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Grade: Senior
Subject: History

#4399. The Tumultuous 60s

History, level: Senior
Posted Tue May 26 17:06:48 PDT 2009 by Joanne Sith (Joanne Sith).
University of San Diego, San Diego, USA
Materials Required: Internet access,
Activity Time: 2-3 weeks


Author: Joanne Sith Time Frame: 2 weeks/ 2 hour block schedule
Course: EDUC 535 Students: 11th Grade American History
Content: 1960s: A Tumultuous Decade Approximately 24-26 students


This unit is designed for an 11th grade US History class. Students should have background knowledge of the Conservatism 50’s to understand the chaotic nature of the 1960s. Therefore it is imperative that the students transfer their enduring understanding of the Cold War effects: the hysteria it created domestically and the battle between capitalism and communism. The previous lessons starting from the 1930s were targeting our students to recognize the parallelism of historical trends to our modern times. In this unit, the aim is to not only to parallel many of the 1960s elements to today’s but also to pull my students historical empathy to further enhance their historical understanding and critical thinking skills.

These lessons are a continuation of the larger themes of the effects of the Containment Policy post WWII. The content material of this unit will enable the students to practice their metacognition skills, as well as develop historical perspective. The themes of morality and change within society both in the past and the present will properly facilitate the more in-depth examination of the interdependent associations amongst the economic persistency of capitalism, “domino theory”, preservation and implementation of American’s democratic ideals, and philosophical changes that influence major shifts in attitude in people. This unit was designed and implemented at a school site that does not stress the necessity to follow the California State Content Standards for History-Social Science. But this unit does introduce in many ways the following state standards: 11.9.3 “Trace the origins and geopolitical consequences (foreign and domestic) of the Cold War and Containment policy, including the following: The Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban Missile Crisis, Atomic Testing in the American West, the “Mutual Assured Destruction” doctrine, the Vietnam War. Additionally, student will present and debate their assigned civil rights’ organization mission statement and agenda, which is responding Social Science Standards 11.10, particularly sub-standards that emphasize: Examine the roles of civil rights advocates (e.g Martin Luther King, Jr. Malcolm X, James Farmer) and Discuss the diffusion of the civil rights movement of African American from the churches of the rural South and the urban North and how the advances influenced the agendas, strategies, and effectiveness of the questions of these civil rights organizations.

The teacher must understand that the 1960s has a lot of content that is significantly connective to our modern day. The purpose of teaching significant elements of the 1960s supersedes the comprehensive list of the California State Standards. The teacher must understand that historical is an essential subject that provides our students with the ample amount of historical evidence they need to gain the multiple perspectives of history. The acknowledgement of these perspectives should not be the end; the educator must value the powerful learning tool of historical empathy. Building empathy in our students allows them to connect with history at a more internalized level, which amplifies history’s connectivity to modern day. The teacher must also respect that students are encouraged to exercise their Habits of Mind, which are the thought processes they should be practicing while they are looking critically at a piece of history. Allow them to find significance, perspective, evidence, connection and supposition. Furthermore, the teacher must be willing to play the balanced role of the invisible teacher (a side observer) and visible teacher (a direct instructor). The balance of these opens up more opportunities for our students to become active meaning makers, in which they can refine and construct new understandings as they are cooperatively learning from one another and from themselves. Additionally, the active educator role pushes us to know history and to teach it well, which will essentially help our student build their new knowledge. Therefore, teachers should have a good amount of knowledge concerning with this particular time period.

Students are expected to embody the basic skills that surround the Habits of Mind environment at this school. Some of the thought strategies stated above should be used regularly whenever the students are working with a piece of work. Students should also be comfortable with taking notes while the teacher lectures. The students should have a separate lecture notebook and a journal notebook that they maintain throughout this lesson. (If your students are not familiar with note-taking, perhaps using Cornell Notes will benefit students who are not used to taking notes in class). The students should also have existing computer skills that will be essential to their research time. Fortunately, due to the project-based learning concept at this school site, our students are already familiar with research tools online.

