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Mathematics
Grade: Elementary
Subject: Mathematics

#1318. Math lessons to meet Ca. Standards- Kindergarten

Mathematics, level: Elementary
Posted Sat Sep 25 17:24:34 PDT 1999 by Elaine Magud (magud@inreach.com).
Joshua Cowell School, Manteca, CA
Materials Required: see lessons
Concepts Taught: see lesson

ALGEBRA AND FUNCTIONS

1.0 Students sort and classify objects.

SHOE SORTING
Objective: to sort shoes by attributes.
Materials: two jump ropes or hula hoops.
Procedure: gather children into a circle. Ask them to take off one shoe and hold it in their laps. Discuss with the children the ways you can sort shoes (color, size, type, laces, buckles, etc.) Place the jumpropes in the middle and make two circles.( or use hula hoops). Indicate which circle will hold those shoes that belong and the which will hold those that do not. Choose the attribute you are going to sort for and have the children place their shoes in the proper circle. Discuss the sort and how you might do it again. Gather the shoes and sort for another attribute.

KID SORTING
Objective: sorting students by attributes.
Materials: students and a jump rope
Procedure: Place students in a circle. Make a circle from the rope on the floor in the middle of the circle. Discuss attributes and sort - those with a particular attribute to the middle. Those that don't belong are left on the outside of the circle. Regroup and resort several times.

TREASURE SORTING

Objective: sorting objects by one or more attributes.
Materials: sorting trays ( muffin pans, divided plastic containers, egg cartons, anything with compartments to hold manipulatives), objects with assorted attributes ( color, size, etc.)
Procedure: the student takes a handful of manipulatives and sorts according to an attribute. Ask the student to explain how and why they sorted the way they did. Ask the student to sort in a different way. For an extension the student sorts and then asks another student to guess how they sorted.MATHEMATICAL REASONING

1.0 Students make decisions about how to set up a problem:
2.0 Students solve problems in reasonable ways and justify their reasoning:

WORD PROBLEMS:
Materials: story mats, manipulatives.
Procedures: Teacher tells students a simple number story. Together the teacher and students decide how to use the manipulatives to tell the story. This is practiced several times. The teacher tells another simple story and asks the student to use the manipulatives to represent the problem.
Extension: listening center has a variety of tapes with recorded number stories. Students are provided with story mats and manipulatives to use to decide what strategies they will use to represent the story.
Extension: Teacher tells students a number story using manipulatives. The teacher re-tells the story and sketches on paper in place of using the manipulatives. After doing this several times the teacher asks the students to sketch their story.
MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY

1.0 Students understand the concept of time and units to measure it: they understand that objects have properties, such as length, weight, and capacity, and that comparisons may be made using these properties:

BALANCE SCALES CENTER
Objectives: to compare weights of objects.
Materials: balance scales, margarine tubs or similar containers fill with different amounts of rice (seal the containers and draw a symbol or shape on the top of each one). Small objects to weigh and compare.
Procedure: place the materials in a center. Discuss with the students how they should treat the balance scales and the materials. Let the students explore with the materials.
After everyone has had the opportunity to explore discuss what they learned at the center. For example: how do you know which object weighs more, weighs less, weighs the same. Did something surprise you? Next prepare a recording sheet for the students. Draw a balance scale on the paper - ask the student to draw or record one of their explorations. Share with the group.

MEASUREMENT - NON-STANDARD
Objective: comparing the length, width, or height of an object.
Materials: Objects found in the classroom, unifix cubes, linking cubes, inch-worms etc.
Procedure: Give the students different objects to measure with non-standard measuring tools - unifix cubes etc. Discuss the differences using the vocabulary: longer, shorter, taller, etc. Do this several times with your students. For an extension make a recording sheet for your students so that they can share what they find with the class.

TIME
Calendar Time: most of Calendar time takes care of Days, Months, date, etc. Learning these concepts through music, movement, and literature are most appropriate for Kindergarten.

Fun Song to Share:
Days of the Week (tune: The Addams Family)
There's Sunday and there's Monday,
There's Tuesday and there's Wednesday,
There's Thursday and there's Friday,
And then there's Saturday!

