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Grade: Elementary

#957. "C" letter ideas

Reading/Writing, level: Elementary
Posted Thu Apr 8 12:37:43 PDT 1999 by Jan k/ne and the Early Childhood Ring (jblecha@genie.esu10.k12.ne.us).
Dudley Elementary,
Concepts Taught: "C" letter activities

C letter ideas

Letter Cc

Caterpillars

song: Arabella Miller (to Twinkle, Twinkle)

Little Arabella Miller
Had a fuzzy caterpillar.
First, she put it on her mother
Then upon her baby brother.
All said,"Arrabella Miller!
Take away your caterpillar."

Have all the students cut out the letter C and link them to make a giant
caterpillar crawling on the wall.

Study life cycle of the caterpillar.
Compare butterflies and moths.

song: Metamorphosis ( sung to Skip to My Lou)

I'm a little egg under a leaf. (Children folded up on knees)
I'm a little egg under a leaf.
I'm a little egg under a leaf.
That's the first part of my metamorphosis.

I'm a hungry caterpillar eating up leaves. (crawl around floor)
I'm a hungry caterpillar eating up leaves.
I'm a hungry caterpillar eating up leaves.
That's the second part of my metamorphosis.

I make a chrysalis and take a nap inside. (On knees with fists on head as
I make a chrysalis and take a nap inside. attachment to branch. Sway in
I make a chrysalis and take a nap inside. breeze)
That's the third part of my metamorphosis.

I emerge as a beautiful butterfly. (Flutter around with straight arms-
not like
I emerge as a beautiful butterfly. birds.)
I emerge as a beautiful butterfly.
That's the fourth part of my metamorphosis.

Sheryl/k/MA
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Cleo is a clever cat, clever cat
Cleo is a cute cat, cute cat.
Cleo is a calico cat, calico cat.
Cleo is a cool cat, cool cat.
Cleo is a copycat, copycat,
Cleo is a clever, cute, calico, cool, copycat.
use this as a chant with a clap, snap rhythm. You clap on all the words and
snap on cat. Sometimes the children hop or jump instead of snapping
•Sort Bottle Caps or Milk Caps

•Crayon Melting
Cover old heating or warming try with aluminum foil and heat up. Let
children
lay their papers on the tray and draw with crayons. The wax melts and
soaks
into the paper. Let wax dry. These are fun to hang in windows for a
stained
glass effect.

•Make, Decorate and Eat “C” Shaped Cookies

•Big C Shape
Cut out big C shapes from construction paper or posterboard and paste on
cereal.
Cut out big C shapes from construction paper or posterboard and make a
collage.


•Cactus
Read the One Hundred Year Old Cactus - show the children a cactus plant.
The
Christmas cactus is especially nice and blooms around December. Help
the
children compare the cactus with other plants. Point out that since a
cactus
needs less water than other plants, it canlive and grow in hot, dry
areas.

•Calendar
Remind the children that calanders help us keep track of the days,
weeks,
months of the year. Make a calendar for each month. Review the day of
the
week and the date each day. Practice saying the days of the week from
memory.

•Candle
Provide art supplies for children to make pretend candles. Use
toilet-paper
tubes for the candle. Help the children paint the tubes with tempra.
Show
them how to stuff red, orange and yellow tissue paper in the top of the
tubes
for the flame then glue a strip of construction paper around the base
for the
candle holders. Help them glue the tubes to small paper plates.

•Candy
Discuss why cake, candy, cupcakes and cookies should not be eaten often
- help
them make a list of some foods that are heathier (carrots,cucumbers,
etc)

•Candy Cane
Make a candy cane with pipe cleaners - use one white and one red - twist
the
pipe cleaners to make a striped stem. Bend them into a candy cane
shape.

•Cards
*Sort a deck of playing cards - sort them according to suits - then
sequence

*Play card games such as "war", "Uno", "Old Maid", "fish". use the
cards just
under 5 for the littler kids.

*Collect old Christmas cards - use them to make a Christmas Card
alphabet
book.

•Carrot
Have several carrots on hand - clean and cook some of the carots -
invite them
to taste raw and cooked carrots - ask how they are alike and different.
Take
a survey - graph the results.

Give each child a carrot - show them how to draw a simple carrot. Help
them
describe a real carrot using all of their senses. Cut real carrots into
2-3"
pieces - use them like a rubber stamp - dip in orange tempra - print to
make a
letter C

Read the Carrot Seed - grow a carrot - choose a carrot that still has
green
leaves and stems attached - cut the carrot 2" from the top - place in a
shallow bowl - place pebbles around the carrot then half fill with water
- set
in a sunny window - new sprouts will appear in about a week. Once the
carrot
has sprouted - plant it in some soil and enjoy watching it grow.

•Cars
Invite the children to cut out pictures of cars from old magazines -make
a
collage.

Discuss why we have cars - what other types of vehicles are there?

Have the kids bring toy cars from home to share. Help them arrange the
cars
in a letter C! Read Cars by Anne Rockwell.

Kids love to make car noises. Let them following you along a imaginary
road
and pretend to be cars. Go fast and "zoom" go slowly, stop quickly and
"eek"
as brakes work - go around lots of curves - putt-putt-putt with engine
trouble
- etc...

•Cassette
Cut a large C and hang it over your cassette recorder - help them learn
to use
it.

Tape the kids as a group or individually saying the ABC's counting and
singing
songs. Replay the tape - let them guess who is who

Have the children bring a cassette tape from home to share

•Cat
Draw a simple cat shape on a large piece of paper - (if the kids are old
enough have them draw it) have the children paint their cats Black and
cut
them out when the paint is dry. Have them add eyes and wiskers -

Read Cat in the Hat, Have You Seen My Cat?, Cats! Cats! Cats, Millions
of
Cats, Calico Cat Looks at Colors. Let them draw pictures of their
favorite
story book cat

Make paper doll cats -

Play Copycat - stand in front of the group and demonstrate a movement
such as
shaking your arm, making a funny face, standing on one foot, etc.
Challenge
the children to copy you - after you have acted out 4-5 movements invite
the
children to take turns being the leader.

