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Grade: Middle
Subject: Science

#3781. Vertebrates: Oh My!

Science, level: Middle
Posted Sun Aug 6 15:54:58 PDT 2006 by Maria Klein (Maria.Klein@usd.edu).

Materials Required: Internet, attached worksheets
Activity Time: 40 minutes adaptable
Concepts Taught: mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds

Lesson 1
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 15, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: Computer adaptable with Microsoft PowerPoint, projector to project images onto a screen, hand-out to accompany the PowerPoint activity

Procedures:
PRE: Explain to the class that we will be moving onto vertebrates. Engage the class in a discussion as to what a vertebrate is. Ask for examples. Explain that today we will begin Amphibians
DURING: Begin by passing out the Awesome Amphibians PowerPoint presentation. Engage the students by asking questions about specific slides. Once the PowerPoint presentation is over, begin the video clips over reptiles. After the video, ask the students for ideas as to what they learned. One of the most important aspects of amphibians is their lack of the ability to lay land eggs and a metamorphosis phase (this is the major difference between amphibians and the closely related reptiles)
POST: Discuss the metamorphosis process with students. Go back to the slide if necessary. Hand out the “Label the Frog Life Cycle Diagram” work on the worksheet together with the class. Have the students hand in the worksheet at the end of class.

Rationale: The class “Vertebrates” is an important topic to go over since we as humans also belong to this group. Going over each group on an individual basis allows students to draw inferences, compare and contrast, and gain important insight as to distinguishing and unique characteristics.

Evaluation: Frog metamorphosis worksheets

View Frog Metamorphosis Worksheet

Lesson 2
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 16, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: Computer adaptable with Microsoft PowerPoint, projector to project images onto a screen, hand-out to accompany the PowerPoint activity

Procedures:
PRE: Being by reviewing amphibians and their distinguishing characteristics such as: dependence on water for reproduction, water eggs, and metamorphosis. Tell the class that today we will move on the very closely related reptiles
DURING: Begin by passing out the Really Cool Reptiles PowerPoint presentation. Engage the students by asking questions about specific slides. Once the PowerPoint presentation is over, begin the video clips over reptiles. After the video, ask the students for ideas as to what they learned. Reptiles and amphibians can be told apart by the following: reptiles lay land eggs and are less dependant on water; they do no go through metamorphosis, and are covered in scales. This knowledge is imperative for students to succeed in determining which group animals belong to. Hand out the following worksheet “What is it?” worksheet. Put up the “What is it?” transparency. Ask students to volunteer to come up and complete one row of the worksheet. Next, pass out the Reptile and Amphibian Venn Diagram activity. This should help students differentiate between reptiles and amphibians.
POST: Give students time to complete the Venn Diagram activity.

Rationale: The class “Vertebrates” is an important topic to go over since we as humans also belong to this group. Going over each group on an individual basis allows students to draw inferences, compare and contrast, and gain important insight as to distinguishing and unique characteristics.

Evaluation: Venn Diagram worksheets

View Venn Diagram Worksheet

View What is it Worksheet

Lesson 3
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 17, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: Computers adaptable Internet Explorer

Procedures:
PRE: Being by reviewing amphibians and reptiles and their distinguishing characteristics. Tell the class that today we will be working in the computer lab and using the Internet to play and amphibian and reptile game. Give the students the following website: http://www.kidscom.com/games/animal/animal.html tell them to play each game and to write 2 facts for each mystery animal.
DURING: While the students are in the computer lab, move among the groups and make sure students are on the correct site. Some students may need help with spelling some of the more difficult animals.
POST: No homework, computer lab for duration of the period.

Rationale: The class “Vertebrates” is an important topic to go over since we as humans also belong to this group. Going over each group on an individual basis allows students to draw inferences, compare and contrast, and gain important insight as to distinguishing and unique characteristics.

