More Lessons Like This...
Random Five More New
Grade:
Subject:
Pre-School
other
Grade: Pre-School
Subject: other

#2992. Harry the Dirty Dog

other, level: Pre-School
Posted Sat Feb 28 06:06:50 PST 2009 by Nicole Caldwell (Nicole Caldwell).
Positively Autism - Teacher Resources
Positively Autism, USA
Materials Required: clip art from the book, glue, construction paper, crayons, glitter, small toy dogs, book
Activity Time: Includes various activities
Concepts Taught: sequence, counting, patterns, phonics

Harry the Dirty Dog
Mini Unit Plan
(Activities for One Day in Pre-K or Kindergarten)

Read the Book Aloud
- Review the names of parts of a book: title, author, illustrator, front cover, back
cover, and spine.
- Predict and Preview: Ask students to look at the cover of the book and share what
they think the book will be about.
- Read the story aloud to students.
- Modifications for students with autism (if necessary): (1) for predict and preview, point
to a character on the book cover, ask the student "what is this?" and, after the student
responds, say something like, "Yes, that's right. The story might be about a dog." This
introduced the concept of making a prediction based on the cover art, (2) have the names
of each part of the book written on a card, and show the card to students as you point to
and discuss each part of the book (placing the written word on the actual part of the
book). This provides a visual aid for the student with autism to go along with your spoken
words, (3) praise/reward the student when he or she is looking at the book as you are
reading, or is responding to your questions about the book.

Sequencing
- Students order pictures from the book in the correct sequence (first, second, third
or beginning, middle, end, etc.)
- Glue the pictures in the correct sequence on a piece of construction paper.
- Modifications for students with autism (if necessary): if this is a difficult concept for the student, or if this skill is just beginning to be taught, you might reduce the number of
pictures to two: something clearly from the beginning of the story and something clearly
from the end. After this is mastered, you could gradually add more pictures (in later
lessons).

Math: Counting
- Materials: sheets of construction paper labeled "1 dog," "2 dogs," "3 dogs," etc.
and small toy dogs or paper printouts of dogs.
- Students count the correct number of dogs to be placed on each piece of
construction paper.
- Modifications for students with autism (if necessary): (1) if this is a difficult concept for
the student, or if this skill is just beginning to be taught, you could, for example, trace five
outlines on the "5 Dogs" page and have the student put one dog in each space while
counting. These could be gradually faded out in later lessons. (2) Model counting five
dogs for the student (while counting out loud), then have him or her practice it.

Math: Patterns
- Materials: construction paper, scissors, glue, pictures of Harry the Dog (such as
on the book cover: one picture of a clean Harry and one of a dirty Harry).
- Students can either construct or complete patterns alternating between the picture
of clean Harry and the picture of dirty Harry.
- Modification for students with autism (if necessary): on the construction paper, draw a
box for each of the pictures that he or she will need to complete the pattern, so that he or
she will have a visual cue that something should go in each box, and when all of the
boxes are filled, the project is complete. The teacher can model first if needed.

Phonics: Letter D
- Materials: printout of a large letter "d," glue, glitter.
- Review the name and sound of the letter "d." Review that the animal that they
have been reading about today (dog) begins with the letter "d."
- Students can trace the letter with their finger while saying the letter sound.
- Students "write" the letter "d" with glue on their printout, then shake glitter onto
the glue.
- Modification for students with autism (if necessary): model tracing the letter with a
closed glue bottle before having the student trace the letter with glue or make one
yourself while the student watches.