Place carbon paper between two pieces of paper -staple them together -
have
them draw C's and cats then pull apart the carbon paper to reveal the
copy
underneath.

•Catalog
Have an assortment of catalogs available. Let the children browse
through and
cut out five favorite items - glue them on construction paper - C is for
Catalogs

•Clay
Encourage the children to play with clay - Make clay - let me know if
you need
a recipe

Collect a variety of cookie cutters - use them as clay shapers - look
for
large seasonal cutters and alphabet cutters too

•Clean
Emphasize putting toys away when finished playing - give out best
cleaner
buttons to children who help

Set up a Cleaning Center - include a small broom, mop, dustpan, sponge,
apron,
feather duster, vacuum, etc.... Demonstrate the proper use then
encourage the
children to try

•Clock
make paper clocks on paper plates - Attach construction paper hands with
brads. Identify the big hand and little hand -if the children are old
enough
use the clocks to tell the time and hour

Discuss why we have clocks - Play Rock around the Clock - Wee Sings
Round the

Clock soung (explains the function of a clock)

•Cloth
Explain that cotton grows on plants. Cotton is made into thread, the
thread
is woven into cloth and the cloth is sewn into clothing. Read From
Cotton to
Pants - Cut cotton cloth into strips. Invite the children to fel the
cloth
and decide whether warm or cold weather clothing shoud be made from
cotton.

Use Cotton Balls to make a letter C

Read Corduroy books - let the children feel some cordury - discuss why
the
bear might have been named Corduroy.

Discuss why we wear coats - cut pictures from magazines - - make a
closet for
the coats by folding a piece of construction paper the long way - glue a
small
construction paper circle on the closet for a doorknob and write "My
Coat
Closet" glue the picures of the coats inside.

•Clouds
Read Hi Clouds - use tempra to make large gray or white clouds on blue
paper -
to give the clouds texture glue cotton to some of them.

Fold a sheet of paper in half - drop a large dab of white tempra along
the
inside fold - have the children refold the paper - and smooth it with
their
hands. Open the paper to reveal a cloud.

Read It Looked Like Spilt Milk - If possible, on a nice cloudy day take
the
kids outside - and lie down on blankets and watch the clouds go by -
discuss
the shapes.

•Clover
If Clover is in season have the children pick some - Cut a large Letter
C -
glue the clovers on.

•Clown
Paint clown faces on all interested children. Take pictures of your
cute
clowns

make a clown face out of a paper plate, const paper, and an inflated
balloon.
Have them color a clown face - then punch a small hole in the center of
the
face - help the kids pull the knot of the balloon through the hole and
tape
the know in the back.

Read the Clown-Arounds and C Is for Clown - have the children draw their
favorite clowns

•Coal
Make coal or charcoal crystals. put coal or charcoal briquets in a tray
- mix
together 2 TBS each - salt, water, bluing (avail in the laundry section
) pour
over coal or charcoal. Add drops of food coloring whever - coat each
piece
with a few drops of ammonia - the next morning you should see crystals
beginning to form - if not repeat the process

Draw pictures with charcoal = spreat lots of newspapers

•Coconut
Demonstrate how to crack a coconut - cut the coconut into little chunks
-
invite the children to sample the coconut and the coconut milk.

•Coins
Have an assortment of coins on hand - let the children help count the
number
of coins - sort them into stacks - discuss how they are alike and
different

Have the children place coins under typing paper - rub the side of a
crayon
over the place where the coin is under the paper -

Give each child a penny, a nickel, a dime and a quarter - hold up one
coin -
have the children hold up a matching coin

Put one coin inside a feely bag - invite the children to reach inside
and see
if they can guess which coin it is.

•Cold
Glue pictures of hot and cold foods on index cards - help the children
sort
the pictures into hot and cold categrories

•Colors
Read Colors, Is It Red? Is It Yellow? Is It Blue?. Cut a large
letter C
from const. paper - let the kids use water colors to paint the C
different
colors.

Hold up objects and ask the children to name the color.

Play "I Spy"

Sort colored blocks, buttons, jar lids, etc... by color

Write color words on flash cards for older children - practice reading
the
words aloud

Set up a Coloring Center - place crayons, coloring books, drawing paper,
tracing paper, markers, colored pencils, etc...

Make color caterpillars - give the children construction paper circles -
one
for each of the eight basic colors - tape one circle to a classroom
wall. Add
eyes and antenna to make the caterpillars head.

•Comics
Have the children share their favorite comic strips.

Save the Sunday comics and daily comics - cut the comic strips into
separate
frames, cut out a large construction paper C - glue comic frames on the
letter
C - if they are old enough have them sequence them

•Computer
Teach them a computer game - Try Jump Start for Toddlers - or My Very
First
Software - All of the Disney Animated Story Books are good - Magic
School Bus
is good too!

•Cookies
Make Chocolate Chip Cookies with the kids - a triple C word

•Corn
Read Corn Is Maize: The Gift of the Indians - make cornbread

Cut out 2 Letter C's - spread w/glue - sprinkle one with cornmean and
the
other with popcorn kernels.

Make Corn on the Cob - have the children list other foods that are
yellow

•Counting
Teach the kids a counting song - One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, Ten Little
Fingers,
5 Little Monkeys, etc.....

Read Anno's Counting Book - One, Two, Three - One Was Johnny: A Counting
Book,
etc... Have the children count anything you have on hand

•Crawl
Sponsor crawling relays. Draw two large letter C's on the floor w/chalk
or
tape - have the chlidren crawl along the C.

have the kids make C shapes with their bodies.

