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Literature
Grade: Middle
Subject: Literature

#2259. (DR-TA) Poe's Cask of Amontillado

Literature, level: Middle
Posted Fri May 25 12:09:39 PDT 2001 by Kirk T Walker (kirktylerwalker@hotmail.com).
List of Works for High School English
Oldfield, Missouri, USA
Materials Required: multi-colored paper/index cards
Activity Time: Full Period
Concepts Taught: characterization, irony, critical thinking

Name: Kirk T Walker

Class: RDG 474

Professor: Dr. Nixon

Date: April 30, 2001

Activity: Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA)

Work: "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe

Evocation:
Students will get into groups of three or four. Each group will be given a different
colored index card with one of four topics written on it. The topics include Edgar
Allan Poe, irony, Italy, and carnivals. There may need to be more than one card
with each topic written on it, but each card should be the same color as other cards
with the same topic. The students will discuss their knowledge of and experiences
with the topic they receive. After two or three minutes they switch cards with
another group and discuss a new topic. After four rotations each group should
have discussed each topic.


Realization of Meaning:
Students read the first section of the story. The teacher leads the students in
discussion by using open-ended questions as prompts to draw out key ideas and
students' personal reactions, emotions, predictions, etc. Questions for the first
stop should include: How do you feel about the narrator? Do his feelings seem
justified? What does Fortunado's name seem to imply about his character?
Students read the second section of the story. The teacher again leads the students
in discussion. Questions for the second stop include: Which character seems more
likeable? What does Fortunado's dress imply about his character? How does
Fortunado seem to feel about the narrator?
Students read the rest of the story. The teacher leads the students in a final
discussion. Discussion questions should include: How was this story ironic? How
do you feel about the narrator? How do you feel about Fortunado? How would
you change the ending? How does Poe make the narrator's character seem more
sympathetic than we would expect him to be in this story? How is setting
important in this story? Did you think that Montressor's actions were justified?
Why or why not?

Reflection:
The students should return to their groups. Each group is given a different colored
index card with one of five quotes written on it. The quotes include:
"An eye for eye only ends up making the whole world blind." -- Mahatma Gandhi
"Don't get mad, get even." -- Robert F. Kennedy
"She got even in a way that was almost cruel. She forgave them." -- Ralph McGill
about Eleanor Roosevelt
"Success is the sweetest revenge." -- Vanessa Williams
"Revenge is often like biting a dog because the dog bit you." -- Austin O'Malley

The students will discuss the meanings of the quotes, their own experiences, and
the way in which the quotes apply to the work. After five minutes they switch
cards with another group and discuss a new topic. After five rotations each group
should have discussed each topic.

The stops should occur as follows:
...my smile NOW was at the thought of his immolation. FIRST STOP He had a weak point...

...stood stupidly bewildered. SECOND STOP A moment more and I had fettered him...