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Grade: 1-2
Subject: Art

#4581. Watercolor Paints

Art, level: 1-2
Posted Fri Mar 30 16:52:11 PDT 2012 by Edna Hansen (Edna Hansen).
Rawlins Elementary, Rawlins, WY USA
Materials Required: Varied
Activity Time: 45 Minute Lessons
Concepts Taught: Blending Colors, Using a Paintbrush, Collage, Collaboration

Unit: Watercolor Paints

Wyoming Standards, K-4 grade span:


FPA 4.1.A.1:
Students create and revise original art to express ideas, experiences and stories.
FPA 4.1.A.2:
Students investigate and apply a variety of materials, resources, technologies and processes to communicate experiences and ideas through art.
FPA 4.1.A.3:
Students apply the elements and principles of design to their artwork.
FPA 4.1.A.4:
Students collaborate with others in creative artistic processes.
FPA 4.1.A.5:
Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner.
FPA 4.1.A.6:
Students complete and exhibit their artwork.

ORGANIZATION OF CONTENT/INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN

NOTE: This is a “source unit” as described by Tyler (1949, pp. 101-103). It is not expected that the lessons will all be used, or used in order. I have written this as a two week unit. In fact, I would do the first five lessons within a two week span, and then spread the remaining five lessons throughout the next few months. This kind of distributed practice has been effective for building and maintaining skills and interest.

Watercolors Lesson 1 - 45 minute class period
Watercolor Exploration

Objectives:
1. Students will explore with watercolor paints.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.2

Materials:
White sulfite drawing paper 9x12
Sable watercolor “round” brushes Crayola size 10, 1 per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Plastic cups for water, 1 per student
Newspapers
Paper towels

Introduction:
Tell students that today they will get to use watercolor paints.

Procedure:
Give basic instructions for use of materials. (If you make a “mistake”, turn it into something else. Don’t paint too much in one area of the paper because this will cause a hole in the paper. Water is carried from the cup to the paint pans by the brush instead of pouring it in. Don’t paint on yourself, others, or other students’ papers.) Instruct students to use watercolor paints to create a picture or design of their choosing. Observe students as they use the materials to see how they are using the brushes and water. Record these observations for future reference. Checklist provided in the resources.

Watercolors Lesson 2 - 45 minute class period
Brushes and Paints

Objectives:
1. Students will use watercolor brushes correctly.
2. Students will control the amount of water added to paint pans.
3. Students will clean the brush effectively when changing colors.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.5

Materials:
White sulfite drawing paper 9x12
Sable watercolor “round” brushes Crayola size 10, 1 per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Plastic cups for water, 1 per student
Newspapers
Paper towels

Introduction:
Tell students that today they will learn techniques that will give them better control over the watercolor paints.

Procedure:
Using document camera and interactive white board demonstrate and explain using the brush to add water to a paint pan, painting using only the tip of the brush, and changing colors.
Adding water to paint: Swish the paintbrush in water. Tap out excess water on the side of the cup and then squeeze out water with finger and thumb. Dip just the tip of the brush in water and carry this to the paint. Use the tip of the brush to mix the water into the top of the paint pan. Test intensity of color on a corner of paper. If too dark, add another drop of water. If too light, mix some more.
Paint using only the tip: Load the tip of the brush with paint and begin applying it to the paper. When the brush begins to run out of paint, carry another drop of water to the paint tray, mix, and reload. (Without instruction students will tend to push down on the brush when it begins to run out of paint.)
Changing colors: Swish the brush in water until it is clean and then follow the steps as adding water to a paint pan.
Following instruction, have students use materials to create a picture or design of their own choosing.

Assessment:
Observe to see if students are using brushes and water correctly. Re-teach if needed.

Watercolors Lesson 3 - 45 minute class session
Color Wheel

Objectives:
1. Students will identify the primary and secondary colors.
2. Students will blend the primary colors to create the secondary colors.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5

Vocabulary:
Primary colors: The hues in the color spectrum that cannot be created by mixing other colors (red, blue, yellow).
Secondary colors: The hues that are created by mixing equal parts of the primary colors (orange, green, purple).

