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Grade: Elementary

#3764. Our American Heritage Unit Plan

Social Studies, level: Elementary
Posted Wed May 24 18:30:18 PDT 2006 by Meghan Webb (megs_118@yahoo.com).
Marshall University, Huntington, WV
Activity Time: 1-2 weeks unit
Concepts Taught: Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People

Our American Heritage
A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People

Grade Level 3

Rationale for Unit:
After completing this unit, students will be able to view how America’s past affects America’s future. Students need to know the concepts listed above because America’s patriotic symbols, holidays, celebrations, and famous people are important to our countries heritage. This lesson plan will assist the students in learning all five of the Powerful Social Studies Aims because the content will be meaningful, integrative, value based, challenging, and active. The students will be actively involved in learning and performing critical thinking, creativity, math, history, art, teamwork, and understanding how citizenship affects their lives.

Unit Objectives: Knowledge, Skill and Attitude/Value Objectives
Students will be able to:
 Explain how our past American heritage affects present America and how these concepts are meaningful to their lives today.
 Integrate this lesson in learning to incorporate the effective use of patriotic symbols, holidays, celebrations, and famous people in America.
 Work effectively as a team to meet the Value-based goals of researching and problem solving from the activities that are included in this thematic unit.

This activity also continues to meet the five powerful social studies aims because it is challenging and actively involves the students in investigating America’s past and how it affects our citizenship today.
Unit Overview:
I feel that America has been the champion for freedom and human rights because it was founded on democracy. America’s greatest strength is having all citizens, from all walks of life and cultures become informed on the issues that face our nation. Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People is a unit that teaches students the importance of our American past. These concepts are important for children to know as United States citizens because it challenges the children to critically think about the America that they are familiar with.
Unit Introduction:
Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People is an integrative unit which teaches the West Virginia Citizenship Objective S.S. 3.1.3. This objective states that students will be able to explain the significance of patriotic symbols, holidays, celebrations, and famous people.

Content Outline:
a. In this unit, the students can or may learn about various patriotic symbols such as: The Liberty Bell, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, The White House, The Statue of Liberty, The Lincoln Memorial, Yankee Doodle, The American Eagle, The United States Flag, The Star Spangled Banner, The Pledge of Allegiance, and Mount Rushmore.
b. In this unit, the students can or may learn about various American holidays such as: Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Veterans Day, President’s Day, Flag Day, and Election Day.
c. In this unit, the students can or may learn about various American celebrations such as: The Fourth of July, Christmas, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Halloween, Valentine’s Day, Thanksgiving, Easter, and New Year’s Day.
d. In this unit, the students can or may learn about various famous people such as: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Betsy Ross, Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, John Hancock, and Paul Revere.

Unit Summative Assessments
The unit summative assessments that I will use when teaching may include the following:

1. Informal Observation: The informal observations that I will use during this unit will be watching the participation, effort, and listening to the discussions of the students. Because it is difficult to grade student participation, as long as all of the students make an attempt to do their best, then they will receive five extra bonus points which will be added onto their final exam. The criteria is as follows: present during all days of this unit (unless excused absence), eager to join in discussions, and have turned in all academic work on time.
2. Short Writing Activities: The short writing activities used in this unit will be open-ended because their will be no right or wrong answers to the prompts that the children will be given to write about.
3. Cumulative Test: The cumulative test will be given at the end of the unit. Because I do not want the students to stress about this test, it will be completed as a group.
4. Research Assessment: The majority of the students’ grades from this lesson will come from their research presentation. Each day I will give the students some time to work on their project. In order to prevent assignment procrastination, each night, the students will be given one activity on their presentation that they will have to complete for homework. At the beginning of this unit, I will also inform the parents of this class project in a newsletter and invite them to participate in their child’s project. At the end of this unit, all of the parents will be invited to visit the classroom to learn about the research projects that the class has completed.

