Grades

    Re: behavior
    Flacka

    If he is a good or above average student, he is probably
    bored and trying to keep himself occupied. (I am the mother
    of a child like this). Isolating him will just make it worse
    because he wants the attention and he will get it any way he
    can! (Been there, done that!)

    So, if academics aren't a problem, then you need to find
    ways to keep him busy - NOT busy work, but with creative,
    challenging & interesting activities. Sit down with him and
    discuss his behavior and its impact on the class. Next, and
    this is very important, ask him what else he could do that he
    would like and not be disruptive to the class. Ask the
    parents what he enjoys doing or leaning about and figure out
    how to keep him busy. Check with the gifted teacher for
    ideas and resources. You might have him do a research
    project on a topic of HIS choice and present it to the class,
    give him some open ended math/writing/science projects on
    topics that interest HIM, etc..

    Basically, you have to involve him in directing his learning or
    you will be locked into the fight of your life and you won't
    win, trust me! If you want some specific ideas, let me know.

    If the child is struggling academically, his behavior may be
    an effort to divert you away from the problem so you focus
    on his behavior. In either case, you need to get to the root of
    the problem before it escalates.

    On 2/13/16, Jane wrote:
    > I have a student who is a class clown. He disturbs the
    > others at all times throughout the day by making noises,
    > talking inappropriately, blowing in faces, etc...When I
    > ask him to stop the behaviors he does but then restarts
    > as soon as I turn away. I have found the best thing is to
    > send him to the back corner of the carpet away from
    > touching distance of the others or send him to his own
    > desk instead of allowing him to stay at the table with
    > the others. Mom is furious that I would isolate him. What
    > would you do with a student like this? I'm open for ideas
    > that will allow for my other children to learn and stay
    > safe.