Days of the Week (snap, snap)
Days of the Week (snap, Snap)

Days of the Week,
Days of the Week.,
Days of the Week. (snap, snap)

MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY
2.0 Students identify common objects in their environment and describe
geometric features:

Shape Search:
Objective: finding common shapes in the environment.
Materials: common objects in the room.
Procedures: gather children on the rug. Discuss common geometric shapes. Ask a student to find a square in the room, ask another to find a circle etc.
Go on a shape walk. Go outside to the playground and look for shapes.
Discuss what you found. Encourage students to record what they found.

Guess the Shape:
Objective: identify common shapes (tactile)
Materials: "Feely box", chart paper, markers, attribute blocks, poster board shapes, or three dimensional shapes. Making a Feely Box or Discovery Can is very simple. Clean out an aluminum can - be sure and remove any 'tags" left over from removal of the lid ( there are can openers out now that leave no sharp edges). Take an old sock and cut off the cuff. Glue the cuff to the lid of the container using Tacky glue or another strong glue.
Procedure: Place a 3 dimensional object in the can. Place your hand in the can ( to alleviate any fears) and tell the children that there is a shape in the can and you need help deciding what it is. Give the can to each student. Talk about how it feels, how many sides, is it warm or cold, smooth or bumpy etc.? List the comments on the chart paper. For an extension this can go into a center and be used by partners.

ART EXTENSIONS:

NURSERY RHYMES: Shape Sheep - Mary Had a Little Lamb
Materials: poster board cut into common shapes, cotton balls, glue, chenille stems, clip art picture of lambs head (or make one using a triangle as the basic shape.)
Procedure: children chose a shape, staple the legs ( stems) and then glue on the cotton balls, add the lambs head.

SHAPE BOOK:
Materials: 9X12 white construction paper, common shapes cut out of several colors of construction paper, glue, crayons.
Procedure: student chooses a shape and glues it to the paper. Using crayons student draws and colors a picture including their shape. ake a class book.


NUMBER SENSE ACTIVITIES
1.0 Students understand the relationship between numbers and quantities.
NUMBER-COLOR DICE
Objective- number and color recognition
Materials:
Any color page or blown up clip art to go with theme
Wooden Cube
color stickers
Crayons or colored pencils
Procedure: decide what colors and numbers you want to practice.
Code the picture with the numbers.(e.g., a picture of a red apple can be coded: 1 is red, 2 is green). Place red and green round stickers on the cube and then code them by writing the number 1 on the red sticker and 2 on green.)
How to Play: The student rolls the dice and then matches the number and color on the dice to a numbered section on the picture. The student then colors that section according to the dice. (e.g., the dice shows 1.red - the student finds a section marked number 1 and colors it read.)

CALENDAR ACTIVITY
Objective: matching numbers and quantities.
Have students count out objects to match days in school or days of the month.


BEACH BALL BINGO!
Objective: number recognition
Materials: a beach ball and a permanent marker.
Procedure: blow up the beach ball and with permanent marker write numerals on the surface.
How to Play: You can do this with a small group or whole class. One student tosses the ball to another. The catcher must call out the number that is located under a particular finger ( if you are teaching left and right you can designate the right or left thumb or hand).

NUMBER MATCH
Objective: one on one correspondence, , counting, recognition, and ordering.
Materials: programmed number cards - numerals on one side of the card - spots or stickers on the other to correspond with numerals. Small objects to manipulate and count. Plastic clear drinking cups or portion cups ( in the spring you can get small plastic baskets). Place a sticker or write with a marker the numeral or numerals you want to practice on each cup. Place everything in a container.
How to play the game: 1. Student places the numbered cups in sequence (for self-checking include a number strip in your container). 2. Student draws a number card and finds the matching counting cup. 3. Student places the appropriate number of manipulatives in each cup. My students love to work with a partner on this task.

Some suggestions for manipulatives to go with themes: Pigs ( for farm unit, airplanes or cars (transportation), frogs or fish (pond), small plastic eggs or fruit ( use little baskets for Spring or nutrition ),bears ( extension for Teddy Bears or Brown Bear, Brown Bear), beans or seeds ( plants and Spring), large jewels ( use small black pots for St. Patrick's Day), let your imagination be your guide!