During the construction of this unit plan, I wanted the learning activities to prompt my students to act as historians do, meaning I want them to investigate the reasoning behind individuals who oppose and support societal changes and understand the sentiments of those who embrace the new social and moral values. The ability of historically thinking is scaffolded through questionnaires and investigation strategies and discussions that further support their critical thinking skills. Contextualizing the content of a topic enables students to perceive and rethink in ways that are different from the conventional ways of present day assumptions, also known as presentism. Wineburg’s perspective of historical thinking truly bridges the past and the present together for our students. Teachers need to provide opportunities to break or remold the existing beliefs that shape the information students encounter in order to build new knowledge. By challenging our students to be more open-minded, the availability for our students to appreciate the multiple perspectives of the past encourages our students to internalize these sentiments rather than simply acknowledging them. Historical empathy as stated by the National Standards of history defines empathy as “the ability to describe the past through the eyes and experiences of those who were there, as revealed through, their literature, art, artifacts, and the like, and to avoid ‘present-mindedness,’ judging the past solely in terms of the norms and values of today.” Incorporating historical empathy will further foster our students’ historical understanding since they are rationalizing the past with perhaps an appreciation of historical mind-frames.

Furthermore, by incorporating the various learning styles and needs of my students, they will not only engage in historical thinking but also participate in their own constructivist learning. By analyzing historical documents, encouraging student critical thinking and inquiry to open-ended questions, facilitating student-led discussions, involving them in cooperative learning, and providing ample time for students to construct their own meaning, the students will learn how to make sense of the new material on their own with the teacher as a scaffolding guide.

Finally, instruction throughout this learning segment will be based off of Vygotsky’s theory of Zone of Proximal Development. The classroom activities and assignments will be scaffolded in order to challenge students at their instructional level but also avoid confusion and frustration. The students, as young historians, need to rely on their habits of mind to apply new reasoning and understanding. Therefore, by understanding the significance, evidence, and perspective, the students can formulate further connections and suppositions on the topic.


The enduring understanding desired in this unit plan is to ultimately develop in my students a sense of historical empathy. With historical empathy, the students should understand that the affective connection to the past is what constructs the moralities of our modern day. Students should take away that past events in the 1960s are incredibly parallel to today. Moreover, students should use their open-mindedness to appreciate other perspectives as a means to not only enhance their historical understanding but also to support or even construct their opinion/judgments. With historical empathy, students will understand how our nation’s recent past directly influences our outlook and status in the world.

Wiggins and McTighe’s Six Facets of Understanding will be incorporated throughout this unit. The students will be instructed to explain and show the key elements of the 1960s, particularly during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War segments. Interpretation will be exercised when the students need to make subjects personal and accessible through designing a lesson plan outline of the Vietnam War that is geared for teaching students from Vietnam. They will apply what they know about the 1960s message music format and apply that knowledge as they create their own message song. They will obtain perspective as the lectures and learning activities are designed to reveal the multiple aspects history – for instance to not only understand why the US was fighting the war but the civil war aspect of the Viet Congs’. They will exercise empathy as they find value and even respect the value(s) that other historical perspectives have that students might find odd. i.e: considering the legacy of JFK and the Vietnam War. Lastly, my students will have self-knowledge as they are pushed to metacognitively think and respond in a way that hopefully entices them to think beyond what they already know.

The primary essential question that students will consider throughout this unit is: Does it really matter if we are true to our democratic ideals? Guiding questions along the way may include: What are the multiple definitions of democracy? Is democracy considered superior to other political philosophies? How far should a nation go to maintain the status quo? Will there ever be peace on earth?

Students will acquire and understanding the following terms: The legacy of JFK, LBJ, Great Society, Racing the Russians in Space and in Nuclear Arms, Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile Crisis, Apollo 13, the history of the Vietnam (causes, containment of communism, domino theory effect, Ho Chi Minh & Vietcong), rise of public dismay towards the Vietnam War (Tet Offensive, My Lai Massacre, escalation, and death toll), The Vietnam Legacy (Vietnam Veterans, Press, the people’s voice, international reputation, and role of military), Emergence of Civil Rights Movements and the play on words with the term “Democracy,” and lastly the birth of a counter-culture. The students will contextualize these historical terms and meaning as they research for themselves why the 1960s was so tumultuous and why it created such a counter- revolution never witnessed before in history. Students will acquire the meaning of some of the described terms through teacher lectures, visual documentaries, audio interpretation of 60s music & current music, analytical interpretations of war time photographs and visual depictions of our 1960s presidents.