Materials:
Color Wheel from Resources, 1 copy for each student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, one per student
Watercolor brushes, one per student
Newspaper, Pater towels
Paper plates, 1 per student

Introduction:
Tell students that today they will be blending colors to make new colors and will be making their own color wheel.

Procedure:
Instruct students to add water to and prepare the red, yellow, and blue paint pans.
Using document camera and interactive white board, demonstrate using the prepared red, yellow, and blue paints to paint the large circles on the color wheel copy. Explain that these are the primary colors because they can’t be mixed by using other colors. Then demonstrate using the brush to carry a drop of red paint and a drop of blue paint to smaller circle between the red and blue circles. Have students blend these two colors and paint the smaller circle purple. Repeat using red and yellow paint to make orange, and yellow and blue paint to make green. Explain that purple (violet), green, and orange are the secondary colors because these are created by mixing equal parts of the primary colors.
When students have completed their color wheels they may create a picture or design using the primary and secondary colors. Ask individual students to identify the colors they are using and tell whether they are primary or secondary.

Watercolors Lesson 4 - 45 minute class period
Wet on Wet Watercolor

Objectives:
1. Students will explore effects of watercolors on wet paper.
2. Students will identify warm and cool colors.

Standards: 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Cool Colors – Blue, Green, and Purple. Cool colors appear to recede or go back in space.
Warm Colors – Red, Yellow, and Orange. Warm colors appear to advance or come forward in space.

Materials:
Watercolor paper, 1 sheet per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, 1 per student
Black construction paper, with Easter egg (autumn leaf, other seasonal shape cut out)
Newspaper, Paper towels, 1 per student
Large dishpan with a few inches of water

Introduction:
Have students think of the colors they associate with Easter (Spring, Fall, Thanksgiving, Christmas). Tell them they will be making an Easter picture by applying watercolors to wet paper.

Procedure:
Tell students that blue, green, and purple are the cool colors. Demonstrate the wet-on-wet technique using only these colors. Tell students that red, orange, and yellow are the warm colors. Demonstrate the wet-on-wet technique using these colors. Tell students that because the wet-on-wet technique allows colors to blend on their papers more than usual, they will need to limit their color choices somewhat. Ask students to choose either a warm or cool color scheme for their projects.
Have students get their papers wet by dipping it quickly through the dishpan. Have them prepare their chosen colors and then drop or brush the colors onto the paper. Tell them not to overwork the colors. When students have covered the whole paper and are satisfied with their colors, let the papers dry.
When the papers are completely dry, students glue the black construction paper “frame” over their papers, creating a beautiful Easter egg.

Formative Assessment:
Test students to determine their current knowledge of vocabulary: Primary colors, secondary colors, warm colors, and cool colors. Test form is included in Resources.

Remediation: Have students read Color Kittens and Mouse Paint. Have students complete the two remediation worksheets from the Resources.

Watercolors Lesson 5 - two 45 minute class periods
Crayon Resist Butterfly

Objectives:
1. Students will use what they know about symmetry (from Math Expressions Unit 7) to draw designs on a butterfly.
2. Students will use watercolor paint to finish a crayon drawing.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Crayon Resist: A technique using crayons to color areas of a composition. Areas that are not crayoned will absorb paint, while crayoned areas repel the paint.

Materials:
White Sulfite drawing paper 9x12
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Princeton Watercolor mop, ½ inch, 1 per student
Crayons
Newspaper for padding

Introduction:
Have students think about seeing a butterfly. Ask them to think about how a butterfly is shaped, how it is colored, how it moves. Tell students that today they will be creating their own butterfly.