Evaluation: Ability to navigate through the website

Lesson 4
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 18, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: What is a mammal worksheet, Newcastle textbooks, and quizzes

Procedures:
PRE: Begin the class by handing out the reptile and amphibian quiz. Tell the students they have 10-15 minutes to complete the quiz. Tell the students specific directions that are applicable to the quiz. Instruct the students to raise their hand when they are finished and that there is to be no talking until all quizzes have been handed in.
DURING: Observe by moving about the room and answering questions. After all of the quizzes have been handed in, go over the answers and tell the students that the quizzes will be graded and handed back tomorrow. Tell the students that we are continuing with vertebrates, more specifically, mammals. Hand out the “What is a mammal?” reading activity. Play “popcorn” and have students read a passage/paragraph and popcorn the next student to read. After the "popcorn" activity, hand out the “Is it a mammal?” worksheet. Put the accompanying overhead up and ask for volunteers to fill out one row of the worksheet. Discuss certain properties of mammals as students follow along. Instruct the students to read in their book (section over mammals) for the remainder of the period.
POST: Have students hand in the “Is it a mammal?” worksheet at the end of the period.

Rationale: The class “Vertebrates” is an important topic to go over since we as humans also belong to this group. Going over each group on an individual basis allows students to draw inferences, compare and contrast, and gain important insight as to distinguishing and unique characteristics.

Evaluation: “Is it a mammal?” worksheet

View Mammal reading activity

Is it a mammals Worksheet (See What is it worksheet from lesson 2)

Lesson 5
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 22, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: Computer adaptable with Microsoft Internet Explorer, projector to project images onto a screen, hand-out to accompany the Infrared Zoo activity

Procedures:
PRE: Explain to the class that we will be doing an activity over ectotherms (cold-blooded) and endotherms (warm-blooded) This activity should make examples of animal body temperatures concrete.
DURING: Split the class into 4 groups of 4. Make sure to include IEP students with stronger and more vocal students. Pass out the hand-out, “Ectothermic and Endothermic, can you determine body temperature?” Allow the groups about 10 minutes to collaborate and determine body temperatures among different types of animals including: dogs, humans, chickens, cows, sheep, gecko, lizard, etc. Move about the 4 groups and ask students their reasoning behind their answers. If answers are totally off, prompt by asking students, “What do we know about ectotherms and how they regulate their body temperature?” “What do we know about endotherms and how they regulate their body temperature?”
After the class has had ten minutes to determine body temperatures, have one student from each group provide the answers the agreed upon for each animal. Keep tallies marks on the board for each correct answer. After each group has provided all the answers, go to the following website: http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/ show the infrared images of each animal to the students. Tell the students to note where the highest temperature occur (eyes, cheeks, etc) and where the coldest temperatures occur (extremities such as ears, paws, tails, etc.) ask the students to draw inferences as to why the coldest/warmest temperatures occur and why.
Assign each group an animal and have them answer the remaining questions on their worksheets.
POST: Have the students hand in their worksheets and allow them to spend some extra time on the site if time allows.

Rationale: The body temperature among animals is one of the major distinguishing characteristics among vertebrates. The website listed above allows students to view warm temperatures as reds, yellows, and oranges and cool temperatures as blues, blacks, and

View Infrared Zoo Worksheet

Lesson 6
Name: Miss Maria Klein Date: November 23, 2005 Time: 50 minutes

Course Title: 7th Integrated Grade Level: 7th

Instructional Objectives: 8.2.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop the abilities needed to do scientific inquiry. 8.4.1 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of the structure and function in living systems. 8.4.3 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of regulation and behavior. 8.4.5 By the end of eighth grade, students will develop an understanding of diversity and

adaptations of organisms

Materials: Bingo cards (18) pennies to cover bingo spaces and animals/characteristic definitions

Procedures:
PRE: Begin the class by handing out Bingo cards and pennies (enough to cover squares) tell the students to make sure that their card has a “free space”. Tell the students that you will only read the definition twice, if they still do not hear the definition, they will have to discuss with their neighbor “study buddy”. Also, explain that students should NOT clear their boards until I have concurred that all over the bingo squares were indeed called. If there are multiple bingos, I will call on students individually to give me their squares. Students will be rewarded a candy for a bingo
DURING: Wait for the students to quiet down before reading the definitions. Place all of the bingo words in a bowl and draw the words individually. Match the word with its definition. Make sure to read the definition twice. After a bingo has been confirmed, instruct students to clear their bingo cards. Tell the students that they may switch their cards if both students are willing. Play regular 5 square bingo as time allows.
POST: No homework

Rationale: The class “Vertebrates” is an important topic to go over since we as humans also belong to this group. Going over each group on an individual basis allows students to draw inferences, compare and contrast, and gain important insight as to distinguishing and unique characteristics.

Evaluation: Ability to match definitions and words

View Bingo Card Example