•Cream
Invite the children to fingerpaint with shaving cream - have them write
some
Letter C's in the cream

•Cucumbers

•C is for cookie
Just this week we were singing C is for cookie and made up a bunch of
verses c
is for cake, carrots, celery, cabbage, cauliflower, and as many things
they
can think of. It is so easy to sing.
C is for Cookie, thats good enough for me, C is for cookie, thats good
enough
for me, C is for cookie, thats good enough for me. Cookie, Cookie,
cookie.
Cookie starts with C!

•Cutting
Let the children practice free cutting - start with snipping -give them
strips
of paper - (make sure the width is only about 2/3 the width of the
scissor
blade) have the children snip - the strip - glue the pieces on a letter
C to
make a masaic

Show the children how to cut fringe.

•Castles
Use PT and TP rolls to make a castle - cut slits in the tops to attach
to
other rolls to make varying heights - use imagination! Paint the tubes
goldish and use sponge squares in red paint to make it look like a stone
castle.

•Clown Bank
Tape a round piece of cardboard to each end of the PT tube. Cut a slot
for
the clowns mouth. (make it big enough for coins to fit through). Paint
the
tube white. Glue yarn hair and clown features cut from paper.

•Curly Caterpillars
Have the children glue colored paper strips (aprox 1 1/2 X 8 inch) into
rings.
Glue six or seven rings together to form a long caterpillar. The
children can
draw faces and use pipe cleaners as antennae.

•Calico Cats
Supply fabric or wallpaper scraps for cutting out the head and body of
the
cat. Have the children add features with markers and/or crayons. Have
each
child tell something about their Cat. Write out what the children say in
their
own words, then have them find and circle the Cs in their recitations.

•Cave
Make a cave in one corner of the play area by draping sheets or blankets
over
some tables. Let the children pretend to be caterpillars crawling in and
out
of the cave. Ask them to make the hard sound of C as they crawl around.

•Catch It!
Cut off the tops of plastic milk jugs with handles to use as receptacles
for
catching balls and beanbags that the children can "toss" to each other.
Remind
the children to be cautious when doing this activity.


•Crazy Caterpillar Critters
Provide a variety of vegetables that begin with the letter C, such as
celery,
carrots, cucumbers, cabbage and cauliflower. Cut these into small pieces
and
rounds. Have them assemble a caterpillar in the shape of a C by sticking
the
vegetables together with peanut butter or cream cheese. Give each child
a
piece of cabbage to be the "grass" under the crazy critter.


•Cc Foods To Try
Cabbage, cake, cantaloupe, carrot juice, carrots, carrot salad, cashews,
casserole, catfish, catsup, cauliflower, clamato juice, clams, cobbler,
cocoa,
coconut, cold cuts, cole slaw, collard greens, consomme', cookies, corn
bread,
corned beef, corn dogs, corn muiffins, corn-on-the-cob, cottage cheese,
crab,
crab apples, crackers, cranberries, cream, cream cheese, creamed corn,
crepes,
cucumbers, cupcakes, curry, custard


•Chicken Pox Pancakes:
Strawberries
Pancake mix
Bananas
Powdered sugar

Chop the berries into small chunks, allowing one or two per pancake
face.
Set aside.

Prepare the pancake mix according to package directions. When the
pancakes
are done, place each serving in a stack on a separate plate.

For every two stacks of pancakes, you need to peel one banana.
Carefully
slice off the two ends and put one on top of each stack for a nose.
Then
cut two thin slices from each end for eyes. Then cut banana in half for
a
long curved mouth.

Arrange the strawberry chunks chicken pox all around each face. Drop a
pinch of powdered sugar on each pox for a tasty bit of puss. Serves as
many
little polka dotted people as your heart desires.

•Cookies
Make a cookie game. Cut out a round circle from brown const. paper.
Using a
paper punch, make some darker "chocolate chips". Things to do with
this:
~Let them count out the chips and glue them on the "cookie".
~Arrange the "chips"(in shapes, as a face, by groups, etc.) before
gluing on.
~Make larger "chips" and put numbers on them. Have them glue in order.
With the larger "chips", put the letters of their name, see if they can
arrange properly, then glue.

•The Biggest Cookie In The World (written by Linda Hayward, ill. by Joe
Ewers) is a simple Sesame Street book which kids love to "read" (they
can
memorize it very quickly).

•.Chocolate Chip Cookies (written by Karen Wagner, ill. by Leah Palmer
Preiss) is simple instructions for making them.

•.If You Give A Mouse A Cookie (written by Laura Joffe Numeroff, ill. by
Felicia Bond) is a great book for sequencing activities; have the kids
help
tell the story with small props to represent all the parts of the story
[Lakeshore also has a storytelling apron kit for this story, there is a
CD-ROM available, and an adorable cassette with activity songs].

•Alligator Cookies (James Young) is a rhyming book which can be read
with
older (4 and 5) children; it includes a recipe for no-cook green
cornflake and
peanut butter cookies.

•The Doorbell Rang (Pat Hutchins) is a wonderful math and sharing story;
Make reproductions of the people in the story which can be used on a
chalkboard [could also be flannel/velcro] with magnetic cookies--the
children love retelling story and playing with the manipulatives.

•"Who Stole The Cookie?"-traditional game---if anyone needs the words, I
think I have them.

•"Cookies in the Bakery Shop"-one child is baker, others are either
cookies
or customers; baker counts cookies and we say: "[number] little cookies
in
the bakery shop, All prettied up with sugar on top, Along came [child's
name]
with a penny to spend, She [or he] bought a cookie and away they went"
this
is repeated as each customer buys a cookie until there are none left and
then
we pick a new baker (my students insist on doing this several times!)

• 8.class graph-"Which of these cookies do you like best?" Have a few
to
sample, trying to represent different cultures in my daycare.

•dramatic play and playdough-both house area and playdough table are
stocked with cookie sheets, rolling pins, etc.

•Also, for craft stuff, you could have the kids cut out a cookie shape
and
have different "ingredients" to glue on them-like, chocolate chips,
nuts,
pieces of hard candy, cheerios or fruit loops.