Bibliography of Teacher and Student Resources:
Ideas and information provided by the following:

http://www.sustainourfuture.org/Patriotism/
http://www.whitehouse.gov/kids/
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/symbols/
http://www.abcteach.com/USA/unit/statliberty.htm
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/whitehouse/whhome.html
http://www.brownielocks.com/patrioticsymbols.html
http://www.abcteach.com/flags/usa.htm
http://www.abcteach.com/Activities/eagle.htm
http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/symbols.htm
http://www.abcteach.com/USA/unit/stlibertycolor.htm
http://www.abcteach.com/USA/unit/flagpoem.htm


Daily Lesson Plans:
The Daily Lesson plans are included in the remainder of this assignment. There are at least three activities for each day of this unit.

Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.



Day 1
Patriotic Symbols
Read Aloud
Introduction to Research Project

Title: Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3

Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them about the country in which we live. This lesson will be focused on introducing the students to the unit and allowing them to participate in discussions about Patriotic American Symbols such as:

The Liberty Bell, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, The White House, The Statue of Liberty, The Lincoln Memorial, Yankee Doodle, The American Eagle, The United States Flag, The Star Spangled Banner, The Pledge of Allegiance, and Mount Rushmore.

This lesson will also be a briefly introduce to the students their expectations of the unit. This discussion will be mainly concentrated the independent research assignment which will be worked on both in and out of class.

Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Make connections to America in which we live by learning to define a symbols in our everyday lives and symbols of our American culture.
• Participate in classroom discussion and choose the topic for their research assignment.

Procedure:

1.) This unit will be introduced by a showing the students both symbols that we see in our everyday lives, and symbols of American culture. After presenting symbols to students I will ask them to give me the definition of a symbol and describe how they relate to their lives. Once I feel that the students understand this concept, and then they will be given the task, with my assistance to categorize the following symbols. Some symbols might include, but are not limited to:

Everyday Symbols
Handicapped Signs, Stop Signs, Music Symbols, Gender Symbols, Mathematical Symbols, Dispositional Symbols: Crying, Smiling, Laughing, Frowning, Etc., Grammatical Symbols, Prohibited Symbols, and Cultural Symbols.


Patriotic Symbols
The Liberty Bell, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, The White House, The Statue of Liberty, The Lincoln Memorial, Yankee Doodle, The American Eagle, The United States Flag, The Star Spangled Banner, The Pledge of Allegiance, and Mount Rushmore.
2.) Once the teacher feel that all of the students understand what a symbol is and how symbols relate to our lives everyday, he or she may then explain to the students the purpose of this unit.

Our country has been the champion for freedom and human rights because America was founded on democracy. What gives America the greatest strength is having all our citizens, from all walks of life and cultures become informed on the issues that face our nation.

3.) After the classroom discussion about symbols, the teacher should then read the book titled:
O, Say Can You See?: America's Symbols, Landmarks, and Inspiring Words
By: Sheila Keenan, Ann Boyajian

4.) After reading this book to the children, the teacher should then ask the student’s comprehension questions and feedback about the book. The teacher should encourage student participation.

5.) Once the teacher feels that the class has discussed the book enough, and then he or she can explain to the students about the research project that they will be completing. If possible, it would be good to give an example work expected from the students as provided by previous pictures of student’s work, an example of a presentation, research topics, etc. Note: Please make sure that the student’s do not feel overwhelmed by this assignment. The children will be given assistance and more than enough time to complete it.

6.) To conclude this lesson, the teacher may pass out the newsletter that will be addressed to both the parents and the student. This newsletter will include the research topics available and the basic rubric for this assignment.


Homework:
The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:
• Parent signature of research topics as provided by the classroom newsletter.
• That the students bring with them to school the next day at least two sources of information on the topic of his or her research project. This could include, but are not limited to: books, internet sites, internet articles, pictures, interesting facts, etc.


Evaluation:
The evaluation on today’s lesson will be based upon student participation and student understanding of what a symbol represents. After completing this lesson, the student will have learned what a symbol stands for and the symbols that represent our American heritage. In addition to this, the success of today’s lesson will also be based on the research homework that the students will complete to bring to class with them the following day.

Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.


Day 2
Patriotic Symbols: The American Flag
Patriotism Poem
Research

Title: Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3

Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them about the country in which we live. In this lesson, the students will engage in discussions and conversations about symbols and the Pledge of Allegiance. I also think that it is important for the students to understand why we say the pledge and how it affects their lives.