NUMBER SENSE ACTIVITIES
2.0 Students understand and describe simple additions and subtractions:


ADDITION MATS
Objective: Students learn that a constant number of objects can be manipulated and still contain the same amount. Students learn how addition works.
Materials: For each mat you will need 9x12 construction paper and 3 paper circles ( small enough to fit across the paper), glue, a permanent marker, manipulatives, and dry erase markers.
Procedure: glue the circles in a row across the 12 inch. portion of the paper. Between the first two circles draw in a plus sign. After the 2nd circle draw in an equal sign. Underneath each circle make line for recording numerals.
Laminate each sheet.
Game: 1. Introduce the mats to your students and show them how they can use them. Start with a small number of manipulatives and have students place them in the first two circles. (e.g., give the students 5 bear counters. Students can place the counters in any they choose in the first two circles. My student places 2 in the first circle and 3 in the second). Then count the number of manipulatives in each circle. Next recite 2 plus 3 equals and have the student sweep all of the counters into the last circle. Count the manipulatives in the last circle and repeat - 2 plus 3 equals 5. Then do it again.
2. Children can work in partners using the same number of manipulatives, but arranging them differently each turn.
3. The next step is to use the dry erase marker and add numbers to the equation.
4. Lastly you can give them a piece of paper with 3 circles and they can record their turns by drawing the manipulatives, adding the numbers and make a book.

WHAT'S LEFT?

Objective: students manipulate objects to understand simple subtraction.
Materials: a set number of manipulatives and two small bowls or containers.
How to play the game: children work in pairs and take turns. Place a set amount of manipulatives in one bowl. The first student takes out some of the manipulatives and places them on the table and covers them with the second container while the second student turns around. The first student says to the other child," I had 5 bears and I took out 3. What's left? The second student gives the answer. The first student takes the cover off the manipulatives and they check the answer. Each child takes turns covering and turning around.


3.0 Students use estimation strategies in computation and problem solving that involve numbers that use the ones and tens places.

Estimation jar:

Every week our Star of the Week brings in something for our estimation jar. We want it to be a secret so they are cautioned not to tell anyone what is in the jar. At the beginning of the year I ask for 25 to 50 objects. In January I ask for 50 to 100 objects. We guess and check counting by 1's, 2's. 5's or 10's. Everyones estimate is written on the white board and we have a conversation about what is a good estimate, do you think we have more than 10, 20 etc.?

Pumpkins - estimate and then count the seeds.
Watermelon - estimate and count the seeds.

GUESS-TIMATION GAME

Objective: recognizing a reasonable estimation.
Materials: several small jars that are the same size, manipulatives or objects of various sizes.
Procedure: Large or small group. Place a large object in a jar. Ask the children how many are in the jar. Take out the object, count it, and then put it back in the jar. Hold up another jar of the same size. Ask the students how many ( marbles, bears, etc.) do they think will fit in the jar. Record their estimates and start counting the objects as you place them in the jar. Stop about half way and ask if they want to change their estimate. Record the changes. Continue counting objects into the jar. Ask students if their guess was more or less than the final count. Repeat this lesson using different objects. Later you can have the students record their own guess. Kindergartners might not feel comfortable with the "wrong" guess and may need to be reminded that an estimate is not an accurate, but a close count.
STATISTICS, DATA ANALYSIS, and
PROBABILITY

1.0 Students collect information about objects and events in their environment:

Ideas from my internet friends on Venn diagrams:

It was always hard to find ideas for Venn diagrams in the kindergarten, but
I came up with a couple I really liked.
1. Using two jump ropes to make the Venn, we would do a shoe survey of the
class.
One loop would be ties, the other Velcro, the middle both and the outside
for sandals, slipons, what have you's.

2. A dog and cat survey.
On a big piece of butcher paper, I would draw a big cat with a round body next to a big dog with a round body that over lapped, This would form the diagram. The kids would sign their name in the proper area to indicate whether they had a cat, dog or both. Others on the outside.
Richard

We did venn diagrams with our fifth grade buddies using a fifth grader
paired with a k-1 student. They used their first names and put the
letters they had in common in the center and the ones different in their
own circle. We made a class book of the Venn's.

I have used the Venn diagram to compare the story "The mitten". One by Jan
Brett and the other by a different author. It was great to contrast some of the differences in the stories.
The program ,Inspiration, has a Venn diagram type graphic organizer that is
awesome!!!!! It is an amazing program that can be adapted for anything!!!!
Donna McArdle
Venn's can be used with the pictures of animals.......that were in two
different versions of the Mitten story.

