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Grade:
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Senior
Science
Grade: Senior
Subject: Science

#4378. Organism Relationships

Science, level: Senior
Posted Wed Apr 29 13:20:52 PDT 2009 by K. Muscat (K. Muscat).
Wayne State University - Student, Detroit, MI

Content
• Define:
o Tropic level
o Food chain
o Producer
o Consumer
o Predation
o Predator
o Prey
o Symbiosis
o Mutualism
o Commensalism
o Parasitism
o Host
o Parasite
• Use Inspiration to show relationships between different organisms
Benchmarks
• Michigan Content Standard L3.p2A Describe common relationships among organisms and provide examples of producer/consumer, predator/prey, or parasite/host relationship. (prerequisite)
Learning Resources and Materials
• Wikipedia
• Text
• Inspiration

Development of Lesson

Introduction
• Day 1: Explain to student that the next unit will be discussing relationships between organisms. This is not the parent/child or friendship relationship, but rather how different organisms get food. Ask students how THEY get food when they are hungry. Where does it come from? Try to get them to go as far "back" as possible, to the source of our food, not just from the refrigerator.
• Homework: Students will fill out vocabulary worksheets with all the definitions we will be working with.

Methods/Procedures
• Day 1 - Lecture/discussion
• Day 2 --
o Collect and review vocabulary -- have students provide definitions. Ask for examples of organisms that fit each category.
o Utilizing computer and projector, have students manipulate the organisms provided in Inspiration to identify the various relationships.

Accommodations/Adaptations
• Two students have dyslexia and are slow readers:
o Provide electronic format of assignment so students can use word-processing software to assist with spelling and grammar.
o Provide useful URLs to class to help direct their research efforts. This saves them from having to read unnecessary information and helps to minimize their frustration.
o Also, students can provide visual instead of written examples is they choose.
• One student has ADHD:
o Assignment can be partially graded on the work that is turned in. Any attempt is better than none.
o Provide useful URLs to class to help direct their research efforts. This saves them from having to read unnecessary information and helps to minimize their frustration.
o Also, this student can provide visual instead of written examples is she chooses.
• One student stutters when speaking in front of groups or strangers:
o Before class, ask student to volunteer to manipulate organisms on Inspiration. While it requires standing in front of the class, there doesn't not need to be a verbal interaction.

Assessment/Evaluation
• Was homework completed and correct?
• Level of student participation during Inspiration in-class exercise

Closure
• Go back to discussion from Day 1.
• Where do we get our food? Are humans consumers/producers? Predatory/prey? Parasites/hosts?
• How do our relationships with our food sources affect them and their ecosystem?
• Why is it important to make sure we don't pollute their (our) ecosystem?

Teacher Reflection
• To be completed after the lesson.