•"The Runaway Cookies" from Storytelling with the Flannel Board (Book1)
.
Patterns for the flannel board include a cookie jar with a lid that
comes
off, a gingerbread man, a rabbit, a duck, a teddy bear and a lamb.

The Runaway Cookies

The cookie jar people
Hopped out one night
When the cookie jar lid
Was not on tight.

The gingergread man
Opened raisin eyes
And looked about

In great surprise.

The frosted bunny
Twinkled his nose
And danced around
On his cookie toes.

The sugary duck
Began to quack
And shake the sugar
Off his back.

The cinnamon bear
Could only grunt
For he was too fat
To do a stunt.

The coconut lamb
Jumped up so high
That his little white tail
Flew toward the sky.

They were all so happy
To be at play
That they danced and danced
And danced away.

They danced away
So very far
That they never came back
To the cookie jar.

•Cc Books to Explore
Corn Is Maize - by Aliki
The Brave Cowboy - by Joan Anglund
Anno's Counting Book - by Mitsumasa Anno
C Is for Clown - by Stan and Janice Berenstain
One Two Three: An Animal Counting Book - by Marc Brown
Have You Seen My Cat? By Eric Carle
The Very Hungry Caterpillar - by Eric Carle
Calico Cat Looks at Colors - Donald Charles
The Clown-Arounds - Joanna Cole
Ten Black Dots - Donald Crews
Clothes - Peter Curry
One, Two, Three - Peter Curry
New Clothes for Alex - Mary Dickinson
Corduroy - (many in the series) Don Freeman
Millons of Cats - Wanda Gag
The Candy Corn Contest - Patricia Giff
Hi, Clouds - Carol Greene
Is It Red, Is It Yellow, Is It Blue - Tana Hoban
The One-Hundred Year Old Cactus - Anita Holmes
The Carrot Seed - Ruth Kraus
>From Cotton to Pants - Ali MitgutschColors - by John Reiss
Cars - Anne Rockwell
One Was Johnny: A Counting Book - Maurice Sendak
Cat In the Hat - Dr. Seuss
It Looked Like Spilt Milk - Charles Shaw
Cats! Cats! Cats! - Bernard Wiseman

From: mriva@iafrica.com

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
For letter C..I have the students build a catepillar by cutting out circles on
a page that has many circles of all the same size but with different letters
inside of these circles. The children are only to cut out the ones that have
an upper or lower case Cc inside and then given a catepillar head they are
encouraged to build his body using the circles with the C's and creat a
pattern of upper and lower case C's for the body. Once it is all glued down
they can add the head and legs.

Teach all the different colors..Primary , secondary and intermediate.

Cathy
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
*caterpillars, cupcakes, cake, Coke, corn, candy, carrots, cotton, colors,
coins, crayons, candy, cookies
*read The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
*give each student a picture of a caterpillar and foods to color. Students
cut out pictures of foods that start with /c/ to glue to the caterpillar
picture
*use coins as counters
*practice writing Cc
*glue cotton balls to large C shape
*use crayons as counters
*make a C poster by cutting pictures from magazines that begin with /c/
*glue corresponding number of cottonballs onto paper labeled with a number
*place objects that begin with /c/ and ones that do not onto a carpet. As you
remove each object, have students identify it. When all objects have been
removed, allow students to take turns place the objects back onto the carpet
that begin with /c/
*count candy into cups labeled with numbers
*color and decorate a cupcake
*eat cupcakes
*allow students to ice and decorate their own cupcake
*use play dough to make letters Cc; use laminated number masters if needed
*crawl across the floor
*walk like a cat
*clap your hands
*pretend to:
~eat cotton candy
~catch a caterpillar
~put on a coat
~cut a piece of cake
~open a can of carrots
~eat corn on the cob
*use carrots and corncobs to make paint prints
*use unpopped popcorn as "corn" counters
*glue corn onto large letter C
*provide each student with a workmat containing a grid with the appropriate
numbers. have them count out and glue the correct number of pieces of corn
onto the grid. (I usually have them practice doing this the first day without
gluing it on. Then the next day, they complete the activity on their own,
gluing it on)
*you could tie in any of the following books. i try to stay away from using
blends like "Clifford" when I'm introducing a letter, but I've listed them for
those who may want to use them:
*Casper ~ Laura Rossiter
*Casper the Kid ~ Jane Burton
*Clifford and the Grouchy Neighbors ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford the Big Red Dog ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford the Firehouse Dog ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford the Small Red Puppy ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford’s Christmas ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford’s Good Deeds ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford’s Pals ~ Norman Bridwell
*Clifford’s Word Book ` Norman Bridwell
*Comet’s Nine Lives ~ Jan Brett
*Corduroy ~ Don Freeman
*Cottonmouths ~ Sheri Bargar and Linda Johnson
*Counting Crocodiles ~ Judy Sierra
*Curious George ~ H.A.Rey
*Curious George Gets a Medal ~ H.A. Rey
*Curious George Goes to School ~ H.A.Rey
*Curious George Takes a Job ~ H.A.Rey
*Curious George Gets a Medal ~ H.A.Rey
*Curious George Rides a Bike ~ H.A.Rey
*Who’s Counting? ~ Nancy Tafuri
*If You Give a Mouse a Cookie ~
*graph the favorite cookies of the students in the class. the next day, serve
the top three favorites for snacks
*read Caps for Sale
*go to this site for Caps for Sale activities:
http://www.galstar.com/~davii/jilllink.html
*go to this site for more Caps for Sale activities:
Grade 1 TeacherViews

Cindy/SPED K-2
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
This next school year I am going to start out with Clifford. I have made a
number match game using Clifford's shape and of course on red paper. I will
put a number, zero through ten on some and then dots to match on the other
part.