You can also have your students make Venn's using Kid Pix.

Judi in Ohio Venn's can also be used to compare two students. We do this early in the
school year...when we are getting to know each other......it's a great intro to the same and different.
Judi in Ohio
I use Venn diagrams for what we call Question of the Day. I start with one
circle and a yes/no question (i.e., I have a dog) on the board. I have
magnets with each of the kids' names on them and they answer the question
(name inside or outside the circle) at some point during the day. We discuss
the results during our second circle. Later in the year I add another circle
that is completely separate (no intersection), then work our way to the 2
intersecting circles (i.e., I have a brother and I have a sister). They not
only like answering the questions, they love helping me come up with
questions.
Ellen
The I Spy books and CD-ROM use venn Diagrams. :-)

Sandy/K/MO
I use Venn Diagrams with kinders.... beginning with attribute blocks. I put
2 Venn hoops with an intersection and make no mention of the center
area...then pass out several attribute blocks...and we select 2 attributes for
sorting: for example, yellow and triangle...everything that fits neither
attribute goes outside the hoops. When a child has a block that fits both
attributes, he/she will often realize that it belongs in the intersection.

After doing this several days with different attributes, I then begin to use
the children's pictures for a Venn sorting . I make a Venn diagram on
construction paper and have 2 categories for sorting: for example, "I have
brown eyes" and "I am 6 years old." They glue their pictures in the
appropriate section of the diagram. And we always discuss the results... I
ask questions such as "Why is Joey in the center? " Why is Amy outside the
hoops?" etc.

Hope this helps.

I use the Venn to compare different versions of the same folktale, ie. The
Gingerbread Boy.

During dinos, we had the children pick 2 plastic dinos and then do a venn on
them. The children drew their circles and then wrote or drew their observations
about the dinos in the appropriate space. Realize it is important to have used
the Venn in whole group time a few times before doing independent work with it.
The kids did a great job with this.

Hula-hoops are great to use when doing group Venn's with manipulatives. Shoes
can be Venned (not sure this is a word but it works), also coats, and backpacks

Just thought, we are doing insects --- might buy some of those super sized ones
at Wal-Mart and have the kids Venn them.


I have used a venn diagram with my class with letters in their
names--for instance a, e (a&e) and outside no a or e

Jennifer
Venn diagrams are great. I use them in my kindergarten classroom all the
time.
Some ideas I have are:
****comparing two books with the same title
****comparing book character to each other
****comparing book characters to the children in the class
****compare different cities
****compare different books on the same subject
and the list goes on.
Hope this helps
Kandi


GRAPHING IDEAS FROM MY INTERNET FRIENDS:


Do you believe in leprachauns?
Will it rain today?
Is today's date an odd number?
Is today's date an even number?
Are you excited about being at school today?

Is 2+2 a double fact?
Is 6+3 a ten's fact?
Does the attached clock say 4:00?
Do the coins here add up to 22 cents?

1. Is all the snow gone at your house?
2. Do you have a cat?
3. Do you have a dog?
4. Do you have any brothers?
5. Do you have any sisters?
6. Have you lived in any other state?
7. Were you born in the state you are living in now?
8. Do you like the cafeteria food?
9. Have you even made cookies with your mom?
10. Have you ever seen a rainbow?
11. Can you ride a two wheel bike?
12. Can you do a flip?
13. Do you take gymnastics or karate?
14. Does your mom work outside the house?
15. Does your grandma or grandpa live in the same town as you?
16. Do you think you will graduate from Bremen School?
17. Did your parents go to school in Bremen?
18. Do you like the color black?
19. Is your glue bottle full?
20. Is 3+4+5= 13 correct?
21. Did you ever see a leprechaun?
22. Are you going away during spring vacation?
23. Can you jump off the diving board at school?
24. Do you like oatmeal?
25. Do you walk to school?
26. Did you go to the library this week?
27. Do you have a computer at home?
28. Have you seen A Bug's Life?
29. Do you ride a bus to school?
30. Do you like to bring your lunch to school?

