Einstein, what would Americans know if scientist from around the world didn’t share their ideas and discoveries? Is there any questions?


Day 4: Lesson 3
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Discovering Wolves Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
What do you know about the Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs?
Can a wolf really do those things? So that makes them make-believe. Today we are going to learn about real wolves.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT participate in a class discussion.
SWBAT tell differences between make-believe wolves and real wolves.
SWBAT name the four needs of animals; food, water, air, shelter.
SWBAT name how wolves meet their four needs.
SWBAT explain the life cycle of wolves.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
LS.2.5. Explore the life cycles of organisms.
LS.2.7. Understand that offspring are similar to their parents.
LS.2.10. Understand that organisms are interdependent.

Procedures:
1. We will first see the difference between make-believe and real wolves.
2. We will create a class KWL chart.
3. I will introduce wolf facts such as the four needs of all animals and how wolves meet them.
4. Wolves are also very social and hunt in packs to kill larger animals.
5. I will then have the internet ready and have them listen to wolves howling.
6. We will then look at pictures of wolves on the same website.
7. We will talk about how the wolf pups start howling at the end.
8. We will go back to our KWL chart and fill in what we have learned. I will take student volunteers to provide the new knowledge.
9. I will then tell the students they have an option to draw a picture of a wolf and of what kind of food it can hunt by itself and what kind of food it can hunt in a pack. Types of food will be labeled as a wolf hunt or pack hunt. Or they can use magazines to cut and paste pictures to label.

Materials required:
• White art/construction paper.
• Magazines
• Internet site: www.wolfcenter.org/Hertel/html/DLIntro.htm

Grouping for instruction:
Students will be in whole group for instruction and work independently on their drawings/collages.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will use a KWL chart and wolf pictures for visual learners. I will use an internet site for audio of howling for auditory learners and to motivate and interest students.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Discussion: 15 minutes
Drawing: 15 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
For students who cannot or do not want to draw they can cut and paste pictures to label.

Evaluation:
Student drawn or pasted labeled pictures will be graded on the 1-4 benchmark scale.

Closure:
I will ask students what they want to learn about wolves and fill in the appropriate space in the KWL chart. We will then review the information we learned about wolves and have a question/answer session.


Day 5: Lesson 1
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Listening: Lon Po Po Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Today I am going to read a Chinese version of Little Red Riding Hood. You need to listen carefully so we can compare the two stories when we are done. Remember that we listen with our ears, eyes, hands, and bodies. I know that you all can be good listeners.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT exhibit good listening skills as the story is read.
SWBAT create a venn diagram using the two versions of Little Red Riding Hood.
SWBAT work cooperatively in pairs.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
OV.2.2.4 Listen to literature and respond appropriately, including comparing/ contrasting and extending the text.
R.9.2.1 Activate prior knowledge by using features of text and/or knowledge of the author
TCC.1.3 Demonstrate the ability to think in terms of sequencing events.
A.6.2.1 Use a chart or table to organize information and to understand relationships

Procedures:
1. The teacher will read “Lon Po Po” out loud to class and show all pictures.
2. Teacher will guide discussion on similarities between the two stories.
3. Teacher will introduce a venn diagram as an easy way to see the differences and similarities or likenesses between two subjects.
4. A venn diagram will be drawn on the board like the one to be handed out to students.
5. I will ask students to explain something that is common to both students. For example, they are both students in this classroom, or they are both 7 years old. The comment will be written in the interlocking part.
6. Next, write the name of each student over his or her part of the Venn Diagram.
7. Now, ask students to respond with one thing that is special to each person. For example, he is a boy and she’s a girl or she goes to daycare and he walks home. Write those comments in the appropriate space. I will ask for more responses.
8. I will then explain that we are going to make a venn diagram for Lon Po Po and Little Red Riding Hood.
9. I will give some examples on the board and then pair students up to come up with three more examples for each section of the venn diagram.
10. As I fill out the venn diagram the students will fill out theirs.
11. After some examples and modeling students will complete their diagrams with partners.
12. As students finish, we will go over all of the similarities and differences between the two stories.
13. I will show the location of China on a globe. I will then show how far away the U.S. is.
14. We will discuss how two places so far away have stories that are so closely the same.
15. I will explain that in China being able to outsmart the wolf is looked at as a value. We will discuss why in America a man saved Little Red Riding Hood.

Materials required:
• Young, Ed. “Lon Po Po” Philomel Books; New York, NY 1989.
• Teacher made venn diagram (See appendix)

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group instruction, discussion. Partners will complete the venn diagram together.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
Modeling fluent reading and modeling examples of using the venn diagram.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Reading: 10 minutes
Discussion: 10 minutes
Venn Diagram: 10 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Struggling students will be paired with an advanced student for guidance during the group assignment.

Evaluation:
Students’ venn diagrams will be graded on the 1-4 benchmark scale. Students should have three similarities and three differences besides the teacher modeled examples.

Closure:
Was it easier for you to see the differences and similarities when we talked about it or made the venn diagram? What did you think about the Chinese version of Little Red Riding Hood? Later in science we are going to learn more about wolves as we did yesterday after “Little Red Riding Hood.”

