Grade: Elementary

#2826. Literary Map-Making

Reading/Writing, level: Elementary
Posted Wed Mar 5 12:20:11 PST 2003 by Leah Stevens (leah_erik@mag-net.com).
UNBC Education Program, Prince George, Canada
Materials Required: Paper, Story book with journey
Activity Time: 1 hour and 15 minutes
Concepts Taught: Sequencing of events in a story

Unit Title: Literary Map-Making
Lesson Title: Modeling
Grade Level: 2/3
Date: February 24, 2003
Total Time Required: 1:15

IRP: English Language Arts K to 7
Page #: 36
Curriculum Organizer: Comprehend and Respond (Comprehension)
Prescribed Learning Outcome: Retell and sequence events and ideas from selections they have read, heard, or viewed.

Knowledge Objectives:
Through the creation of a story map, demonstrate an understanding that there are a series events that occur during a story.

Skills Objectives:
Ask and respond to questions before, during, and after listening.
Describe aspects of stories, including characters, where and when the events took place, and what happened.
Organize details and information to make simple, sequenced illustrations.

Preparations: Prepare an overhead of Red Riding Hood map.

Introduction: Time: 20 mins.
1.Introduce the unit by explaining that we will be looking at stories in which someone takes a journey.
2.Ask the students if they can think of any stories in which a character takes a journey.
3.We will be keeping track of the journeys we read about by creating maps tracing the events that occur in the story.
4.What are some of the items we can use to help us keep track of the journey -- places, events, characters that are introduced, etc.
5.The first story we will be looking at is Little Red Riding Hood -- so as I read try to keep track of her journey in your head.
6.Read Little Red Riding Hood.
7.After reading the story, ask the students to suggest items that would have to be shown on a map of the story -- Little Red's house, the woods, Grandma's house.
8.Write these suggestions on the board in an organized format -- explain the format to the students.
9.If significant items go unnoticed, use prompting questions to illicit these.

Main Activity: Time: 40 mins.
1.Using the overhead map, have the children help you fill in the suggestions on the board.
2.Ask the children what pictures should be drawn for each of these suggestions -- characters, actions, etc.
3.Inform the students that they will be completing their own story map of the story.
4.Inform the students that the map they would be creating would require them to draw out Little Red's path from her house to her grandmothers, to draw each significant place (houses, meadow, forest), and to place each character in the story.
5.Inform the students that they must label every item on their map.
6.Inform the students that you will be leaving the suggestions on the board to help them get started.
7.Have the students go to their seats.
8.As the students are working, monitor their progress, and help them by prompting them with questions.

Conclusion: Time: 15 mins.
1.Have the students come back to the floor.
2.Have the students share some of their work with the class.
3.Discuss how some people have different perceptions of what they consider important in the story and how people represent things differently.
4.Inform the students of what they will be doing during the next class and the story we would be reading -- Guided Practice and The Amazing Bone.
5.Have the students hand in their maps.

Extensions:
1.Have the students add a brief explanation of what occurred during the story.
2.Have the students add colour to their depiction.
Materials/Resources:
1.Little Red Riding Hood
2.A basic map of Little Red Riding Hood's journey (overhead)
3.Paper for students' maps

Evaluation:
Has the student completed a map sequencing the events in the story?
Have all of the characters been included?
Have all of the places been included?
Has everything been labeled?
- Assess using 4-point scale: (1) has not met expectations to (4) has exceeded expectations.

References:
Johnson, Terry D. & Louis, Daphne R. (1987). Bringing it All Together: A Program for Literacy. Richmond Hill: Scholastic. Pp.117-122.
Unit Title: Literary Map-Making
Lesson Title: Modeling
Grade Level: 2/3
Date: February 24, 2003 Total Time Required: 1:15
IRP: English Language Arts K to 7 Page #: 36
Curriculum Organizer: Comprehend and Respond (Comprehension) Prescribed Learning Outcome: Retell and sequence events and ideas from selections they have read, heard, or viewed (p.36).
Knowledge Objectives:
Through the creation of a story map, demonstrate an understanding that there are a series events that occur during a story.
Skills Objectives:
Ask and respond to questions before, during, and after listening.
Describe aspects of stories, including characters, where and when the events took place, and what happened.
Organize details and information to make simple, sequenced illustrations.
Preparations: Prepare an overhead of Red Riding Hood map.
Introduction: Time: 20 mins.
1. Introduce the unit by explaining that we will be looking at stories in which someone takes a journey.
2. Ask the students if they can think of any stories in which a character takes a journey.
3. We will be keeping track of the journeys we read about by creating maps tracing the events that occur in the story.
4. What are some of the items we can use to help us keep track of the journey -- places, events, characters that are introduced, etc.
5. The first story we will be looking at is Little Red Riding Hood -- so as I read try to keep track of her journey in your head.
6. Read Little Red Riding Hood.
7. After reading the story, ask the students to suggest items that would have to be shown on a map of the story -- Little Red's house, the woods, Grandma's house.
8. Write these suggestions on the board in an organized format -- explain the format to the students.
9. If significant items go unnoticed, use prompting questions to illicit these.
Main Activity: Time: 40 mins.
1. Using the overhead map, have the children help you fill in the suggestions on the board.
2. Ask the children what pictures should be drawn for each of these suggestions -- characters, actions, etc.
3. Inform the students that they will be completing their own story map of the story.
4. Inform the students that the map they would be creating would require them to draw out Little Red's path from her house to her grandmothers, to draw each significant place (houses, meadow, forest), and to place each character in the story.
5. Inform the students that they must label every item on their map.
6. Inform the students that you will be leaving the suggestions on the board to help them get started.
7. Have the students go to their seats.
8. As the students are working, monitor their progress, and help them by prompting them with questions.
Conclusion: Time: 15 mins.
1. Have the students come back to the floor.
2. Have the students share some of their work with the class.
3. Discuss how some people have different perceptions of what they consider important in the story and how people represent things differently.
4. Inform the students of what they will be doing during the next class and the story we would be reading -- Guided Practice and The Amazing Bone.
5. Have the students hand in their maps.
Extensions:
1. Have the students add a brief explanation of what occurred during the story.
2. Have the students add colour to their depiction. Materials/Resources:
1. Little Red Riding Hood
2. A basic map of Little Red Riding Hood's journey (overhead)
3. Paper for students' maps
Evaluation:
Has the student completed a map sequencing the events in the story?
Have all of the characters been included?
Have all of the places been included?
Has everything been labeled?
- Assess using 4-point scale: (1) has not met expectations to (4) has exceeded expectations.

References:
Johnson, Terry D. & Louis, Daphne R. (1987). Bringing it All Together: A Program for Literacy. Richmond Hill: Scholastic. Pp.117-122.