Would you kiss a frog? (Frog and Toad theme) tell why or why not
Did you sleep well last night?
Do You Brush and Floss? (Brush Only, Brush and Floss)
Do you have a cat, a dog, or other animal?
Do you have a four-legged or two-legged pet?
Do you have a pet or no pet?
Do you have your own bedroom?
Do you like baths or showers?
Do you like to play inside or outside on a rainy day? (Inside,
outside)
Do you like Watermelon?
Do you read every day?
Do you think _______ will sink or float? (Science)
Have you ever been on a plane?
Are you wearing ______ today? (substitute any colour)
Did you brush your teeth this morning?
Did you eat a healthy breakfast?
Do you enjoy . .
Do you have . .
Do you have a pet?
Do you have a sister or brother?
Do you like . .
Have you been to . .
Have You Ever been to the Beach?
Does your jacket have a hood?
Have You Ever Gone Fishing?
Will we have 6 more weeks of winter?


Will a paperclip float or sink in water?

Float Sink
Is February a winter month?

How many days have we been in school?

87 99 100

Which number is greater?

45 47

Which number is less?

32 22
How many pennies make $1.00?

10 100

How many dimes make $1.00?
10 5


How many quarters make $1.00?

4 5 10
How many vowels are in the word VALENTINE?

5 4
What number is missing?
0,1,2,__, 4

3 6

What number is missing?
0,2,4,__,8

6 9

What number is missing?
5,4,__, 2, 1

3 0

Seasonal
Is January is a winter month?

Is July a winter month?

Is May a Spring month?

Is October a Fall month?


At Christmas
Do you believe in Santa?
Do you have a real or artificial tree?
Do you have a wreath on your door?
Do you have Christmas lights out side your house?
Have you hung up a stocking?

At New Years
Did you make a resolution for the New Year?

On Saint Patrick's Day
Are you wearing green today?

At Thanksgiving
Do you eat dinner at home or away?
Do you have turkey for thanksgiving?
List some pies --children put their name under the Favorite one.

Halloween
Favorite Halloween costumes
Types of Halloween candy received

After a while ask kids to come up with the subjects for the graphs.


GETTING TO KNOW YOUR STUDENTS GRAPH QUESTIONS

1. Are you nine years old?
2. How many brothers do you have?
3. Do you have a pet?
4. Were you named after someone special?
5. Do you have a middle name?
6. Do you like to watch sports?
7. Do you like to wear purple?
8. Can you speak another language besides English?
9. How many sisters do you have?
10. Do you have any brothers or sisters in this school?
11. How many pencils are in your desk?
12. Did you wash your hair last night?
13. Have you ever ridden in an airplane?
14. Do you think your shoe weighs more than your math book?
15. How many syllables are in your first name?
16. Did you have milk at breakfast?
17. Do you have a public library card?
18. Have you ever been fishing?
19. Have you ever taken dance lessons?
20. Do you like broccoli?
21. Have you lost any of your canine teeth?
22. Do you have any brothers or sisters in preschool?
23. Have you ever been to Walt Disney World?
24. Do you know what you want to be when you grow up?
25. What is your favorite school day?
26. Do you have a cowboy hat?
27. Who has hair longer than their shoulders?
28. Were you awake at 6:30 this morning?
29. Do you like macaroni and cheese?
30. Are your eyes brown?
31. Do you know what day of the week you were born on?
32. How many books are in your desk?
33. Is Valentine's Day your favorite holiday?
34. Do you think 30 pennies will cover a dollar completely?
35. Does it take longer than 30 minutes for you to get to school?
36. Do you like strawberry ice cream?
37. Do your shoes have black on them?
38. How many letters are in your first name?
39. Do you know what day Christmas is on?
40. Do you walk to school?
41. Have you ever had to wear a cast?
42. How many windows are in your house?
43. How many grandmothers do you have?
44. Do you have a 2-wheel bike?
45. Did you wear a coat today?
46. Have you seen one of the Great Lakes?
47. Do you have pierced ears?
48. Do you know how to roller skate?
49. Did you brush your teeth this morning?
50. Is winter your favorite season?
51. Do you have a teddy bear?
52. How many pairs of shoes do you have?
53. Have you ever ridden in a train?
54. Do you think math is easy?
55. How many syllables are in your last name?
56. Do you like sweet potatoes?
57. Were you in bed at 9:30 last night?
58. Who has hair shorter than their shoulders?
59. Have you ever been to our state capital?
60. Do you have a TV in your bedroom?
61. Can you say all of "Peter Picked A Peck of Pickled Peppers" without a
mistake?
62. Have you ever had to stay overnight in a hospital?
63. Did you play a sport?
64. Do you wear glasses?
65. Is your hair red?
66. Did you carry your lunch today?
67. How many letters in your last name?
68. Did you wear blue today?
69. Do you have any brothers or sisters in high school?
70. Do you have a computer at home?
71. Do you have eyelets in your shoes?
72. What day is your favorite TV show?
73. Do you know how to swim?
74. Have you ever ridden a horse?
75. Did you wear boots today?
76. Do you play an instrument?
77. Do you like country/western music?
78. Have you ever been to the ocean?
79. Does your grandfather have gray hair?
80. Have you had chicken pox?
81. How many doors are in your house?
82. Have you been to another country?
83. Do you like to read?
84. Does your first name have more letters than your last name?
85. How many things did you have for breakfast?
86. Have you ever had to get stitches?
87. Have you ever ridden in a buggy pulled by a horse?
88. Did you comb or brush your hair today?
89. Have you ever been to Washington D.C.?
90. Can you do a magic trick?