Procedure:
Give students the paper they will be using. Ask them to begin drawing their butterfly by drawing a hot dog shape in the middle of the paper. Model this.
Have students draw the wings, instructing them to use the whole page. After they have drawn the wings, tell them that whatever design they draw on one wing should also appear on the other wing. Remind students that these are their own butterflies so they don’t need to try to copy actual butterflies.
Give each student a thick newspaper pad. Tell them that in coloring their butterflies they must apply a thick layer of crayon in order for the crayon resist to work. The newspaper pad will make the crayon fill in the paper better.
Encourage students to choose what color they will use for the painting and to avoid that color in coloring the butterfly. Encourage them to be imaginative in choosing colors, instead of trying to match a real butterfly.
Model the technique of leaving a space between colored shapes. Tell them that this space will absorb paint later in the project.
When the crayoning is complete, model for students how to use the mop brush to apply watercolor over the entire picture. Have the students watercolor their pictures and allow them to dry.

Assessment:
Observe student to see that they are applying a heavy coat of crayon in their intended areas, and leaving space between the crayoned areas. Check to see if the butterflies they draw are symmetrical.

Watercolors Lesson 6 – 45 minute class period
Inspired by Swirl by Swirl

Objectives:
1. Students will paint a spiral.
2. Students will modify the spiral to create a creature or plant.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Spiral: A curve that winds around a central point at a continuously increasingly distance.

Materials:
Swirl by Swirl by Joyce Sidman
White sulfite drawing paper, 1 per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, variety of sizes
Newspaper, Paper towels
Crayons

Introduction:
Read Swirl by Swirl to students. Ask the following questions:
1. Which animals curl their bodies into spirals? (Within the text)
2. Where do we see spirals in plants? (Within the text)
3. How are cozy spirals different from growing spirals? (Within the text)
4. Do we have any spirals in our classroom? (Beyond the text)

Procedure:
Have students begin by painting a spiral on their paper. Students will then turn the spiral into a creature or part of a creature by adding details or otherwise modifying the spiral. Students may add details to complete their pictures with crayons, pencils, or watercolors.

Assessment:
Observe students to see if they have created a spiral, and then added to it or modified it to produce their painting.

Watercolors Lesson 7 - 45 minute class period
Inspired by Grandpa Green

Objectives:
1. Students will use create a painting that shows an event from their family history.
2. Students will use a monochrome color scheme.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Monochrome: A picture or painting that uses shades of a single color.

Materials:
Grandpa Green by Lane Smith
White sulfite drawing paper, 1 per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, variety of sizes
Newspaper, Paper towels
Crayons

Introduction:
Read Grandpa Green to students. Ask the following questions:
1. Where did Grandpa Green grow up? (Within the text)
2. Where did Grandpa Green meet his wife? (Within the text)
3. How is Grandpa Green like your grandpa (uncle, dad)? (Beyond the text)
4. What stories does your family tell about your grandparents? (Beyond the text)

Procedure:
Have students think of a story from their family’s past. This may be an event that happened before the student’s birth or memory that has been passed down in family story, or it may be an event that they remember themselves.
Show students the illustrations again, pointing out the use of only one color (green) in them. Tell students that this is an example of monochrome painting. They will choose one color for their own painting and show differences in color by adding more or less water to modify the intensity.
Have students show the event they have chosen in a painting. They may choose to draw their pictures first with pencil or crayon and then apply the color with paint. Alternatively, they may choose to use paint as the only medium, or may color (using the same color of crayon as they have chose for their whole picture) the picture and then add paint for some areas or as an overall wash.

Assessment:
Observe students to see if they have used only one color, and if they have been able to create different intensities of that color by adding more or less water, or by coloring areas more or less completely.

Watercolors Lesson 8 - two 45 minute class periods
Inspired by Tumford the Terrible

Objective:
1. Students will use watercolor paints and other media to create a collage.
2. Students will create a picture of a mess they made.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Collage: Artwork that is made of objects glued onto a surface.

