Grades

    Re: Math standards
    DonnaR/CA


    > with and how we can improve our programs. As American
    > teachers, what are your thoughts on the current core
    > standards? Do you find them "workable?" Are there too
    many
    > standards to meet? Not enough? Would love your feedback,
    > esp in regards to the math curriculum. Thanks.

    You may be opening up a hornet's nest, but here goes my own
    opinion (not be confused with my school's, my state's, or
    the US's).

    Phthththth on much of CCSS Math.

    OK, the first idea behind Common Core was to get states on
    the same idea of curriculum each year, so that a child
    could successfully move from State A to State B and not
    find him/herself either repeating or losing material.
    Great thought. However, that's where (IMHO) the good
    stopped.

    Then came the idea, less standards, but get deeper into
    them. For Kindergarten (so say my colleagues), this meant
    we are not spending time with teaching money, a ruler,
    patterning (BIG mistake, IMHO). OK, two out of the three
    isn't bad there.

    However, in my brand new Math textbook this year, in Unit
    1, within the first 10 lessons, I am supposed to introduce
    the idea of partner numbers. I.E. 3 red and 2 blue color
    tiles is 5, the same as 5 blue color tiles. About half of
    my students "get" that concept. The others are barely
    figuring out getting 5 tiles of ANY color on the page. So
    here we are, lesson 5 or 6, and already losing kids. I
    figure it this way -- I'll introduce the idea, and those
    kids that "get" it are that much ahead. For the rest of
    them, let's just get 5 tiles on the page and not worry
    about what color they are.

    I took a peek at the upper grades textbooks. YeGads, it
    reminded me of the SRA "New Math" of the 1960s - the ones
    that lost me in Math for years afterwards.

    About half the states have adopted CCSS. A few states
    adopted it and then rescinded it, for very good reasons.

    Donna