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Subject: other

#1301. Locating and Counting Pulses

, level: Middle
Posted Wed Sep 15 10:50:07 PDT 1999 by nannette scheuch (nannette04@aol.com).
Scranton Schoold District, Scranton,PA
Materials Required: stop watch or watch with second hand, students worksheets
Activity Time: 40-45 minutes
Concepts Taught: factors affecting resting heart rate/pulse taking

Objectives:

v Students will be able to properly take their pulse.
v Students will learn the 22 pulse points on their body.
v Students will use their carotid pulse to calculate their resting heart rate per minute.
v Students will recognize how activity and body position affect resting heart rate.
v Students will recognize how size affects resting heart rate.

Materials:

v Student work sheet
v Stop watch or watch with a second hand


Backround Information:

1. A pulse is where you are able to feel an artery expand with each
beat of the heart.


2. Instruct students to take pulse using their index, middle, and ring
fingers of either hand. . ..NOT THEIR THUMB! The thumb has a
pulsation of its own that might make counting pulses confusing.

Practice this procedure (using the carotid pulse) with the students
before they begin the lab.

The carotid pulse is found on the neck next to the vocal cords.


3. Explain that the body is symmetrical and where a pulse can be
found on one side of the body, a pulse can be found on the
opposite side as well.

4. Define resting heart rate (R.H.R.) as one's pulse while at rest as
opposed to standing or moving.

Procedures:

1. Take a few minutes and find as many pulse points on the body as
you can. HINT: There are 11 on each side of the body with 2 on
the face, 1 on the neck, 1 in the area of the chest (not directly over
your heart!), 3 on each arm, 3 on each leg, and 1 on the foot.

List them on the lines provided. (be as specific as you can as to
where you found them.)

Face: ________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Neck: ________________________________________________
Chest: ________________________________________________
Arms: ________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Legs: ________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
_________________________________________________
Foot: _________________________________________________

2. Which of these pulses is the strongest? Why?
3. Take your carotid pulse for 15 seconds using your index,
middle, and ring fingers.. Multiply the number by 4 to get
your pulse per minute. Record your answer on the line.

___________________ beats per minute


4. Take your carotid pulse again, and count it for a full minute.
Record your pulse per minute on the line provided.

____________________ beats per minute

5. Why do you suppose the two numbers (in #3 and #4) may or may not be the same?

6. Stand up for 3 minutes. Find your carotid pulse, and take your
pulse for 15 seconds again. Multiply the number by 4 to calculate
your pulse per minute. Record your answer on the line provided.

________________________ pulse per minute


7. As you stand, raise your arms above your head, and hold them
there for a minute. Find your carotid pulse with one hand and take
your pulse for 15 seconds. Again, calculate your pulse per minute,
and record it on the line provided.

________________________ pulse per minute


8. Jog briskly in place for two minutes (jumping jacks can be
substituted). Immediately after the activity, take your carotid pulse
for 15 seconds and calculate your pulse per minute. Record your
answer on the line provided.

________________________ pulse per minute

9. What happened to your pulse when you stood up?


What happened to your pulse when you raised your hands above your head?


What happened to your pulse when you jogged briskly?


10. What do you think would happen to your pulse if you were to lie
down for 5 minutes?


11. Why do you think your pulse changes depending on whether
you lying down, sitting, standing, or exercising?

12. Compare your resting heart rate with that of others in the class.
How does the size of the student affect how fast the heart
beats?


13. Rank the following animals in order from the fastest beating heart
rates to the slowest.: elephant, bird, dog, horse, rabbit

fastest:: ___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
slowest::___________________________

URL: http://library.advanced.org/10348/experiments/index_experiments.html

Summary:

Make conclusions based on the results of your findings.

1. Which pulse, because it is large and close to the heart, is one of
the strongest pulse points on the body?


2. Why do you suppose your heart speeds up when you stand up?

When you exercise?


3. What is the relationship between body size and resting heart
rate?

Lead-Up Activity to the Next Lesson:

As you finish your lab, go to the following URL site, and begin reading about the anatomy of the heart and the direction the blood takes as it flows through the heart.


URL: http://onhealth.com/ch1/condctr/cardio/item,33043.asp