I make a Clifford for one of my first art projects. Kids color a small
paper plate red, color and cut out predrawn ears, glue on ears and
wiggly eyes, and draw nose and mouth. Very easy and they turn out cute.

We also read Clifford stories and discuss how Clifford means well but
gets into alot of trouble. We talk about how that can happen to kids too
and what to do about it, how to solve problems we may cause.
Vickie
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I picked up this song on a poster a long time ago but I used to use it at
the beginning of the school year to help explain rules. I also had a
Clifford puppe tthat I used with it. Here it goes.Me..me..me!
Clifford the B-I-G red dog is here
To say
Do you H-E-L-P someone everyday
Do you cover a sneeze say thank you and please
Do you wait your turn in line
It's always nice to be polite
Hooray your doing
Hooray your doing
Hooray your doing fine!
If you need the notes let me know and I will pick it out on the piano
Pat
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
When our 3yr olds do Clifford, we usually read the Clifford stories, I hang
bone shapes around the doorway with the children's names on them, we hide dog
biscuits in the bean table for the children to find and count, we cut bone
shapes from bread for snacks, I have a cut out of a large red Clifford that
greets the children at the doorway, I cut dog shapes from oaktag and the
children paqint them red at the easel then decorate paper collars and attach
bone shapes with Clifford written on them. I think that's it...
Greer/3yrolds/NC
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^
We focus on the color red. We put the large
size dog biscuits in the bean or macaroni buckets and the children search
for and count them. We use dog bone cookie cutters with the playdough (old
ones) and also cut out bread with bone shaped cutters. 'Can't think of
anything else at the moment.
Greer/3yrolds/NC
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^
From: Oilbo1

regarding Clifford activity. Early in the school year, when we are learing
the colors, I use Clifford books for red. Since it's so early in the year, I
go for the simplest activity: coloring. I draw a Clifford on 9x12 manilla
paper using a broad tipped black marker. The children color the dog, and the
tail that is on the same piece of paper but not attached. They then cut both
pieces out. Then I put them together with a paper fasten so that the child
can help the dog wag his tail. The children seem to love it! I'm eager to
see what activities other people have to offer.
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Clifford:

Take red paper and cut it in a square. Then lay it like a diamond on the
table. Take the top point and bring it to bottom point. Then fold the two
side points down for ears and you have an origami type clifford.

make cliffords out of dog bones...glue wiggly eyes and a red pom pom or black
for nose. Ears are red felt and long and droopy (as I remember).

pe you get a good laugh from this.
Joyce
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* I LOVE COLORS

CHORUS:
I love colors, yes I do!
Red and orange and green and blue!
I love colors, dark or bright,
Yellow, purple, black, and white!

What is red? Juicy Beets!
What is brown? Chocolate treats!
What is white? A shiny moon!
What is gray? A big baboon

CHORUS

What is orange? Carrot sticks!
What is yellow? Baby chicks!
What is gold? Bright goldfish!
What is black? Licorice!

CHORUS

What is green? Grass so high!
What is blue? The open sky!
What is purple? Eggplant shells!
What is silver? Silver bells!

CHORUS

You could change the words to this song to incorporate your fall
produce theme.


*If your clothes Have any Red
Sung to: If You're Happy and You Know It

If your clothes have any red, any red
If your clothes have any red, and red
If your clothes have any red, put your finger on your head,
If your clothes have any red, any red

If your clothes have any blue, any blue
If your clothes have any blue, any blue
If your clothes have any blue, put your finger on your head,
If your clothes have any blue, any blue
Additional verses: If your clothes have any green, wave your hand so you are
seen.

If your clothes have any yellow, smile like a happy fellow, If your clothes
have any brown, turn your smile into a frown, If your clothes have any black,
put your hands behind your back.

*I LOVE COLORS
CHORUS:
I love colors, yes I do!
Red and orange and green and blue!
I love colors, dark or bright,
Yellow, purple, black, and white!


What is red? Juicy Beets!
What is brown? Chocolate treats!
What is white? A shiny moon!
What is gray? A big baboon

CHORUS

What is orange? Carrot sticks!
What is yellow? Baby chicks!
What is gold? Bright goldfish!
What is black? Licorice!

CHORUS

What is green? Grass so high!
What is blue? The open sky!
What is purple? Eggplant shells!
What is silver? Silver bells!

CHORUS

*COLORS AND COLORS
Sometimes I think of colors
one by one by one...
Pink for puffy evening clouds
Yellow for the sun.

I think of watermelon
for something that is green,
or an orange jack-o'-lantern
on the night of Halloween.

I think of purple eggplant,
and sky that's bright and blue,
or white for sneaker laces,
especially when they're new.

Sometimes I think of traffic lights
when they just turn to red,
or else I think how black it is
at night when I'm in bed.

I might think of an elephant
for something that is gray.
I like to think of colors
and have some fun that way.
poem by Vivian Couled


* Color Game
Cut colored construction paper in half--to give each child a half--making
sure each will have a partner to match. Go around in a circle singing
this song

Colors, colors all around
See them here and there
When the singing finally stops
Find a friend to share

As they are going around the circle you could have them either hold the
color behind their back or show it as they're walking. At the end of the
song, they find the color that would match theirs.

Extend this activity by then having the friends that match talk about
things that are that color, find something in the room that is that
color, etc.