Objectives:
Students will be able to:

• Generate the importance of patriotic symbols
• Participate and recognize why we say the Pledge of Allegiance

Procedure:

Before beginning this lesson, I think that it is important for the teacher to remember that certain religions do not believe in allegiance to the United States Flag. Please make sure to accommodate this lesson to avoid discrimination to any child because this activity is strictly informative, not condescending.

1.) The teacher can begin this lesson by recapping on the information discussed the previous day: everyday symbols and patriotic symbols. Explain to the students that today we will be learning about the American Flag and why we say the Pledge of Allegiance.
2.) The teacher may then ask the students why they think that we start off the school day saying the Pledge of Allegiance every morning. Why do they think that it is important? Does it offend you to say the Pledge of Allegiance?
3.) Once the students have had a chance to contribute their opinions to the discussion, the teacher may then to further go on to explain why we say the pledge and why it is important to American culture. He or she may also go onto explain why certain groups in American find the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag offensive.
4.) After the teacher feels that everyone understand why the American Flag is important to American culture, he or she may pass out the Pledge to the Flag Poem Sheet. Emphasize to the students that this is their own work, so be creative with your poem because there are not right or wrong answers!
5.) Once the students have completed their poem, they will be given free time to research their chosen topic to prepare for the presentation at the end of the unit. There should be books as well as helpful internet sites available for the students. Note: Teacher should be constantly walking around the room monitoring students while they are researching for assistance if needed.

Homework:
The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:

• Collect five interesting facts about your patriotic symbol or person to bring to class with you the next day. This information can be found in books, magazines, or the internet.
• Finish Coloring their American Flag.

Evaluation:
The evaluation for the success of this lesson will be the student’s poem as well the informally observing the student’s while they research materials that they need for their presentation. In addition to this, the lesson can also be evaluated by the engagement of student discussion in the topic of America’s Flag and the Pledge of Allegiance.

Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.




The Pledge of Allegiance
I Pledge Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands,
one Nation under God,
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all
The U.S. flag has undergone many changes since the first official flag of 1777. On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed the first Flag Act, which said that the flag would be made up of thirteen alternating red and white stripes and thirteen white stars on a blue field. Stars have been added to the flag as new states join the union. Currently, the flag contains 50 stars.
Ever wonder why the flag is red, white, and blue? While the flag's colors did not have a specific meaning at the time, the colors were significant for the Great Seal of 1782.
• White: Signifies purity and innocence
• Red: Signifies valor and bravery
• Blue: Signifies Vigilance, perseverance, and justice
Why stars and stripes? Stars are considered a symbol of the heavens and the divine goal to which man has aspired from time immemorial; the stripe is symbolic of the rays of light emanating from the sun.
The Pledge of Allegiance was first published in 1892 in The Youth's Companion magazine in Boston, Massachusetts to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America. It was first used in public schools to celebrate Columbus Day on October 12, 1892. The Pledge received official recognition by Congress as an Act approved on June 22, 1942. The phrase "under God" was added to the Pledge by a Congressional act approved on June 14, 1954.
A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the Pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth's Companion, and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939, a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favor of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee's ruling.
The United States Code (4USC4) states that when delivering the Pledge of Allegiance, all must be standing at attention, facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. It also states that men not in uniform should remove any nonreligious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute.
Cited: Ben’s Guide: U.S. Government for Kids
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/symbols/pledgeallegiance.html