Student learning will be measured using formative and summative assessments. To encourage our students to practice and develop their historical empathy, the first assignment will push them to demonstrate their content awareness of the legacy of JFK and to empathize with the distraught nature that his assassination bought onto the country. Therefore the first formative assignment calls for our students to write up a eulogy for JFK that addresses 4-6 characteristics of JFK that they gathered from studying the lecture and from analyzing 1960s magazines that portrayed the Kennedys. As the unit continues, scaffolding towards the final project will take place as the students analyze and interpret the social message embedded within the popular 1960s message music songs and current message songs. They will write these reflections in their journals, which will be turned in at the end of this unit. Additionally, after each new historical topic that involves “democracy,” the students will reflect in their journal (as an exit slip) these two questions, what do you think the definition of democracy is in this case? Do you believe we modeled this version of democratic accurately?

Student responses, participation in class discussions and presentation of ideas will also serve as informal assessments. (The Civil Rights group presentation and recruitment debate). The students will also monitor their own learning and their peers as the final project’s peer evaluation sheet will count towards their grade. This will motivate students to show academic accountability when working in groups.

The summative assessment will the students’ production of a message song, using 4 1960s connections to convey a modern social/political agenda. The song’s content and lyrics are graded on the basis that they answer in their own musical way the essential question. The 3 member music group must determine a current problem of society today that might contradict our democratic ideals, such as gay marriage rights, immigration restrictions, etc… Furthermore, the students need to be aware of the lasting effects that the 1960s has had on many of our modern problems; thus, attaching four 1960s elements into the song is also essential. A song cover must also be creatively designed to illustrate the content of the song and a presentation of the song will also account for the student’s grade.

The main activities that students will engage in during the unit include: whole group, partner, and eventually individual analysis of social and political songs; individual reflections of what the term democracy can mean and how democratic ideals were enacted at different historical events; table group analysis of 1960s magazines that visually portray the 1960s and JFK; group research and analysis of major civil rights organization; group collaboration and project work time to complete music project; and individual analysis of the Vietnam war and its importance.

The introduction of the legacy of JFK allows our students to understand how representative his image was to the beginning years of the 1960s. This lays the foundation of how his abrupt and brutal assassination sparked this decade into disarray. The visual imagery of the Kennedy –Nixon debates and the class discussion of what the American public of the 1960s witnessed as they watched in their living rooms allowed our students activate their historical empathy. Furthermore, after the mini-lesson on the legacy of the JFK and his successor LBJ, the students will be time in class to analyze magazines from the 1960s. The students are encouraged to examine the items advertised, the language used in these magazines, and the pictures. As they embed themselves into the world of the 1960s through flipping through these historical artifacts, they are assigned to write a Eulogy for JFK, based on the information they gathered from the lectures and the magazines.

The affective connectivity from the previous lesson will further enhance their understanding of the Vietnam Legacy. Before the Vietnam lecture begins, the students will write in their journals what they honestly already know about the war. After this brief 5-7 minute reflection, a brief class discussion will follow. The lecture should be taught with war time photographs to further illustrate the importance of this war. The visual imagery allows our students to place themselves with the reality of the war and concludes to our students the power of visual imagery during the 1960s. Finally, as an exit slip, the students will individually define the term democracy in the case of the Vietnam War and if the historical event embodied that definition. This permits our students to consider for themselves what they believe the term democracy means and how it can be used and even implemented. This self reflection will occur after each new study of the 1960s. Therefore, in this case, the civil rights movement and the larger movements of the counter-culture. The students will be encouraged to use their journal responses as a foundation to their message music.

The introduction of the final project will also be introduced. The students will be assigned their three member group and they will also get to randomly select a popular 60s song, which they have to rewrite with their own lyrics. To scaffold this process, the teacher and the class will analyze a popular message song “For what it’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield. (see attached sample of how to analyze a song with the class) After this modeled example, encourage students to analyze songs with partners and then themselves by supplying a new message song that they will have to examine and interpret throughout this unit. Near the middle of the unit, share with the students the music project rubric that the assignment will be based upon. Encourage students to provide feedback and/or suggestions to suggest that students do have some ownership of their learning. The students will also self –assess themselves and their peers by completing a group evaluation form.

