Grades

    Re: What does your school provide
    DonnaR/CA

    Our district provides all the main language, math, science,
    social studies and PE materials and equipment. Usually,
    when you buy a language arts program, it comes with umpteen
    guided reading books, often either a student textbook or
    big books (depending on grade level), workbooks, blackline
    masters, and more. Every time the district buys a math
    program, it appears to come with Unifix/snap cubes, pattern
    blocks, and a bunch of other manipulatives, plus charts,
    textbooks, teacher guides, workbooks, blackline masters,
    and more. Science curriculum appears to come with all sorts
    of stuff for hands-on science (one program even came with
    aluminum foil, plastic wrap, and a box of baking soda).
    Social studies usually had no manipulatives, but lots of
    books. Teachers don't have to buy any of that stuff.

    What we end up buying -- bulletin board backing, borders,
    ready-made games and puzzles, and other class learning
    materials.

    School supplies -- school provides pencils, pens, glue
    sticks, erasers, student scissors (we get one class set and
    you better keep them from year to year!), teacher staplers
    and staples, teacher tape dispenser and tape, white board
    markers and erasers, chalk (we have both kinds of boards in
    our 31 year old school), and the older kids have
    protractors and compasses (same as student scissors; save
    from year to year). Photocopy paper, white only, is
    provided. (You want colored? You buy!) Construction paper
    in basic colors, 9x12 and 12x18. (Want a different color?
    Either make do or buy your own. No cardstock is provided.)
    Die-cuts are available, thanks to PTA, but they are
    starting to wear out. Some large white chart paper and
    manila sentence strips are available. Only a few file
    folders, you get 'em while they're hot. Composition books.
    Lined newsprint in various sizes. (The unlined is running
    out fast and will not be replaced.) Some colored butcher
    paper, and white, is available, but only about 4 colors.
    Student crayons - two boxes per school year. A home-school
    communication folder.

    What I usually buy - markers in all colors. Extra dry erase
    markers, especially in the "fun" colors. Sharpies. Colored
    photocopy paper, though I've been lucky to get donations in
    recent years. Cardstock. Desk name tags. Student name tags.
    Folders for spares. Blackline masters. Materials to make my
    own games. Poster board. Classroom decor and storage,
    though I was fortunate to inherit a lot from a retiring
    teacher.

    I make a list every year for donations. Every year, I am
    lucky enough to get stuff donated -- hand sanitizer,
    tissue, art materials like tissue paper and paper plates,
    one mom brought me a big Costco pack of paper towels and a
    bottle of disinfectant (and when she came in she uses it; I
    get this mom again this year and I'm so fortunate that she
    has another kindergartner).

    FWIW, I also have a huge classroom library of books that
    the kids use, and I use for supplemental literature. Every
    one of those books was either bought by me, or given to me,
    or I inherited from someone else. I love the friends of the
    library book sale where you can fill a bag for $10. The
    thrift stores in town are also favorite haunts. I sure
    don't pass up the "give away" table at school where
    teachers give away things that they no longer want. (I've
    contributed a lot of stuff to that table, too, so it works
    both ways.)

    Hope this helps!

    Donna