Sheryl/k/MA
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Letter C continued:

*go to this site for Corduroy activity: http://v3.come.to/pop.asp
*Cowboys
*read The Cowboy and the Black Eyed Pea

Cindy/SPED K-2
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letter c we do favorite cookie graphs; children are to bring in a wrapper from
their favorite cookie package and we turn them into an environmental print
book. We also do colors, primary and secondary, eye droppers to drop food
colorin on coffee filters, favorite color graphs and cooperative groups to
write color poems - eg.red is __________.
Red is __________.
Red is __________.
We like red.
The children can illustrate each sentence.
Thanks for your work on this, Louise
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crayon resist names: have child write his name with white crayon on
white paper (press hard), cover paper with watercolor paint. Name will
'magically' appear

Cookie cookbook: children dictate recipe for favorite cookie,
illustrate, make into book (great for Mother's Day)

Cookie Monster Counting Game:
materials:
lunch bag
picture of Cookie Monster
wiggle eyes
Cookie Crisp cereal
cards programed with numerals 1-10 (or whatever you want)

procedure:
1. Draw or copy outline of Cookie Monster, cut out
2. Color, add wiggle eyes
3. Paste to lunch bag (side without bottom flap)
4. Turn numberal cards over on table
5. First player turns card over, reads numeral, counts out number of
"cookies" (cereal) to match numeral on card.
6. Feed cookies to Cookie Monster

Color words on cats, cows, or cookies

Read "Caps for Sale", "If you Give a Mouse a Cookie", "Corduroy"

Play "Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar"

Have a color week- where a different designated color each day

Make candles from painted toilet paper tubes, squares of colored tissue
paper for the flame

Coins: make patterns, sort, count, make crayon rubbings

From: bkramer@mediaone.net
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Cats
Caps for Sale
cowboys
A darling book, "Cookies Week"

Betty
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^
•Clouds.
We read the book "It looked like Spilt Milk". We go outside and look at the
clouds, and use our imaginations to "see" things. We do a science project
with steam to talk about how clouds are made. Then for art, we do "butterfly
prints", but call them cloud prints. We put a couple drops of white paint in
the center of blue paper, fold, and squeeze the paint around. Then we open
them up and write on them what each child thinks they look like. I am always
pleasantly suprised at how creative they are. The first time I did it I
thought they would just parrot what the older kids said, but it has never
happened.

•Sort Bottle Caps or Milk Caps

•Crayon Melting
Cover old heating or warming try with aluminum foil and heat up. Let children
lay their papers on the tray and draw with crayons. The wax melts and soaks
into the paper. Let wax dry. These are fun to hang in windows for a stained
glass effect.

•Make, Decorate and Eat “C” Shaped Cookies

•Big C Shape
Cut out big C shapes from construction paper or posterboard and paste on
cereal.
Cut out big C shapes from construction paper or posterboard and make a
collage.


•Cactus
Read the One Hundred Year Old Cactus - show the children a cactus plant. The
Christmas cactus is especially nice and blooms around December. Help the
children compare the cactus with other plants. Point out that since a cactus
needs less water than other plants, it canlive and grow in hot, dry areas.

•Calendar
Remind the children that calanders help us keep track of the days, weeks,
months of the year. Make a calendar for each month. Review the day of the
week and the date each day. Practice saying the days of the week from memory.

•Candle
Provide art supplies for children to make pretend candles. Use toilet-paper
tubes for the candle. Help the children paint the tubes with tempra. Show
them how to stuff red, orange and yellow tissue paper in the top of the tubes
for the flame then glue a strip of construction paper around the base for the
candle holders. Help them glue the tubes to small paper plates.

•Candy
Discuss why cake, candy, cupcakes and cookies should not be eaten often - help
them make a list of some foods that are heathier (carrots,cucumbers, etc)

•Candy Cane
Make a candy cane with pipe cleaners - use one white and one red - twist the
pipe cleaners to make a striped stem. Bend them into a candy cane shape.

•Cards
*Sort a deck of playing cards - sort them according to suits - then sequence

*Play card games such as "war", "Uno", "Old Maid", "fish". use the cards just
under 5 for the littler kids.

*Collect old Christmas cards - use them to make a Christmas Card alphabet
book.

•Carrot
Have several carrots on hand - clean and cook some of the carots - invite them
to taste raw and cooked carrots - ask how they are alike and different. Take
a survey - graph the results.

Give each child a carrot - show them how to draw a simple carrot. Help them
describe a real carrot using all of their senses. Cut real carrots into 2-3"
pieces - use them like a rubber stamp - dip in orange tempra - print to make a
letter C

Read the Carrot Seed - grow a carrot - choose a carrot that still has green
leaves and stems attached - cut the carrot 2" from the top - place in a
shallow bowl - place pebbles around the carrot then half fill with water - set
in a sunny window - new sprouts will appear in about a week. Once the carrot
has sprouted - plant it in some soil and enjoy watching it grow.

•Cars
Invite the children to cut out pictures of cars from old magazines -make a
collage.

Discuss why we have cars - what other types of vehicles are there?

Have the kids bring toy cars from home to share. Help them arrange the cars
in a letter C! Read Cars by Anne Rockwell.

Kids love to make car noises. Let them following you along a imaginary road
and pretend to be cars. Go fast and "zoom" go slowly, stop quickly and "eek"
as brakes work - go around lots of curves - putt-putt-putt with engine trouble
- etc...

•Cassette
Cut a large C and hang it over your cassette recorder - help them learn to use
it.

Tape the kids as a group or individually saying the ABC's counting and singing
songs. Replay the tape - let them guess who is who

Have the children bring a cassette tape from home to share

•Cat
Draw a simple cat shape on a large piece of paper - (if the kids are old
enough have them draw it) have the children paint their cats Black and cut
them out when the paint is dry. Have them add eyes and wiskers -

Read Cat in the Hat, Have You Seen My Cat?, Cats! Cats! Cats, Millions of
Cats, Calico Cat Looks at Colors. Let them draw pictures of their favorite
story book cat

Make paper doll cats -

Play Copycat - stand in front of the group and demonstrate a movement such as
shaking your arm, making a funny face, standing on one foot, etc. Challenge
the children to copy you - after you have acted out 4-5 movements invite the
children to take turns being the leader.

Place carbon paper between two pieces of paper -staple them together - have
them draw C's and cats then pull apart the carbon paper to reveal the copy
underneath.