Furthermore, to insure that students are constructing their own knowledge, group work during the civil rights organization is imperative. The students will have a set of guiding questions that they will have to answer about their civil rights group. The presentation of these organizations will be to a panel of volunteer students from the school (ensure that these students acknowledge the seriousness of this presentation and that they are willing to participate as recruitees). By bringing in a panel of recruitees, the students will push themselves to be prepared since their ultimate goal is to recruit these 5 students. This learning experience not only enables our students to work with others, but also pushes them to learn from each other and from themselves for the teacher in this case is more of a guide on the side rather than the source of information.

This section should speak directly to teachers who may implement this unit in their classrooms. Questions to address include the following: How should the unit be paced? How should the unit be adapted for special populations? What are the particular strengths of the unit? What are potential challenges?

The teacher will need to download popular 1960s message songs, as well as modern day’s message musics. Some suggestions are

Dylan The Times They Are A-Changing
Baez, One Tin Soldier
Dylan & Baez, Blowing in the Wind
Phil Ochs, I Ain't Marching Anymore
Barry McGuire, Eve of Destruction
The Youngbloods, Let's Get Together
Buffalo Springfield, For What Its Worth
Paul McCartney, Imagine

Current songs:
John Mayer, Belief
Pink, Dear Mr. President

Pick one 1960s song and a modern song to analyze with the class. This activity will help the students as they writing and producing their own songs. They can get a picture of how a song is created and all the ways a message can be conveyed. The music project is a creative way to emulate the past and its connections to the present. The creative venture of this project will entice students but the performance/ song recording portion of this song will bring about some retaliation. Furthermore, many students might suggest re-writing lyrics for a song of their choice. This freedom to choose any song is something that as a teacher you decide. I have chosen to have my students pick popular songs of the 1960s to rewrite in order to constantly surround their historical understanding with the discussed time period.

Also, when teaching the Vietnam War, create a PowerPoint that is constructed out of only related photographs. I found the visual imagery of the War was more powerful than simply providing a lecture with words. Be sure to warn the students of some of the real gruesome pictures of the Vietnam war, such as the My Lai Massacre and the effects of our Napalm attacks. After the Vietnam War, allow time for students to take in the information you have taught them, and show the PBS clip on the Vietnamese environment after the Vietnam War. The emotional connection the students made during the lesson will help them empathetically respond to their homework assignment.

Additionally, if you cannot get 1960s magazines, I would suggest research and printing images you can find on the internet.

What follows is a suggested unit outline for pacing purposes:

Day 1- 2 :
• Write the essential question and discuss the implications of the question in regards to the unit plan
• Before beginning the lecture, ask the students to think about this question:
o How much do the 1960s shape our country?
• Show Youtube Clip: Kennedy –Nixon Debate
o Discuss with students their responses to who they liked better and to have them explain their reasoning
• Mini-lesson on the legacy of the JFK presidency & LBJ immediate succession
• Class activity & HW ( if not done in class)
o Place 3 magazines at each table. Allow students to discuss and interact with these magazines.
o Assignment : Write a Eulogy
 2- 3 Paragraphs, 400-500 words
 Make sure to include 4 specifics

Day 2-3:
• Lecture “Racing with the Russians”
• Journal reflection: How is democracy defined in this case? Did our actions emulate this definition?
• Introduce the Music Project to students
o assign them their 3 member group
o have them draw out of a box the song they will be working with
• Introduce and analyze as a class a message song of the 1960s:
o For What Its Worth by Buffalo Springfield

Day 3-6
• Hook: Analyze a modern message music song. Allow them to work in pairs for this one, but have them write their responses in their journals
• Lecture on the Vietnam War
o Discuss the photographs chosen & ask for students’ responses as if they were the American public of the 1960s.
• Journal reflection: How is democracy defined in this case? Did our actions emulate this definition?
• Filling out of the Graphic organizer of the Vietnam War’s Legacy.
• Show the PBS clip that reveals how the Vietnam Government censors the topic of the war.
o http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/stories/vietnam/
• Introduce homework assignment
Day 4-6
• Start class off with another song: this time have the students to individually analyze and evaluate the song’s meaning.
• Introduce the Grading rubric for the Music Project
• Introduce the Emergence of the Civil Rights Movement.
o Count students into four groups
o Provide them with the guidelines and expectations
o Provide them with a poster to display their presentation
• Group Work time to research their civil rights organization

