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Grade: Elementary

#3753. Fantasy, Fables, Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales

Reading/Writing, level: Elementary
Posted Thu Apr 27 10:01:18 PDT 2006 by Alicia ().
Lake View Elementary, Huntington Beach
Materials Required: Fantasy, Fables, Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales Chart; Overhead Proj.; Const. Paper, Writing Paper
Activity Time: 1-2 Weeks
Concepts Taught: Fantasies, Fables, Muths, Legends & Fairy Tales

Lesson Plan
Fantasy, Fables, Myths, Legends and Fairy Tales

1. CA Content Standards For the Teaching Profession:
3.2 Organizing curriculum to support student understanding of subject matter.
3.4 Developing student understanding through instructional strategies that are
appropriate to the subject matter.

2. Fourth Grade Content Standards:
3.1 Describe the structural differences of various imaginative forms of literature,
including fantasies, fables, myths, legends, and fairy tales.
2.1 Write narratives:
a. Relate ideas, observations, or recollections of an event or experience.
b. Provide a context to enable the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.
c. Use concrete sensory details.
d. Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.

3. Standards of Behavior:
Students will be expected to listen attentively and follow the guidelines of the
teacher.
Students will be expected to work cooperatively with others on groups.

4. Materials:
• Fantasy, Fables, Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales Chart
• Overhead Projector
• Construction Paper
• Lined Writing Paper
• Many Different Books Illustrating Fantasies, Fables, Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales

5. Anticipatory Set:
Discuss with students the different genres that will be addressed: fantasies,
fables, myths, legends and fairy tales. Ask students to volunteer and describe
and give examples of some of the different genres. Ask the question, “Do you
know what makes these genres different from one another?”

6. Objective:
Students will be able to identify the differences between fantasies, fables,
myths, legends and fairy tales, and create their own versions of the different
genres.
7. Instructions/Teaching:
• Discuss and fill-out the chart as a whole class. While filling the characteristics of each genre, brainstorm some stories or movies that would be classified in the particular genre being discussed.
• After familiarizing the students with the characteristics of each genre, read an example of each.
• Separate the class into five different groups: The Fantasy Group, The Fable Group, The Myth Group, The Legend Group and The Fairy Tale Group.
• Have each group create their own version of the assigned genre. Tell them to be sure to include all of the characteristics for their group’s particular genre.
• Have each group share in front of the class their original story. However, don’t let the groups tell what genre they had. Let the other groups guess by identifying the different characteristics.

8. Closure:
Show student the movie, __________________________________.

9. Assessment:
Give students a blank Fantasy, Fable, Myth, Legend and Fairy Tale Chart, and
have them fill-in the characteristics for each.

10. Independent Practice:
Each table will receive five books, (one book for each of the genres being
learned.) The books will be passed around the table so each student can
look at the books and identify each one as either a fantasy, fable, myth,
legend and fairy tale. Students will complete this task silently and
independently.

11. Bloom’s Taxonomy:
a. Knowledge: Give an example of a fantasy story.
b. Comprehension: How is a myth different from a legend?
c. Application: Identify an example of each: a fantasy, fable, myth, legend
and fairy tale.
d. Analysis: Describe any similarities between any two of the genres.
e. Synthesis: Create your own fantasy, fable, myth, legend or fairy tale.
f. Evaluation: Compare your answers to the different types of stories
passed around your table, with the people at your table.

12. SDAIE:
a. Modeling: The teacher will demonstrate how to fill-in the chart on the
overhead projector.
b. Bridging: Connect the students’ understanding of the different genres to
familiar stories or movies.
c. Schema-Building: Students will compare and contrast the different genres.
d. Meta-Cognitive Development: Students will work independently and
identify different fantasies, fables, myths,
legends or fairy tales
e. Contextualization: Students will work in a group to create their own,
original fantasy, fable, myth, legend or fairy tale.
f. Text Re-Presentations: Students will fill-out their own chart with all of the
different characteristics for each of the genres.

13. Models of Teaching Used:
a. Behavioral Family: Students will identify and fill in the different
characteristics of fantasies, fables, myths, legends
and fairy tales in their charts.
b. Social Interaction Family: Students will work in groups to create their
own, original fantasies, fables, myths, legends
or fairy tales.
c. Information Processing Family: Students will identify examples of
fantasies, fables, myths, legends and
fairy tales.