Day 5: Lesson 2
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Social Studies: China Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Do you remember what we learned about Germany yesterday? (Take comments.) Today we are going to study China because “Lon Po Po,” which is very similar to “Little Red Riding Hood” came from China. How do you think that two stories so alike came from places so far away? Let’s look at how far away China is from Germany.

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT locate China on a map/globe.
SWBAT name several contributions China has made to our lives.
SWBAT recognize the importance of China’s contributions.
SWBAT re-create a Chinese type of artwork called scrolls.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
TCC.1.2. Explain how individuals, events, and ideas influence the history of one’s self, family, community, state, and nation.
PPE.1.2. Compare and contrast similarities and differences cultures through a variety of experiences, such as reading, writing, drawing, role-playing, dance, music, and simulation.
PPE.2.4. Understand the various types of maps and their uses.
A.2.9. Collaborate to create through a variety of methods (small and whole groups, interdisciplinary, etc.
OV.2.2.3 Follow oral directions with three or four steps

Procedures:
1. I will show students where Germany and China are on a map and a globe.
2. We will review our comparison and contrasting of how the two stories are similar and how they came from two totally different cultures.
3. I will introduce them to pictures of the Great Wall that was built over 2500 years ago to keep out intruders. This is the only man made object that can be seen from space.
4. I will show them pictures of porcelain dolls. I will then tell them that the Chinese perfected the art of making porcelain.
5. Students will be told that Ts’ai Lun invented paper from cellulose and plant fibers.
6. I will explain that a lot of the Chinese artwork was done on scrolls. We will view some examples.
7. I will introduce the information on scrolls (in appendix) and direct students on making their own (a more simple version).
8. After the scroll making we will hang them up to dry and review what we have learned.

Materials required:
• Pictures of the Great Wall.
• Pictures of porcelain dolls.
• Pictures of Chinese artwork.
• Teacher pre-make: glue sticks to long skinny sheets of paper for ‘scrolls’.
• Ribbon/string
• Fine line markers
• Watercolors
• Brushes
• Pencils
• Newspaper

Grouping for instruction:
Students will be in whole group for instruction and we will work on the scrolls as a class.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
I will be using technology and art to touch on the different types of intelligences.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 10 minutes
Scroll making: 20 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Students with mobility difficulties can pair with another student to make a scroll together.

Evaluation:
Scrolls will be assessed on the 1-4 benchmark scale. Full credit will be given if students followed directions correctly to make a scroll. Quality of artwork is not being judged.

Closure:
As we wrap up our scroll making what other contributions has China made to us? They have given us stories, art, the Great Wall, porcelain, and paper. What would you do without paper? What would we probably use in school? So since China can share these things with us our life is easier and better. Did you like making your scrolls? What kind of stories did you draw/write?


Day 5: Lesson 3
Form II: Department of Early Childhood and Special Education
P-4 Program Lesson Plan Format

Name: Jacqueline Rheann Carter Course: Curriculum Date: Fall 2005
Assignment: Endangered Wolves Grade Level: Second

Set/Introduction:
Remember yesterday we learned about wolves, well today we are going to

Learning Objectives:
SWBAT name endangered and extinct animals.
SWBAT understand the magnitude of animals becoming extinct.
SWBAT navigate the internet with assistance.
SWBAT follow instructions in the computer lab.

Concepts/Skills to be taught:
LS.2.6. Name some common animals that no longer exist (e.g., dinosaurs and mammoths).
LS.3.3. Identify that humans change environments in ways that can be beneficial or detrimental for themselves and other organisms.
SSPS.2.3. Utilize interactive technologies.
OV.2.2.3 Follow oral directions with three or four steps.

Procedures:
1. I will explain the wolf is considered an endangered species in the U.S., except in Minnesota, where it is listed as threatened, and in Alaska, where it is not listed at all.
2. We will locate these areas on a map.
3. We will discuss why negative attitudes toward wolves might be a reason why wolves are endangered.
4. We will discuss what it means to be listed as endangered.
5. We will discuss what it means to be extinct.
6. I will name and show pictures of some extinct animals like the Wooly Mammoth and dinosaur.
7. I will name and show pictures of some animals that are endangered like wolves, elephants, and the Bald Eagle.
8. We will discuss the following organizations set up to save wolves: The International Wolf Center, Wolf Park , and The Wolf Fund.
9. We will visit the computer lab and each student will be responsible for visiting one site and printing off something they are interested in.

Materials required:
• Pictures of endangered and extinct animals.
• Map of the U.S.
• Computers, online access
• http://www.42explore.com/wolves.htm (have computer teacher have page opened, lots of links for kids to click)

Grouping for instruction:
Whole group.

Teaching methods/Strategies:
Pictures are used to stimulate visual learners. Technology is used to have students make discoveries on their own.

Activities Planned:
Introduction: 5 minutes
Instruction: 10 minutes
Online: 20 minutes
Closure: 5 minutes

Special Consideration:
Organize with computer teacher before-hand, let him/her know what you need. Students that are lacking in computer navigation due to lack of access will be helped by the computer lab teacher or me.

Evaluation:
Students will be given a participation grade if they are able to print some information from the selected websites.

Closure:
I will review the terms of endangered and extinct and which one applies to wolves. I will take volunteers to share how they felt about looking at the websites. We will talk about the class contributions. I will explain that the information they collected will be used in our class discovery of wolves. I will use the students printed material to teach during science the following week.