Day 7-9
• Allow for groups to prep their presentation as the teacher preps the volunteers/panelists.
• Recruiter /recruitees presentation, Q&A, and debate
• Journal Response: How is democracy defined in this case? Did our actions emulate this definition?
• Class discussion on the 3 journal reflection on democracy. Write on the board all the definitions that students came up with and discuss and debate with each other the usage and implementation of these democratic ideals
• Analyze another song But this time, ask each student to individually reflect the musical trends and strategies of music producers and song writers for all those songs.
• Work time for music project

Day 10-11:
• Fun Counter Culture Day: all students will present their music and share with the class their message.
o Students fill out the peer evaluation sheet
• Students can make tye-dye sheets.

1960s Project: “Message Music” – Step by Step
1) Start with the Title:
Exercise: Write down at least five phrases. Mix and match words between phrases, substitute your own words, change the pronouns. Try to come up with at least one phrase that makes you want to write a song. Keep looking for more phrases until you have something you like. Draw a big circle around that phrase!
2) Then Ask Questions that connect to your Title.
a. Make a list of phrases, words, or images that are suggested by the title
EXERCISE: Go back and look at the title you circled. What questions does it suggest to you, ones that you want to answer in your lyric? After you have a couple of questions, make a list of words, images and phrases related to your title. Write them down quickly, in single words or short phrases. Don't think about rhyming or making sense at this point. Then, make a list of contrasting words, images, and phrases. Write as many words as you can think of.
3) Song Structure:
a. The most common contemporary song structure is verse / chorus / verse / chorus / bridge / chorus.
b. Definitions:
Verse: The verses in a song all have the same melody but different lyrics. The verse lyrics give us information about the situation, emotions, or people in the song.
Chorus: We may hear the chorus of a song three, four or more times. The lyric and melody remain the same each time it recurs. The chorus lyrics sum up the heart of the song. The title of the song almost always appears in the chorus section and may be repeated two or more times.
Bridge: The Bridge has a different melody, lyrics, and chord progression from the verse or chorus. It provides a break from the repetition of verse and chorus. The lyric often provide an insight or revealing moment.
Pre-chorus: Many of today's hits include a short section at the end of the verse that builds energy, letting the listener know that the chorus is coming. By creating a sense of anticipation, the chorus has even more punch when it finally arrives.
4) Play the song until you are familiar with the melody and sing along with the hit. Just doing this exercise will help you begin to acquire a "feel" for contemporary melodies. Read on for more.
EXERCISE: Replace the title of your hit song with your group’s; make sure it's a title you want to write about. List two or three questions suggested by the title and make your lists of related and opposite words. Write a chorus lyric using some of the words on your lists and answering the title questions. Play around with phrases and ideas to fit them into the hit song melody. After you finish your chorus, write your verses the same way.

1960’s Message Music Project
What distinguished music from the mid-1960s forward was the production of songs -- rock, folk, and blues -- with a social or political message. The music was an attempt to reflect upon the events of the time --- civil rights, the growing unrest over the war in Vietnam, and the rise of feminism. In many instances, the "message" within the song was simplistic. However, other songs received substantial airplay and became "anthems" at concerts, rallies, and demonstrations. Now it’s YOUR TURN. We will be analyzing the famous message songs of the 1960s and in return, your group will create a Message Song connecting the 1960s to 2000s. Consider the social messages your group wants to convey to society today.
Deadline: May 15
The Final Products due on that day.
o Lyrics sheet
o A Designed Album/Song Cover with descriptions of who did what?
o A Message Song – fully produced and revamped with your group’s new twist.

