Grade: all
Subject: other

#4489. Finding Our Way Around School with Map

, level: all
Posted Mon Nov 22 19:21:11 PST 2010 by C. Lindell (C. Lindell).
Austin, US
Materials Required: Map, pencils, book, compass
Concepts Taught: Social Studies/Maps

Finding our way with a map
Carolyn Lindell

GOAL:
The student will be able to create a simple legend for a map of the school and locate places within the school using the map, compass rose and legend. Also, children will also learn to use the vocabulary of directions (north, south, east, west). They will be able to name the uses of a map in their immediate location and in the world beyond their classroom, school and community.

TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS THAT APPLY
(4) Geography. The student understands the relative location of places. The student is expected to:
(A) locate places using the four cardinal directions; and
(B) describe the location of self and objects relative to other locations in the classroom and school.
(5) Geography. The student understands the purpose of maps and globes. The student is expected to:
(A) create and use simple maps to identify the location of places in the classroom, school, community, and beyond;
RESEARCH SUPPORTING THIS PLAN
Crucial to learning about geography is understanding that maps are representations of places, according to "Child Development and Education" by McDevitt and Ormrod. "By age 3 or 4, children have some ability to recognize relationships between simple graphics and the physical locations that the graphics represent (J. Huttenlocher, et. al., 1999; Perralta & Maita, 2007). During the next several years, children can increasingly use maps to identify locations in their immediate, familiar surroundings (Blades & Spencer, 1987; Davies & Uttal, 2007)." The book also says, "A major goal of any geography curriculum must be to foster an understanding of the symbolic nature of maps . . . One effective strategy is to ask children to create their own maps, perhaps of their neighborhood, town, or country (Enyedy, 2005; Forbes et al., 1999; Gregg & Leinhardt, 1994a)."

MATERIALS
1. Maps
2. Paper
3. Easel chart
4. Book titled "Maps and Symbols"
5. Pencils/markers/crayons
Elmo visual presenter
INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES
INTRO
1. Teacher will call students to come sit on the square in the carpet. Teacher will ask students, "Have you ever been lost?" "What did you do to find your way?" "Has your family ever been looking for someplace while driving?" "What did they use to help them find it?"
2. Teacher will ask, "Why do you think we have maps?" "How do you make a map?" "Have you ever been in an airplane or tall building and looked down at the ground?" Teacher will explain that maps are from an overhead view looking down. Teacher and students will discuss that maps are visual representations on paper of places around them. Teacher will write and go over the directional words on easel chart, such as north, south, east, west, left, right, straight.
3. Teacher will ask whether students have ever used a map before. When and where? (The students have used them on a field trip.) Teacher will ask if students know of different kinds of maps. Teacher will write list on the easel chart, such as GPS, Google maps, Mapquest, atlas, etc. Teacher will write what students say. (The students have already used a map on a field trip and they have made a compass to learn directions.)
4. Teacher will show students examples of different types of maps, such as an atlas, a globe, a museum floor plan, a city map.
5. Teacher will ask students what kinds of things are on a map. Teacher will write on easel chart the students' responses, such as streets, directions, etc.
6. Teacher will ask students to raise their right hands, then raise their left hands, to review those directional words. Teacher will ask students to point to the four directions posted in the room on signs.
7. Teacher will explain to students how to play "Simon Says North, South, East, West." Teacher will give directions saying "Simon Says take to steps north." "Simon Says make two hops south." "Simon says, take three baby steps east," etc.

DURING
1. Teacher will introduce book "Maps and Symbols".
2. Teacher will tell students to listen for the different kinds of maps mentioned in the story. Teacher will ask for examples afterward.
3. Teacher will read the book.
4. Teacher will ask students to raise their hands and list the different maps mentioned in the book.
5. Teacher will ask students if they could explain how to get from their classroom to the library without using a map. Ask for a volunteer to explain how to get to library. Then ask for a volunteer to describe how to get to the cafeteria.
6. Teacher will hand out map of school with no words on it. Students will go back to their desks.
7. Teacher will take map of school without key or words on it and use it on the. She will ask students if they recognize this map.
8. Teacher will ask students what symbols they should use in the key to identify each place, for example, a fork for the cafeteria. Teacher will demonstrate how to draw key and symbols on their map.
9. She will ask students to help identify the various parts of the map. Where is the library? Where is the office? Where is the caf? Where is the gym? Where is the playground? Where is Mrs. Shows' room? What do the squares represent? Students and teacher will come up with simple symbols to represent each place on the map.
10. Together, teacher and students will identify each place on the map, using the symbols they agreed on. Students will fill in their maps, using the symbols/key developed together on the projector. If they have time, they can color in their maps with crayons/markers.
11. With teacher guidance, students will draw their route they will use to go to six places on the map (library, office, caf, gym, playground and back to their classroom). Teacher will model using words correctly when discussing how to get places. Teacher will use phrases such as "turn left, go straight, turn right, head north, etc." Teacher will review these words as she is using them.

ENDING
1. Students and teacher will take their maps on a tour of the school. Each student will carry their map. Teacher will gather students at the classroom door. Teacher will ask students which direction they need to go to get to the library. Following student-led suggestions, class will walk to the library. Teacher will model speech by talking about turning left, right, straight and going north, south, east, west.
2. When the class arrives at the library, teacher will ask how they get to the office. Following student suggestions, they will walk to the office.
3. At the office, teacher will ask students how to get to the cafeteria and gym. Following student suggestions, they will walk to the cafeteria and gym.
4. Teacher will ask students how to get to the playground. Following student suggestions, they will walk to the playground.
5. Teacher will ask students how to get to their classroom. Following students suggestions, they will arrive back in class.
6. On the side of their map, students will use their directional vocabulary to describe how to get from Mrs. Shows' classroom to one other place identified on the map. They will use words such as left, right, north, south, straight, etc.

Check for Understanding:
What are things you look for on a map?
How do you "find" yourself when looking at a map? Teacher will remind students that sometimes you need to turn your map in the direction you want to walk.

MODIFICATIONS
For English language learners and remedial writers: Students can draw symbols only instead of words when giving directions on paper. Advanced students can locate and identify more places on the school map.

CLOSURE
After the lesson, teacher will ask students what direction is north, east, south and west. She will ask students for other places they could locate on their map. Teacher will ask students what they found difficult or easy about using the map.

EVALUATION
Teacher will assess students according to rubric, below. (Rubric modeled after rubric by Dr. O'Neal.)

RUBRIC

LEVEL 4
DIRECTIONS: Student labeled and wrote 3 steps for getting from class to the library.
SYMBOLS: Student correctly placed 5 to 6 symbols on map and key.
APPLICATION: Student used map during class walk and was able to follow route.

LEVEL 3
DIRECTIONS: Student labeled and wrote 2 steps for getting from class to the library.
SYMBOLS: Student correctly placed 3 to 4 symbols on map and key.
APPLICATION: Student used map part of the time during walk and was able to follow the route.


LEVEL 2
DIRECTIONS: Student labeled and wrote one step for getting from class to the library.
SYMBOLS: Student correctly placed 1 or 2 symbols on map and key.
APPLICATION: Student used map part of the time during walk but was not able to follow the route.


LEVEL 1
DIRECTIONS: Student did not write directions.
SYMBOLS: Student did not put symbols on map and key.
APPLICATION: Student did not use map during walk and did not follow the route.