Is 47 an odd number?
Is 53 an even number?
Is 73 less than 63?
Is 13 greater than 10?
Does spots rhyme with dots?
Does snow rhyme with cow?
Does this clock show 30 minutes after 2 o'clock? (Draw a clock)
Is March the fourth month of the year?
Was yesterday a "lamb" day?
Is today a "lion" day?
Does 4 quarters equal $1.00?
Does 10+ 5= 17?
Have you ever lived on a farm?
Are there 31 days in March?
Do you like snow?
Do you live in an igloo?
Do you have any sisters?
Will we have 6 more weeks of winter?
Is February a winter month?
Is steam a solid?
Did you do your homework?
Do you have any pets?
Are there 3 vowels in the word CAT?
Will a paperclip float on water?
Does cat rhyme with bat?
Do you know how to spell your name?
Do you have a birthday in December?
Do you have any brothers?
Do you like spiders?
Do spiders have 6 legs?
Is rain a liquid?
Do you like insects?
Do 4 nickels make 20 cents?
Are there 5 Tuesdays in March?
Is March 21 a Thursday?
the obvious are numbers of letters in your
name.....how do you get to school...how many people in the family
Favorite move and/or TV show
What kind of milk do you drink?
What is your favorite cookie?
How many siblings, Have you lost a tooth?
Have you had chicken pos?
Who is your hero?
What month were you born in?
What is your favorite season?
How old are you?

Step into the circle. Make two large circles on the floor with yarn
(each circle a different color). Have children sort themselves in the
circles by boy, girl. Then move to the overlapping circles:
*label one yarn circle "boy" and the other "brown eyes"
*Have boys in calss arrange themselves in the boy circle. Have girls
with brown eyes stand in the other circle. Ask: If you're a boy and
you have brown eyes, where can you stand?
*Reapeat activity labeling girls and brown hair.
* Move to paper venn diagrams. (two circles)
I am wearing sneakers today. I am wearing the color blue.
My first name has more than thraee letters. My last name is longer than
my first.
I like milk. I like peanut butter.
I have a pet. I like animals.
I am the youngest in my family. I have a brother or sister.
I've lived in another state. I like snow.

Three rings:
I like rain. I like thunder. I do not like lightening.
I'm at least five years old. I've lost at least one tooth. I've had
chicken pox.
My favorite color is blue. I'm wearing blue. My name starts with B.
I always read beofre I go to bed. My favorite author is Tomie
dePauola. I like to write stories.
My birthday is in the summer. lThe month of my birthday has more than
four letters. The day of the month I was born on is greater than 10.
how do
you get to school, what kind of pet do you have, how many eyes in your family,
how many spoons in the kitchen, which Clifford book is your favorite, what's
your favorite kind of ice cream, who do you like better, Frog or Toad, how
many letters in your name, and about a million more?

Here are some of the yes/no questions we graph during the year:

* have you ever carved a pumpkin?
* do you have a chimney?
* will the groundhog see his shadow?
* do you like football?
* do you have a little brother or sister?
* is your birthday in ?