For What It's Worth
Buffalo Springfield


There's something happening here
What it is ain't exactly clear
There's a man with a gun over there
Telling me I got to beware

I think it's time we stop, children, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down

There's battle lines being drawn
Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Young people speaking their minds
Getting so much resistance from behind

I think it's time we stop, hey, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down

What a field-day for the heat
A thousand people in the street
Singing songs and carrying signs
Mostly say, hooray for our side

It's time we stop, hey, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down

Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you're always afraid
You step out of line, the man come and take you away

We better stop, hey, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down
Stop, hey, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down
Stop, now, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down
Stop, children, what's that sound
Everybody look what's going down

1960’s Top Billboard Hits:
1960: Percy Faith: Theme from a Summer Place
2) 1960 Jim Reeves- He’ll have to go
1961:Bobby Lewis- Tossin and Turnin
2) 1961 Patsy Cline – I Fall to Pieces
1962: Acker Bilk: Stranger on the Shore &
2) 1962 Ray Charles – I Can’t Stop Loving You
1963: Jimmy Gilmer & The Fireballs - Sugar Shack
2) 1963 Beach Boys – Surfin USA
1964: Beatles: I want to Hold your Hand
2) 1964 Beatles: She Loves Me
1965: Sam the Sham/ The Pharoahs : Woolly Bully
2) 1965 Four Tops : I can’t help myself
1966: SSgt Barry Sadler- Ballad of the Green Beret
2) 1966 The Association – Cherish
1967: Lulu- To Sir with Love
2) 1967 The Box Tops: The Letter
1968: The Beatles – Hey Jude
2) 1968 Paul Mauriat: love is blue
1969: The Archies – Sugar Sugar
2) 1969 The Fifth Dimension "Aquarius /Let The Sunshine In"

1960s Project: “Message Music”
1) Start with the Title:
Exercise: Write down at least five phrases. Mix and match words between phrases, substitute your own words, change the pronouns. Try to come up with at least one phrase that makes you want to write a song. Keep looking for more phrases until you have something you like. Draw a big circle around that phrase!
2) Then Ask Questions that connect to your Title.
a. Make a list of phrases, words, or images that are suggested by the title
EXERCISE: Go back and look at the title you circled. What questions does it suggest to you, ones that you want to answer in your lyric? After you have a couple of questions, make a list of words, images and phrases related to your title. Write them down quickly, in single words or short phrases. Don't think about rhyming or making sense at this point. Then, make a list of contrasting words, images, and phrases. Write as many words as you can think of.
3) Song Structure:
a. The most common contemporary song structure is verse / chorus / verse / chorus / bridge / chorus.
b. Definitions:
Verse: The verses in a song all have the same melody but different lyrics. The verse lyrics give us information about the situation, emotions, or people in the song.
Chorus: We may hear the chorus of a song three, four or more times. The lyric and melody remain the same each time it recurs. The chorus lyrics sum up the heart of the song. The title of the song almost always appears in the chorus section and may be repeated two or more times.
Bridge: The Bridge has a different melody, lyrics, and chord progression from the verse or chorus. It provides a break from the repetition of verse and chorus. The lyric often provide an insight or revealing moment.
Pre-chorus: Many of today's hits include a short section at the end of the verse that builds energy, letting the listener know that the chorus is coming. By creating a sense of anticipation, the chorus has even more punch when it finally arrives.
4) Choose a hit song! Make sure it's a song you like because you're going to be spending some time with it! Play the song until you are familiar with the melody and sing along with the hit. Just doing this exercise will help you begin to acquire a "feel" for contemporary melodies. Read on for more.
EXERCISE: Choose a hit song and replace the title with your group’s; make sure it's a title you want to write about. List two or three questions suggested by the title and make your lists of related and opposite words. Write a chorus lyric using some of the words on your lists and answering the title questions. Play around with phrases and ideas to fit them into the hit song melody. After you finish your chorus, write your verses the same way.

Message Music Project: Grading Rubric

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Content Connection Covers topic in-depth with appropriate historical connection(at least 4) to the 1960s. In depth knowledge about the topic is evident Covers the topic in depth with mostly appropriate historical fact, but may include only 3 historical connection. Knowledge about the topic seems to be good. Covers the topic with some historical fact, but may include only 2 historical connections. Content is minimal OR there is no connection to the 1960s.
Music Lyrics There is a lot of creativity and thought to the lyrics. They are moving and original. The lyrics include a song title and group name. Creativity and the thought put into the lyrics are adequate. They are moderately moving and original. The lyrics include a song title and group name. Creativity and thought put into the lyrics are less than adequate. The lyrics are not as moving and original. There may or may not be a song title and group name included. Lyrics are done poorly, with no song title or group name included.
Originality The CD jacket shows a large amount of original thought. Ideas are creative, inventive, and clearly connect to the song. The CD jacket shows some original thought. Work shows new ideas and insights. Uses other people's ideas (giving them credit), but there is little evidence of original thinking. Uses other people's ideas, but does not give them credit.
Delegation of Responsibility
Each student in the group can clearly explain what the message of the song is, what information s/he is responsible for, and provide a peer evaluation sheet.
Each student in the group can clearly explain what information s/he is responsible for locating.
Each student in the group can, with minimal prompting from peers, clearly explain what information s/he is responsible for locating.
One or more students in the group cannot clearly explain what information they are responsible for locating.