Day 3
American Holidays and Celebrations: Scavenger Hunt
Research

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them about the country in which we live. This lesson is meaningful to the students because there are many holidays that are celebrated in the United States of America.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Recognize the significance of various American Holidays and Celebrations such as Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, Christmas, Veterans Day, Hanukkah, President’s Day, Election Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Halloween, Valentine’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, and New Year’s Day
• Recognize why American’s celebrate holidays
Procedures:
To teach this lesson the teacher will arrange a scavenger hunt for the students.
1.) The teacher should arrange students in groups (ranging from four to five students) for a classroom scavenger hunt.
2.) The key of this activity is for the students to find the clues of American Holidays. Each piece that they find will list a specific holiday that we celebrate in America. As a group, the team members have to find the specific artifact that describes the holiday. For example, if a group is searching for the Easter Holiday then they will be searching for the artifact of an Easter egg.
3.) The first group to find all of the artifacts wins the scavenger hunt. However, sometimes winning isn’t always what you want it to be. Because they won the scavenger hunt they will have to wear goofy looking hats that represent American holidays for the entire class day. For example: Christmas will be represented by a Santa Hat, Easter will represented by bunny ears, President’s Day will be represented by an Abraham Lincoln top hat, etc. All groups that complete the scavenger hunt will receive a prize.
4.) The teacher may then decide to further explain the significance of holidays in America and answer any questions that the children may have about them.
5.) Once, the teacher feel that the students understand the concept of American holidays then he or she should then give them the short writing prompt for an additional prize.

Writing Prompt:
What is you favorite holiday? Why is it your favorite holiday? How do you celebrate this holiday? Draw a picture of your favorite holiday.
6.) Once the students have completed their writing assignment, they may then research material needed for their presentation.
Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:
• Independent Research: Tomorrow bring in a picture or pictures of you patriotic symbol or person.
Evaluation:
The evaluation of their lesson will include student participation in the scavenger hunt as well as the free writing. Through these activities, the teacher will be able to view cooperative problem solving skills as well as creative composition.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.

American Holidays and Celebrations
What is you favorite holiday? Why is it your favorite holiday? How do you celebrate this holiday? Draw a picture of your favorite holiday.
Name: ___________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




Day 4
School House Rock Educational Film
Read Aloud
Craft Stick Flag
Research

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them about the country in which we live. This lesson is meaningful to the students because there are many concepts that will be covered in the movie that will reinforce the student’s understanding of this unit.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Recognize the significance of the material covered in this educational video and relate it to in class discussions.
• Create craft stick flags from Popsicle sticks.
• Actively participate in researching material for their presentation.
Procedures:
Before beginning this lesson, the teacher may want to create a KWL chart.
1.) To begin this lesson, the teacher should explain to the children that they will be watching a short educational film titled Schoolhouse Rock! (Special 30th Anniversary Edition) (1973) .The teacher should then prompt the students to decide what they want to learn from both the video and the unit. If possible, have the students come up to the front of the class to contribute their ideas on the graphic organizer. Explain to the children, that they will complete a worksheet on the material after the video.
2.) Once the class has finished watching the video, the teacher may then prompt a discussion with the students to finish the KWL chart.
3.) After completing the KWL chart, the teacher may then go on to read Stars and Stripes: The Story of the American Flag Sarah L. Thomson while the students are completing their craft stick flags.


Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:
• Independent Research: Bring in a rough draft copy of your presentation for the teacher to edit.
Evaluation:
The evaluation of their lesson will include student engagement in the educational film, KWL chart, the read aloud, and the craft stick flag work. The teacher will also be able to informally assess this lesson by the student discussions in the class.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.

Day 5
Quiz Bowl Game
Research

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it allows them to recap on the material that we have covered in the class. This lesson is meaningful to the students because there are many concepts that will be covered that will reinforce the student’s understanding of this unit.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Participate in the student Quiz Bowl game which will reinforce the concepts that they have learned in this unit
• Actively participate in researching material for their presentation
Procedures:
Note: Most of the information that will be covered during the quiz bowl game should help the student’s review most of the material that will be at the end of their unit test.
1.) Before beginning the quiz bowl game, the teacher should review the unit material that the class has covered over the past five days. I personally, would not tell the students why we are reviewing the material; just tell them to pay special attention to the questions that are being asked and the material that is being covered.
2.) Once the teacher feels that he or she has accurately reviewed all or most of the unit’s material, then he or she may then divide the class up into two different groups which will pose as two different quiz bowl teams.
3.) Tell the student’s that you are going to give them five minutes to come up with a cool name that relates to the unit’s material. For example, one group may come up with a name such as “Washington’s Wizard’s”.
4.) One the student’s have chosen a name for their group, have them pick one person who will say the answers for that group. Remind the students that if any student blatantly calls out an answer with out being called on, then the opposing team will automatically win that point regardless if their answer is correct. Also, it would be important to remind the students that they should discuss their answers quietly as a team because you wouldn’t want the other team to hear your answers.
5.) Once the teacher feels that the student’s are ready, then he or she may start the game. May the best team win!
6.) If there is any time left at the end of the game, the teacher may want to allow his or her students to work on their oral presentations.
Optional: The teacher may choose to reward the team with the most points at the end of the game.

Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:

• At the end of the day the student’s will be given a timeline or a fact worksheet that will assist them in their oral presentations. For homework, they will complete this assignment and turn it in to the teacher the next day.
Evaluation:
To evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson, the teacher can monitor the progress of the quiz bowl game. After playing this competitive game, the teacher will be able to see the concepts covered in this unit that the students do not understand.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.

Day 6
Famous American People: A Focus on George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Betsy Ross, Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, John Hancock, and Paul Revere


Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them about prominent people important to the history of the United States. This lesson is meaningful to the students because there are many concepts that will be covered that will reinforce the student’s understanding of this unit.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Recognize the significance of prominent American people and relate it to class material.
• Recognize the concept of time periods.
Procedures:
1.) To start off this lesson, the teacher should show pictures of the prominent individuals listed above on a slide show. When showing the students the pictures, ask the students some of the questions listed below.
• Who is this person?
• Why do you think they are important?
• How old do you think that they are?
• When do you think that they were born?
• When do you think that they died?
• What do you think that they did?
• What events were taking place in their lives?
• How is this person’s life different from our lives?


2.) Once the teacher feels that the children have discussed enough of the questions, then he or she may then reveal some of the answers to that specific person on the next slide.
3.) Once the teacher has finished the slide show, then the entire class will help to fill out a timeline that focuses on the individuals in this lesson. I feel that this activity will teach the student’s a concept of time. As the teacher, I also think that it is important to relate this activity to the lives of children, so make sure that you include various events that are important to them. I feel that this will give them a better grasp to understand time periods. For example, you could add in individual birthdays, inventions. If possible, it would also be helpful to add pictures that visualize the time period that is being discussed.
4.) Once the student’ have finished this assignment, have them complete a free write which will be turned in for a grade at the end of the class period.
Topic: If you could be one famous person in American History who would you be? Why would you be them?


Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:

• For homework, the student’s have their parent’s sign the classroom newsletter which is a formal invitation to visit the school and participate in our oral presentation day.

Evaluation:
To evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson, the teacher can monitor the progress of the student’s as they participate in the group discussion over the slide show and the classroom timeline. The teacher will also be able to evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson by grading the writing assignment.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.

Day 7
Jobs and Responsibilities of the United States President
Read Aloud
Compose a Letter to the President of the United States of America

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it teaches them the responsibilities of the president of the United States of America.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Identify the jobs and responsibilities of the president of the United States of America
• Compose a letter the current president of the United States of America
• Actively listen and participate in the book presented in the read aloud

Procedures:
1.) To begin this lesson, explain to the students that at the end of the day they will be writing their own letter to the current president of the United States of America. Tell them that they need to pay special attention to the material discussed in today’s class so that they can write him or her best letter possible. Be sure to let the students know that after their letter has been proofread, then they will actually being sending the letter off in the mail to go to Washington.
2.) Once the teacher has the students’ full attention, he or she may then go on to read the book So You Want to Be President? By: Judith St. George and David Small. Periodically while reading this book; it will be important for the teacher to discuss the responsibilities and jobs of the president of the United States. Ask the student’s to relate this job to their lives.
• What would they do if they were the president?
• Would they try to be a good president?
• What would be the first thing that they would do when the moved into the White House?
• Would you eat your vegetables if you were the president of the United States of America?
• Would you have any pets?
• Would you be married?
• How many children would you have?
• What would you do for America if you the president of the United States of America?

3.) Once the teacher has finished the book, and feels that the students understand the responsibilities and jobs of the president, then he or she may then show them an example of a letter that could be written to the president. It will be important to direct the students to use a proper writing format and encourage them to use the best writing possible after they have completed their “sloppy copy”.
4.) After the teacher has edited the student’s letters and they are free of grammatical errors, then he or she may then ask for student volunteers to read their letters to the class.
5.) Once the student’s have read their letters, then the teacher should explain to the student’s how they are to address their envelope to the president of the United States of America. Once the teacher feels that all of the students understand this concept then he or she may then pass out an individual envelopes and pens to the students.
6.) Together as a class, the student’s will seal their envelopes and give them to the teacher who will mail them off later that day in a manila envelope.


Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:

• Ask the student’s to bring their completed oral presentations to finish working on tomorrow during class.
• Ask the student’s to be prepared to take the summative unit exam the following day.

Evaluation:
To evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson, the teacher can monitor the progress of the student’s as they participate in the read aloud by the questions that are being asked and the discussions that were generated. The teacher will also be able to evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson by grading the writing assignment which will be addressed to the president of the United States of America.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.

Day 8
Unit Exam
Research Day/Catch-Up Day
Prepare Class for Oral Presentations and Parent/Faculty Visitations

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it allows them to finish their oral presentations which will be given the next day. I feel that lesson will be helpful to the student’s because it will give them the opportunity to finish their research, put the final touches on their presentations, and the practice their speeches.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Successfully complete the summative unit exam
• Participate in completing their oral presentation which will be given the next class day
Procedures:
1.) After briefly reviewing the test material, the teacher should give each student a unit exam to complete.
2.) After each student has received a test then he or she should explain to the students that after they have finished their test then they will be given free time to work on their presentations which will be given the following day.
3.) Once the student’s presentations have been checked by the teacher, then the students will be aloud to either read, complete fun educational worksheets, or assist other student’s with their presentations.

Homework:

The homework for this lesson will build upon the research assignment which will be due at the end of this unit. Tonight’s homework will include:

• There will be no homework for the students if they have completed their presentation project. However, I will ask them to remind their parents to visit out classroom the following day to see what we have learned from the unit.


Evaluation:
The evaluation of this lesson will be based on the unit exam that will be given to the students. The teacher can also evaluate the effectiveness of this lesson by the student participation in completing their research assignment.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.


Day 9
End of Unit Party
Oral Presentations and Parent/Faculty Visitations

Our American Heritage: A Focus on Patriotic Symbols, Holidays, Celebrations, and Famous People
Grade Level 3
Rationale:
I feel that the students need to learn the content of this lesson because it allows them to share their oral presentations with their classmates, faculty members, and parents. I feel that this lesson will be meaningful to the students because the information that they will be receiving has come straight from their own research.
Objectives:
Students will be able to:
• Share their research assignments to their fellow classmates, other faculty members, and parents
• Participate in a classroom party that celebrates our nation’s heritage
Procedures:
1.) To begin this lesson, the students will prepare for their oral presentations. Once the parents and faculty members have arrived, we will start the presentations. After the students have presented their material, then the teacher will select another student to go.
2.) After all of the students have given their presentations, then as a class, we will celebrate the end of this unit with a party that celebrates our national heritage. During the party, other faculty members and parents and or family members will be invited to look around the room to observe all of the neat activities that we have done during this unit!

Note: As the teacher, I feel that it is important to not pressure any student to give a presentation if they don’t want to. However, I feel that the majority of the students will want to share their work with the rest of the class. If I feel that there is a student in my class that is uncomfortable with giving an oral presentation in front of their peers, other faculty members, and their family or friends I will try my best to comfort them. If needed, I will actually assist them through their oral presentations to not make any student feel too pressured.


Homework:

There will be no homework for the student’s to complete because the class has successfully completed this unit plan!

Evaluation:
The evaluation of this lesson will be based on the oral presentations that will be given by the students.
Modifications for Diverse Learners:
If there were any students in my class that needed assistance, I would pay special attention to accommodating my lesson to their educational needs, as well as my regular students’ educational needs. If required, I would work one-on-one with the student or assign the student with a “study buddy”. I feel that in using these types of services, I will be providing the best possible and least restrictive learning environment for a child with a mild to moderate disability.
Also, if I feel that there is a student in my class that is uncomfortable with giving an oral presentation in front of their peers, other faculty members, and their family or friends I will try my best to comfort them. If needed, I will actually assist them through their oral presentations to not make any student feel too pressured.