Materials:
Tumford the Terrible by Nancy Tillman
White sulfite drawing paper, 1 per student
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, variety of sizes
Newspaper, Paper towels
Crayons, magazines for cutting, construction paper
Fabric scraps, stickers, yarn

Introduction:
Read Tumford the Terrible to students. Ask the following questions:
1. What did Tumford do to the squashes? (Within the text)
2. What kind of pie did Violet make for Tumford? (Within the text)
3. Why did Violet and Georgy call the cat Tummy? (Within the text)
4. How do you know your family still loves you when you make a mess? (Beyond the text)

Procedure:
Show students the illustrations again, pointing out details that have been added with other media. Ask students to think of a time when they (or someone in their family) made a really big mess. Tell students that today they will make a picture of their big mess.
Students may draw their pictures first using pencil or crayon and then apply color with watercolor paints, or they may choose to use the crayon resist method.
After paintings are finished, encourage students to search in magazines for small pictures to cut out and apply to their paintings as details. Students may also use stickers, pieces of fabric or yarn. They may draw items to be included in their paintings on colored construction paper, and then cut them out and apply them. Students may choose to create elements for their collages by painting them, and then cutting them out when dry for application along with other elements to a background paper.

Assessment:
Observe students as they are creating their works to make sure they are finding or making the elements they want to include in their collages.

Watercolors Lesson 9 – 45 minute class period
Inspired by I Want My Hat Back

Objectives:
1. Students will use watercolors to express part of their personal history.
2. Students will exhibit their artwork.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Emphasis: The artist makes part of the composition stand out. In this book, the illustrator used color to give emphasis.

Materials:
I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen
White sulfite drawing paper 9x12
Watercolor 8 pan sets, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, variety of sizes
Newspaper, Paper towels


Introduction:
Read I Want My Hat Back to students. Ask the following questions:
1. Who did the bear ask first about his hat? (Within the text)
2. Which animal had the bear’s hat? (Within the text)
3. What happened to the rabbit? (Within the text)
4. What have you lost that you would like (or would not like) to get back? (Beyond the text)

Procedure:
Tell students that today they will be creating a picture that tells the story of losing something and how they feel about losing it. Ask students to think about and plan their composition before they begin. Will they show the thing they lost, or will they show its absence? How will they show how they feel about losing it? Students may draw their picture first using pencil or crayons and then apply color with the paint, or they may use paint as the only medium.

Display: Students choose their work from this or a previous project for inclusion in the Carbon County Fair art display. Students fill out submission forms and attach these to their work.

Assessment:
Observe student to make sure they are using materials correctly. Remind them or re-teach as needed.

Watercolors Lesson 10 – 45 minute class period
Inspired by Stuck

Objectives:
1. Students will collaborate with others in the creation of a group picture.
2. Students will respond creatively to text.

Standards: FPA 4.1.A.1, 4.1.A.2, 4.1.A.3, 4.1.A.4, 4.1.A.5, 4.1.A.6

Vocabulary:
Collaboration: Working together to meet a goal.

Materials:
Stuck by Oliver Jeffers
White sulfite drawing paper
Watercolor 8 pan paints, 1 per student
Watercolor brushes, variety of sizes
Butcher paper, brown and green, to create a large tree

Introduction:
Read Stuck to students. Ask the following questions:
1. What got stuck in the tree first? (Within the text)
2. What did the boy throw into the tree to knock down the milkman? (Within the text)
3. Why did the boy keep throwing things into the tree after the first things got stuck? (Within the text)
4. When they boy went to bed, what was he forgetting? (Within the text)
5. When you have a problem, what do you do if the first thing you try doesn’t work? (Beyond the text)

Procedure:
Tell students that today they will participate in a group art project. Each student will need to paint one of the things that got stuck in the tree. Have students choose which stuck item to paint. Students may choose to draw their pictures first with pencil or crayon, and then apply color with paint. When dry, these pictures will be cut out and mounted on the large butcher paper tree. Display finished tree in the classroom.

Summative Assessment:
Have students complete the summative assessment included in the Resources.
Also do a performance assessment. Observe students as they paint their pictures to see if they are using paintbrushes correctly and are controlling the amount of water they add to the paint pans. Record results on the original checklist used at the beginning of the unit.