Creative Teaching Press has a wonderful book (the 6x9 inch size) called
something like "Graphs All Year Long." It must have at least 50 ideas, maybe
more, and it cost less than $6, if I recall correctly. I'll bring my copy
home from school and add it to the KinderKorner Bookstore.

Have you ever been to a farm?
Can you do a magic trick?
Do you have a garden at home?
Can you with a skipping rope?
Have you ever been to the zoo?
Have you ever been to the circus?
Have you ever mailed a letter?
Are you wearing socks?
Do you have a sandwich in your lunch today?
On Saint Patrick's Day: Are you wearing green today?
At Christmas, Do you believe in Santa?
A New Years, Did you make a resolution for the new year?
Have you ever gone to a different school?
Do you have buckles on your shoes?
Is your hair naturally curly?
Have you ever played the game Monopoly?
Do you like anchovies on pizza?
How many telephones are in your house?
Do you like to eat watermelon?
Did you wear a belt?
Do you own a watch?
Is your birthday in the summer?
Does your jacket have a hood?
Do you have a pet?
Were you named after someone special?
Do you have a middle name?
Do you like to watch sports?
Do you like to wear purple?
Can you speak another language besides English?
Do you have any brothers or sisters in this school?
Did you wash your hair last night?
Have you ever ridden in an airplane?
Do you think your shoe weighs more than your math book?
Did you have milk at breakfast?
Do you have a public library card?
Have you ever taken dance lessons?
Do you like broccoli?
Have you lost any of your canine teeth?
Do you have any brothers or sisters in preschool?
Have you ever been to Walt Disney World?
Do you know what you want to be when you grow up?
What is your favorite school day?
Do you have a cowboy hat?
Who has hair longer than their shoulders?
Were you awake at 6:30 this morning?
Do you like macaroni and cheese?
Are your eyes brown?
Do you know what day of the week you were born on?
Is Valentine's Day your favorite holiday?
Do you think 30 pennies will cover a dollar completely?
Does it take longer than 30 minutes for you to get to school?
Do you like strawberry ice cream?
Do your shoes have black on them?
Have You Ever Gone Fishing?
Do you know what day Christmas is on?
Do you walk to school?
Have you ever had to wear a cast?
Do you have a 2-wheel bike?
Did you wear a coat today?
Have you seen one of the Great Lakes?
Do you have pierced ears?
Do you know how to roller skate?
Did you brush your teeth this morning?
Is winter your favorite season?
Do you have a teddy bear?
Have You Ever Been to the Beach?
Have you ever ridden in a train?
Do you think math is easy?
Do you like sweet potatoes?
Were you in bed at 9:30 last night?
Do you have hair shorter than their shoulders?
Have you ever been to our state capital?
Do you have a TV in your bedroom?
Can you say all of "Peter Picked A Peck of Pickled Peppers" without a
mistake?
Have you ever had to stay overnight in a hospital?
Did you play a sport?
Do you wear glasses?
Is your hair red?
Did you carry your lunch today?
How many letters in your last name?
Did you wear blue today?
Do you have any brothers or sisters in high school?
Do you have a computer at home?
Do you have eyelets in your shoes?
What day is your favorite TV show?
Do you know how to swim?
Have you ever ridden a horse?
Did you wear boots today?
Do you play an instrument?
Do you like country/western music?
Have you ever been to the ocean?
Does your grandfather have gray hair?
Have you had chicken pox?
How many doors are in your house?
Have you been to another country?
Do you like to read?
Does your first name have more letters than your last name?
Have you ever had to get stitches?
Have you ever ridden in a buggy pulled by a horse?
Did you comb or brush your hair today?

Favorites

Favorite activity
Favorite cartoon
Favorite Center
Favorite coin
Favorite color
Favorite day of the week
Favorite dinosaurs
Favorite food (meats, vegetable, dessert, drink, main dish, fast food,
etc)
Favorite fruit
Favorite game
Favorite holiday
Favorite ice cream
Favorite kind of music
Favorite meal
Favorite month of the year
Favorite penguins
Favorite pet
Favorite piece of playground equipment
Favorite pizza
Favorite rainy day activity
Favorite school lunch
Favorite season
Favorite 'special'
Favorite sport (Football, baseball, basketball)
Favorite story
Favorite story character
Favorite subject in school
Favorite summer activity
Favorite super hero
Favorite thing to read (book, magazine, comics, cereal box!),
Favorite toothpaste
Favorite transportation
Favorite vegetable
Favorite version of a story
Favorite way to travel
Favorite winter activity
Favourite after school activity
Favourite book title
Favourite literature genre
Favourite sport
Favourite time of day: morning, afternoon, evening
Favourite TV show