Presentation to class Outstanding. Well rehearsed and you are confident with the information you present. Enthusiasm!
Good presentation, but not much enthusiasm.
Not taking your presentation seriously. Laughing, and / or not focusing on your presentation.
Presentation does not portray your understanding of the project. Or no presentation was given.

PEER GROUP EVALUATION (To be submitted to instructor/s)
Your Name ____________________________________________
I. Names of your group members. (The letter corresponds to the
student's name.)
a._________________________________________________________________
b._________________________________________________________________
c._________________________________________________________________
d._________________________________________________________________
e._________________________________________________________________
Performance in the Learning Community
II. Rank each member (a,b,c,d,e) with a 4,3,2,1,0 (4=highest,0=lowest)
1. Reliable throughout the project
a._________ b.__________ c.__________ d.__________ e. ___________
2. Contributes ideas to the group
a.__________ b.__________ c._________ d. __________ e. ___________
3. Respects each group member's opinions
a.__________ b.__________ c._________ d.___________ e ___________
4. Contributes his/her share to discussions
a.__________ b.__________ c._________ d.__________ e. ____________
5. Knowledgeable about assignments and her/his role and fulfills that role
a.__________ b.__________ c._________ d.__________ e._____________
6. Gives input for work-in-progress promptly and with a good faith effort
a.___________ b.__________ c._________ d.__________ e.____________
III. If given the opportunity, would you want to work with this team member again?
("Yes"= 4 points; "Maybe"= 2 points; "No"= 0 points)
a.___________ b.__________ c._________ d.__________ e.__________
IV. In one sentence, what is your overall impression of each member's performance?
a) ___________________________________________________________________
b) ___________________________________________________________________
c) ___________________________________________________________________
d) ___________________________________________________________________
e) ___________________________________________________________________
[Don't base your evaluations on friendship or personality conflicts. Your input can be a valuable indicator to help assess
contributions in a fair manner. THESE EVALUATIONS WILL NOT BE SEEN BY YOUR GROUP MEMBERS.]

Vietnam War – Lesson Plan
Directions: Create a lesson plan outline in which you cover what you think is the most important element(s) [2-3] for people to remember about the Vietnam War. Select 3 photographs to help illustrate your lesson plan.
• Lesson Title: ________________________________________________________________________
• What are your Unit Goals? In the End, what do you want Vietnamese students to understand? ( Be sure not to be bias – one sided)
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
• Why do you think these topics are so important to understand and to learn about?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Why do you think the Vietnam government has censored the topic of Vietnam War in classrooms? Do you think that this is a logical response from the government? (Explain your reasoning)
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If you were the Vietnamese government, would you teach the Vietnam War? Explain your reasoning.
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Before During After
Treating Veterans


Press- War Coverage


The People’s Voice


International Reputation


Role of our Military

Civil Rights Movement: Group:_________________________________
The Better Vision for Black Americans
Student Names: __________________________________________________ Date ______________
Directions: Incorporate all of the following guidelines in your Presentation:
(a) Include General statements and few specific details about conditions facing black Americans during 1960s
(b) Include your organization’s mission statement and platform
(c) Discuss the solutions of your organization to solve the needs and problems confronted by the black community.
(d) Illustrate how your organization plans to achieve these solutions. (Example: demonstrations, sit-ins, etc…)
(e) Provide some successful movements and/or influential leaders of this group to persuade members to join.
(f) Justification of the choice: Why is this vision better? Give three or four reasons supporting this claim.
**** Be prepared to argue why the other groups’ visions are not as supportive to the cause as your organization’s is. (The four groups are SNCC, SCLC, CORE, AND BLACK PANTHERS)
**** Be prepared to answer scenario questions. How would your program respond?
**** Be prepared to answer questions from our participant