Additional Activities:

View BrainPOP movies about painting at:
http://www.brainpop.com/artsandmusic/artconcepts/painting/
This movie has good general information about various types of paints and the ways painting is used in different cultures.
http://www.brainpopjr.com/artsandtechnology/art/colors/
This movie has an excellent detailed explanation about color blending. However, it also contains a repeated image of a rainbow (a favorite form for students to paint, and something they tend to limit themselves to), so is suggested for use after the students have done the lessons.

BrainPOP movies are available with a one-month free trial subscription.
Suggested Culminating Activity:
Take students to visit an art museum. The UW Art Museum provides an excellent program that includes a tour and a planned art activity in the Shelton Studio.


References:

Tyler, R. (1949). Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Wyoming Fine and Performing Arts Content and Performance Standards retrieved from
http://edu.wyoming.gov/Libraries/Standards/2011_Fine_and_Performing_Arts_Content_and_Performance_Standards_-_DRAFT.sflb.ashx

Smith, L. (2011). Grandpa Green. New York, NY: Roaring Brook Press.

Klassen, J. (2011). I Want My Hat Back. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

Sidman, J. (2011). Swirl by Swirl. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Brace.

Jeffers, O. (2011). Stuck. New York, NT: Harper Collins

Tillman, N. (2011). Tumford the Terrible. New York, NY: Feiwel and Friends.

Walsh, E.S. (1989). Mouse Paint. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Inc.

Brown, M.W. (1949). Kitten Colors. New York, NY: Random House.

Color Wheel retrieved from http://www.kidzone.ws/science/as-bwheel.htm


RESOURCES:

Student Responses to Questions About Art
1. What kind of art do you like to look at?
a. I like cartoons.
b. I like to look at the best art.
c. I like to look at horse paintings.
d. I like to look at lowriders.
e. I like to look at princess art.
f. Dragons
g. I would like to look at a picture.
h. I like to look at flames.
i. I like to look at the best art ever because I love art.
j. I like to look at different kinds of monster trucks.
k. I like to look at the best ones of art.
l. I like to see fragile art.
m. I like to look at art that looks like Army. (Camouflage?) Yes
n. Tree frogs.
2. Where do you go to see great art?
a. To my grandpa’s.
b. To an art show.
c. I see art at an art show.
d. I go to see great art at the art museum.
e. An art show.
f. Casper
g. I would go to see great art at the museum.
h. I see great art after school.
i. I go to see art at art shows.
j. California
k. I go to the Boys and Girls club to see great art.
l. Rock Springs art is cool.
m. I like to go to Alaska. You see pictures of the woods there.
n. Cheyenne
3. What happens when you mix red and yellow paint?
a. It turns into black.
b. It makes pink paint.
c. When you mix red and yellow it makes orange.
d. If you mix red and yellow paint it turns into orange.
e. It makes orange.
f. It makes orange.
g. Red and yellow paint makes orange.
h. When you mix red and yellow paint it makes orange.
i. If you mix red and yellow paint you get orange.
j. It makes orange.
k. It turns into orange.
l. It makes orange.
m. It makes orange.
n. Orange.
4. What do you need to know to be a better artist?
a. You need to follow your passion.
b. You need to know how to make good art.
c. You need 1. paint, 2. a brush, 3. paper.
d. To be a better artist you need to know how to paint.
e. You need to listen to the directions.
f. Work carefully.
g. To be a better artist I try to write well.
h. To be a great artist you need to know how to draw a line.
i. I need to be a better artist with lots of creativity.
j. Work carefully.
k. You need some paint to make art.
l. To go to art school.
m. To go to art school.
n. Work carefully.
5. Why is it important to learn about art?
a. Because you would know how to do art.
b. It is important to learn about art because art is good.
c. It is important to learn about paint.
d. It is important to learn about art because it’s cool.
e. So you don’t mess up.
f. So you can be a great artist and make better art.
g. It is important to learn about art because you could draw.
h. It is important to learn about art because it is fun.
i. It is important to learn about art so you can be yourself.
j. It is important to learn about art because it is great to create.
k. It is important to learn about art because you need to learn about art.
l. Art is important because art is cool.
m. So you can be a better artist.
n. To write about important artists.
6. How does creating art make your life better?
a. I like art because I love it.
b. Creating art makes my life better because I like art.
c. Creating art makes my life better because I like drawing.
d. Art makes my life feel cool.
e. It makes my life better because it is cool.
f. Creating art makes my life better because I get to make art.
g. Creating art makes my life feel better because it feels like it is my job!
h. Creating art makes my life better because it is fun.
i. Creating art makes my life better because art is my best passion.
j. Art makes my life better because art is awesome.
k. Art makes my life better because it is great to make art.
l. Art makes my life better because art makes me happy.
m. Art makes my life better because it is fun.