•Catalog
Have an assortment of catalogs available. Let the children browse through and
cut out five favorite items - glue them on construction paper - C is for
Catalogs

•Clay
Encourage the children to play with clay - Make clay - let me know if you need
a recipe

Collect a variety of cookie cutters - use them as clay shapers - look for
large seasonal cutters and alphabet cutters too

•Clean
Emphasize putting toys away when finished playing - give out best cleaner
buttons to children who help

Set up a Cleaning Center - include a small broom, mop, dustpan, sponge, apron,
feather duster, vacuum, etc.... Demonstrate the proper use then encourage the
children to try

•Clock
make paper clocks on paper plates - Attach construction paper hands with
brads. Identify the big hand and little hand -if the children are old enough
use the clocks to tell the time and hour

Discuss why we have clocks - Play Rock around the Clock - Wee Sings Round the
Clock soung (explains the function of a clock)

•Cloth
Explain that cotton grows on plants. Cotton is made into thread, the thread
is woven into cloth and the cloth is sewn into clothing. Read From Cotton to
Pants - Cut cotton cloth into strips. Invite the children to fel the cloth
and decide whether warm or cold weather clothing shoud be made from cotton.

Use Cotton Balls to make a letter C

Read Corduroy books - let the children feel some cordury - discuss why the
bear might have been named Corduroy.

Discuss why we wear coats - cut pictures from magazines - - make a closet for
the coats by folding a piece of construction paper the long way - glue a small
construction paper circle on the closet for a doorknob and write "My Coat
Closet" glue the picures of the coats inside.

•Clouds
Read Hi Clouds - use tempra to make large gray or white clouds on blue paper -
to give the clouds texture glue cotton to some of them.

Fold a sheet of paper in half - drop a large dab of white tempra along the
inside fold - have the children refold the paper - and smooth it with their
hands. Open the paper to reveal a cloud.

Read It Looked Like Spilt Milk - If possible, on a nice cloudy day take the
kids outside - and lie down on blankets and watch the clouds go by - discuss
the shapes.

•Clover
If Clover is in season have the children pick some - Cut a large Letter C -
glue the clovers on.

•Clown
Paint clown faces on all interested children. Take pictures of your cute
clowns

make a clown face out of a paper plate, const paper, and an inflated balloon.
Have them color a clown face - then punch a small hole in the center of the
face - help the kids pull the knot of the balloon through the hole and tape
the know in the back.

Read the Clown-Arounds and C Is for Clown - have the children draw their
favorite clowns

•Coal
Make coal or charcoal crystals. put coal or charcoal briquets in a tray - mix
together 2 TBS each - salt, water, bluing (avail in the laundry section ) pour
over coal or charcoal. Add drops of food coloring whever - coat each piece
with a few drops of ammonia - the next morning you should see crystals
beginning to form - if not repeat the process

Draw pictures with charcoal = spreat lots of newspapers

•Coconut
Demonstrate how to crack a coconut - cut the coconut into little chunks -
invite the children to sample the coconut and the coconut milk.

•Coins
Have an assortment of coins on hand - let the children help count the number
of coins - sort them into stacks - discuss how they are alike and different

Have the children place coins under typing paper - rub the side of a crayon
over the place where the coin is under the paper -

Give each child a penny, a nickel, a dime and a quarter - hold up one coin -
have the children hold up a matching coin

Put one coin inside a feely bag - invite the children to reach inside and see
if they can guess which coin it is.

•Cold
Glue pictures of hot and cold foods on index cards - help the children sort
the pictures into hot and cold categrories

•Colors
Read Colors, Is It Red? Is It Yellow? Is It Blue?. Cut a large letter C
from const. paper - let the kids use water colors to paint the C different
colors.

Hold up objects and ask the children to name the color.

Play "I Spy"

Sort colored blocks, buttons, jar lids, etc... by color

Write color words on flash cards for older children - practice reading the
words aloud

Set up a Coloring Center - place crayons, coloring books, drawing paper,
tracing paper, markers, colored pencils, etc...

Make color caterpillars - give the children construction paper circles - one
for each of the eight basic colors - tape one circle to a classroom wall. Add
eyes and antenna to make the caterpillars head.

•Comics
Have the children share their favorite comic strips.

Save the Sunday comics and daily comics - cut the comic strips into separate
frames, cut out a large construction paper C - glue comic frames on the letter
C - if they are old enough have them sequence them

•Computer
Teach them a computer game - Try Jump Start for Toddlers - or My Very First
Software - All of the Disney Animated Story Books are good - Magic School Bus
is good too!

•Cookies
Make Chocolate Chip Cookies with the kids - a triple C word

•Corn
Read Corn Is Maize: The Gift of the Indians - make cornbread

Cut out 2 Letter C's - spread w/glue - sprinkle one with cornmean and the
other with popcorn kernels.

Make Corn on the Cob - have the children list other foods that are yellow

•Counting
Teach the kids a counting song - One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, Ten Little Fingers,
5 Little Monkeys, etc.....

Read Anno's Counting Book - One, Two, Three - One Was Johnny: A Counting Book,
etc... Have the children count anything you have on hand

•Crawl
Sponsor crawling relays. Draw two large letter C's on the floor w/chalk or
tape - have the chlidren crawl along the C.

have the kids make C shapes with their bodies.

•Cream
Invite the children to fingerpaint with shaving cream - have them write some
Letter C's in the cream

•Cucumbers

•C is for cookie
Just this week we were singing C is for cookie and made up a bunch of verses c
is for cake, carrots, celery, cabbage, cauliflower, and as many things they
can think of. It is so easy to sing.
C is for Cookie, thats good enough for me, C is for cookie, thats good enough
for me, C is for cookie, thats good enough for me. Cookie, Cookie, cookie.
Cookie starts with C!

•Cutting
Let the children practice free cutting - start with snipping -give them strips
of paper - (make sure the width is only about 2/3 the width of the scissor
blade) have the children snip - the strip - glue the pieces on a letter C to
make a masaic

Show the children how to cut fringe.