What kind of bear would you like to be? (Bears)
How do you want the pumpkin carved, scary or friendly? (Pumpkins)
Are you left or right handed?
Are your hands clean or dirty when you came into the classroom this
morning?
Back pack/ lunchbox
Coats/sweaters
Color of eyes
Color of hair
How did you feel about coming to school? Happy or sad
How did you get to school?
How do you feel on the first day of school?
How Do You Feel Today?
How do you get to school?
How Do You Like Your Apples? (Sliced, sauce, baked)
How many languages can you speak?
How many people are in your family?
How many vowels are in your name?
How old are you?
How your shoes are fastened: shoe laces, Velcro, buckles, slip-ons
Is your pet a reptile, mammal, fish, bird pet?
Kind of toothpaste
Lion and lamb graph...cool or warm weather
Long sleeves/short sleeves
Mode of transportation used when their family went on their last
holiday: car, bus, boat, train, plane, etc.
Month you were born
Number of bedrooms in your house
Number of boys and girls
Number of brothers and sisters
Number of letters in your first name
Number of pencils you have in your desk
Number of pets at home
Number of pockets on your clothing
Number of teeth lost
Provide 2 - 3 cookies and have the kids graph their favorite one.
Provide 2 - 3 different juices and graph their favorite.
Provide 2 - 3 different kinds of cereal and graph their favorite. (Ex.
Cheerios, golden grahams, Trix)
Shirt- patterned or solid color
Swimming-lake, ocean, pool
Their age
Time you go to bed
Time you wake up in the morning
Type of clothing worn that day: shorts, pants, T-shirt, sweater, vest,
etc.
Type of job they would like to have when they grow up
Using 2 - 3 video movie boxes have the kids graph their favorite movie.
Using 2 postcards (Ex: Disney World, Sea World) Graph Where you would
like to go on vacation.
What are you eating for lunch? hot lunch or cold lunch
What colour is your hair?
What did you have for breakfast?
What do you like to receive for presents? (Books, games, money, toys,
clothes)
What do you wear to keep your hands warm? (Mittens, Gloves)
What kind of home do you live in? Single-family, two-family flat,
four-family flat, apartment house, etc. (I found I had to introduce the
concept the day before and have kids check with parents.)
What Kind Of Pizza Do You Like? (Cheese, Pepperoni, Sausage)
What letter does your name start with
What they hope to do (or did) on their summer holidays: go to another
city (go on vacation), swim in a lake, go hiking, etc.
What you like best to write on (paper, chalkboard, magic slate, etc)
What you like best to write with (pencil, crayon, marker, chalk, etc)
What you will eat for lunch today
Which do you Like Best? (Celery, Carrot)
Which fast-food restaurant do you like best? (Wendy's, Burger King,
McDonald's)
Which milk do you like? (White, chocolate)
Which Soup Do You Like Best? (Chicken Noodle, Vegetable, Tomato)
Would You Rather Have a Pet with Fur, Fins, or Feathers


STATISTICS, DATA ANALYSIS, and PROBABILITY

1.2 Identify, describe, and extend simple patterns, (such as circles or triangles) by referring to their shape, sizes and colors.

Pattern building and extending:
Pocket chart a pattern then have children build and extend the pattern using unifix cubes, macaroni, shells, paper pattern blocks etc. Students can record their patterns by drawing them on paper or gluing objects to construction paper strips.

Pattern train: everyone sits in a circle. Teacher shows children a simple pattern, slap-clap the pattern, then pass the pattern to a student and have the child add on the next cube. Continue passing the pattern and discussing what comes next. Next cover the pattern with a tube. Show a part of the pattern and have students predict what will come next.

Calendar Patterning: use two different calendar date pictures to create a pattern on your calendar. For example: Sept. use apples and pencils. Create a simple AB pattern and turn your cards over. Every day predict the pattern and act it out. Snap and clap, clap hands and slap knees, touch heads and shoulders. This is an activity that helps those kinesthetic learners.