Checklist – Use for observations with Lesson 1 and Performance Assessment with Lesson 10
Student Name
Use of brush Use of paint Use of brush Use of paint


Pre-test date: Post-test date: 
Color Wheel – Use with Lesson 3


Formative Assessment Use after Lesson 4
Name_____________________________________
Choose the words from the word box to correctly answer each question. Write the words on the lines provided. You will use each word twice.


1. Which are the primary colors?

___________________ ____________________ _____________________

2. Which are the secondary colors?

___________________ ____________________ _____________________

3. Which are the cool colors?

___________________ ____________________ _____________________

4. Which are the warm colors?

___________________ ____________________ _____________________
Remediation - Use if needed.
Name _______________________
Complete the color blending exercises below.
Red, yellow, and blue are the Primary colors.
What color is created when you blend red and yellow? _________ This is a secondary color.
What color is created when you blend red and blue? _________ This is a secondary color.
What color is created when you blend yellow and blue? _________ This is also a secondary color.

Remediation - Use if needed.
Name _____________________________

Look at this picture of flames. What colors do you see in the flames?
_________________ __________________ __________________
These are the warm colors.

Look at the picture of a winter scene. What colors do you see in the sky, the trees, and the distant mountain? _____________________ ____________________ ____________________
These are the cool colors.
Summative Assessment – Use after final lesson.
Name ____________________________
For each question, choose the best answer from the box. Write the letter for the answer on the line.
1. What are the Primary colors? ___
2. What are the Secondary colors? ___
3. What are the warm colors? ___
4. What are the cool colors? ___
5. What does monochrome mean? ___
6. What is a collage? ___
7. What is emphasis? ___
8. What is a spiral? ___
9. What is Crayon Resist? ___
10. What is collaboration? ___
11. What is symmetry? ___



Helen McCrea

To:
M
Edna Hansen

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 9:30 AM


Edna, sorry it took me so long to get back with you. Thank goodness for teachers like you! It sounds like you are already there when it comes to Art instruction. As you already know you can tie Art to any subject and make it fascinating for your students. I do have a list of some of the objectives we look for in 6th graders.
1 correct use of materials and supplies
How to use a pencil and paint brush
How to clean and care for those supplies like paint brushes
2 Start talking about the elements of art as a vocabulary, introduce the terms and concepts.
3 introduce color, color wheel, mixing colors, warm and cool colors
4 use of a ruler, geometric shapes
5 lines and shapes( as you are already doing)
6 Introduce an artist, someone you like


Edna Hansen

Actions
To:
M
Helen McCrea
Sent Items
Thursday, March 22, 2012 7:52 AM


Hi Helen. Without instruction in art for the first six years students are in school, I'm sure they're all REALLY behind by the time you get them. I'm a mere 1st grade teacher with no influence in the school. I do like to include art activities for my own students and they really love it. Right now I am writing an instructional unit for one of my own classes and want to write it about art (I always try to target a topic that my students would choose if they were the deciders). Please tell me what you would like students to already know or be able to do when you get them. What experiences and/or skills would you like them to already have?
I have looked up art objectives for 1st grade on the internet and they are pretty consistent with what I remember from my previous school. I work with students using different kinds of lines and shapes, blending colors, and I give them lots of opportunities to practice with liquid glue. I'm not so keen on teaching them to use a paintbrush correctly, but I work on it. What do you want them to know? Please tell me.
Thanks!
Edna Hansen