•Castles
Use PT and TP rolls to make a castle - cut slits in the tops to attach to
other rolls to make varying heights - use imagination! Paint the tubes
goldish and use sponge squares in red paint to make it look like a stone
castle.

•Clown Bank
Tape a round piece of cardboard to each end of the PT tube. Cut a slot for
the clowns mouth. (make it big enough for coins to fit through). Paint the
tube white. Glue yarn hair and clown features cut from paper.

•Curly Caterpillars
Have the children glue colored paper strips (aprox 1 1/2 X 8 inch) into rings.
Glue six or seven rings together to form a long caterpillar. The children can
draw faces and use pipe cleaners as antennae.

•Calico Cats
Supply fabric or wallpaper scraps for cutting out the head and body of the
cat. Have the children add features with markers and/or crayons. Have each
child tell something about their Cat. Write out what the children say in their
own words, then have them find and circle the Cs in their recitations.

•Cave
Make a cave in one corner of the play area by draping sheets or blankets over
some tables. Let the children pretend to be caterpillars crawling in and out
of the cave. Ask them to make the hard sound of C as they crawl around.

•Catch It!
Cut off the tops of plastic milk jugs with handles to use as receptacles for
catching balls and beanbags that the children can "toss" to each other. Remind
the children to be cautious when doing this activity.


•Crazy Caterpillar Critters
Provide a variety of vegetables that begin with the letter C, such as celery,
carrots, cucumbers, cabbage and cauliflower. Cut these into small pieces and
rounds. Have them assemble a caterpillar in the shape of a C by sticking the
vegetables together with peanut butter or cream cheese. Give each child a
piece of cabbage to be the "grass" under the crazy critter.


•Cc Foods To Try
Cabbage, cake, cantaloupe, carrot juice, carrots, carrot salad, cashews,
casserole, catfish, catsup, cauliflower, clamato juice, clams, cobbler, cocoa,
coconut, cold cuts, cole slaw, collard greens, consomme', cookies, corn bread,
corned beef, corn dogs, corn muiffins, corn-on-the-cob, cottage cheese, crab,
crab apples, crackers, cranberries, cream, cream cheese, creamed corn, crepes,
cucumbers, cupcakes, curry, custard


•Chicken Pox Pancakes:
Strawberries
Pancake mix
Bananas
Powdered sugar

Chop the berries into small chunks, allowing one or two per pancake face.
Set aside.

Prepare the pancake mix according to package directions. When the pancakes
are done, place each serving in a stack on a separate plate.

For every two stacks of pancakes, you need to peel one banana. Carefully
slice off the two ends and put one on top of each stack for a nose. Then
cut two thin slices from each end for eyes. Then cut banana in half for a
long curved mouth.

Arrange the strawberry chunks chicken pox all around each face. Drop a
pinch of powdered sugar on each pox for a tasty bit of puss. Serves as many
little polka dotted people as your heart desires.

•Cookies
Make a cookie game. Cut out a round circle from brown const. paper. Using a
paper punch, make some darker "chocolate chips". Things to do with this:
~Let them count out the chips and glue them on the "cookie".
~Arrange the "chips"(in shapes, as a face, by groups, etc.) before gluing on.
~Make larger "chips" and put numbers on them. Have them glue in order.
With the larger "chips", put the letters of their name, see if they can
arrange properly, then glue.

•The Biggest Cookie In The World (written by Linda Hayward, ill. by Joe
Ewers) is a simple Sesame Street book which kids love to "read" (they can
memorize it very quickly).

•.Chocolate Chip Cookies (written by Karen Wagner, ill. by Leah Palmer
Preiss) is simple instructions for making them.

•.If You Give A Mouse A Cookie (written by Laura Joffe Numeroff, ill. by
Felicia Bond) is a great book for sequencing activities; have the kids help
tell the story with small props to represent all the parts of the story
[Lakeshore also has a storytelling apron kit for this story, there is a
CD-ROM available, and an adorable cassette with activity songs].

•Alligator Cookies (James Young) is a rhyming book which can be read with
older (4 and 5) children; it includes a recipe for no-cook green cornflake and
peanut butter cookies.

•The Doorbell Rang (Pat Hutchins) is a wonderful math and sharing story;
Make reproductions of the people in the story which can be used on a
chalkboard [could also be flannel/velcro] with magnetic cookies--the
children love retelling story and playing with the manipulatives.

•"Who Stole The Cookie?"-traditional game---if anyone needs the words, I
think I have them.

•"Cookies in the Bakery Shop"-one child is baker, others are either cookies
or customers; baker counts cookies and we say: "[number] little cookies in
the bakery shop, All prettied up with sugar on top, Along came [child's name]
with a penny to spend, She [or he] bought a cookie and away they went" this
is repeated as each customer buys a cookie until there are none left and then
we pick a new baker (my students insist on doing this several times!)

• 8.class graph-"Which of these cookies do you like best?" Have a few to
sample, trying to represent different cultures in my daycare.

•dramatic play and playdough-both house area and playdough table are
stocked with cookie sheets, rolling pins, etc.

•Also, for craft stuff, you could have the kids cut out a cookie shape and
have different "ingredients" to glue on them-like, chocolate chips, nuts,
pieces of hard candy, cheerios or fruit loops.

Activity C
Counting coins is always fun. Get a small handful of mixed coins; pennies,
nickels, dimes, and quarters. On a sheet of paper make a rubbing of each
type of coin across the bottom of the page. Then, pick a coin from the pile.
Decide which coin it is like. Then trace around that coin making a column of
the same types of coins. Do this for all the coins. When you are done you
will have a graph showing how many of each kind of coin was in your original
handful. Next, you can examine the results of your work. How many of each
kind of coin did you have? Which kind did you have the most of, and which
the least? Did you have the same of any two kinds? How many more of one did
you have compared to another? How many fewer of one another?

C: clap 2-3-4-5-6-7-8. Try chanting numbers while waiting in line, have
the children mimic your pattern.